Johns

Date of Entry: 28/12/2018
Surname: Johns
Christian Names: Daryle Wayne
Country: Australia
State or Province: South Australia
City or Town: Port Pirie
Service #: 4720572
Service: Army
Branch: Australian Army Catering Corps
Case Notes:

 

Johns served as a Catering Corps Corporal who was assigned to Royal Australian Armoured Corps (RAAC) units in Vietnam from 28 November 1969 until 19 November 1970.

 

Johns

 

Notice that Johns wears the regalia of the RAAC veteran, including Armoured Corps beret and hat badge. In addition he wears an Army Combat Badge attached to his Australian Active Service Medal.

 

Johns chooses to shun his Catering Corps heritage and wear the more prestigious trappings of an Armoured Corps veteran.

 

Non Armoured Corps soldiers posted to Armoured Corps combat units in Vietnam would have had some routine guard and patrol duties at the Nui Dat base, but were never deployed on combat operations.

 

In a newspaper article, Johns says the following:

 

Johns2

 

The term "Tet" refers to the celebration of the 1968 Vietnamese New Year which became the bloodiest time of the war.

 

Johns did not participate in the "Tet Offensive". The "Tet Offensive" was officially named The General Offensive and Uprising of Tet Mau Than 1968, and was one of the largest military campaigns of the Vietnam War. It commenced on 30 Jan 1968 and continued until February, that year. It was indeed a torrid time. In 1969 on the anniversary of the 1968 "Tet Offensive" there was increased activity from the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong, that period in 1969 has been accepted as a second Tet Offensive. There were no more Tet Offensives. Johns was in Nui Dat for a resurgence of activity in January 1970 and has claimed that time as being a Tet Offensive.

 

Army Combat Badge (ACB)

 

The Royal Australian Armoured Corps (RAAC) Association advises that all non Corps personnel posted to Armoured Corps combat units in Vietnam were awarded the ACB.

 

"The purpose of the ACB is not to recognise combat duties but to recognise service with a combat element through formal force assignment and been physically deployed in the same geographical location as a Combat Team and have a primary role to directly support that Combat Team for a period of either a continuous or an aggregate of 90 days satisfactory service".

It must not be worn attached to an Australian Active Service Medal (AASM). Protocol directs that it is worn on the left breast above medals.

Johns3 2018 12 18

 

Johns earned the medals that he wears.

He earned the right to wear an ACB, but not attached to his AASM.

 

He did not earn the right to wear the RAAC beret and badge.

 

He did not earn the right to have claimed to have served in Vietnam during the "Tet Offensive".

 

For his actions Daryle Johns has earned the right to be featured on this website.

 

 

 

 

Located in: Stolen Valour
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