Medal Cheats

Medal Cheats

Surname: Dixon
Christian Names: Ian
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Junee
Service #: 2781804
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 


Dixon 1 2

The above photo of Dixon was taken at the Junee Vietnam Veterans Day service, and his campaign medals are proudly displayed, along with various Unit Citations.

Dixon was conscripted into the Australian Army, serving 372 days in Vietnam, as a member of the 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (6 RAR). Just over eight weeks after the unit arriving in Vietnam its members would be involved in the Battle of Long Tan.

During this deployment 6 RAR saw considerable combat, with the Unit being awarded citations by the Governments of the United States and South Vietnam.

Justifiably, Dixon can be very proud to have served with such a Unit and also of the medals and citations awarded for that service.

Dixon, however, cannot be proud of the fact he has attached a commemorative, or as commonly known, a ‘tin medal’, to his Service medals. Doing such may impress those that do not know, however, you do not fool your fellow veterans, who would recognise you had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

 

Dixon 2 2

The Front Line Service Medal was issued by the 2/12 Infantry Battalion Association, based in Queensland, to identify those who took part in World War Two front line actions with the Infantry, differentiating them from other units. It was manufactured and sold by that Association as a funds raising exercise. They made a lot of money selling this tin trinket to gullible people, who had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

Defence Honours and Awards has this to say about such medals:

“A relatively recent phenomenon in the medal world is the appearance of a wide variety of non-official medals, generally referred to as ‘private commemoratives’ but also called ‘tinnies’. A non-official medal is any medal that is not listed in the Order of Wearing of Australian Honours and Awards, which was published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette Special No. S.101 of 4 April 2002.

 Medals not listed in the order of wear may be worn officially, on an unrestricted basis, only with the express permission of the Governor-General. As a general rule, such permission is extended only to official awards of foreign governments. It has never been extended to private commemorative medals. Those medals should not be worn at all, and certainly never on the left hand side and mounted with officially issued medals”.

Ian Dixon, your Vietnam service has earned you the medals that you can be proud to wear. However, your total lack of respect by adding a worthless commemorative 'tin' medal, has earned you the award of appearing on the ANZMI site.

Surname: Gray
Christian Names: Thomas Joseph
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Dubbo
Service #: R58653
Service: Navy
Branch: Underwater Control
Commencement of service: 01 Feb 1962
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

Thomas (Tom) Joseph Gray is the President of the Dubbo RSL Sub-Branch, and has been for a number of years. Gray has been very proactive in promoting the RSL within the local community, building up membership and increasing public awareness of the sacrifices of our veterans, through numerous public ceremonies, presentations at various schools, and supporting community activities and awards.

Gray has had a long Naval career, seeing service in Malaysia, as part of the Far Eastern Strategic Reserve (FESR), and Vietnam along with other extensive seagoing deployments.

Gray 1

The above photograph was taken at a Remembrance Day service, in 2015 at Dubbo. This is one of a number of photographs taken at various services, all showing Gray wearing the same medals. Gray has been adequately recognised for his service to our country with the eight official medals he was awarded. The last medal (shown below) is quite simply a piece of rubbish, known as the FESR Commemorative Medal.

Gray 2

The FESR Commemorative Medal is best described as ‘an abomination’, being nothing more than an insult to those who have genuinely earned Service medals awarded by their country. This medal can be purchased like a trinket from a market stall, and is just as worthless, not belonging beside official medals.

In wearing this medal, Gray has dishonoured his position as a member of the Sub-Branch executive, dishonoured his fellow Veterans, and devalued the system we have for recognising the service of those before us and in the future.

Thomas Joseph Gray, you are not alone, you have now earned your place amongst the ever-increasing cadre of RSL Sub-Branch executives who thumb their noses at tradition and protocol, seemingly ignored by respective State Headquarters, who continually turn a blind eye to such appalling conduct.

Surname: Delaforce
Christian Names: Raymond Richard
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Emu Park
Service #: 1733581
Service: Army
Branch: RAE
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

Delaforce 1

At any ANZAC Day service there is a press photographer looking for an opportunity to get a photo that adds atmosphere to the meaning of the day and those participating in it.  ANZAC Day 2016, at Emu Park in Queensland, provided just that opportunity. Raymond Richard Delaforce looks the epitome of the casual and humble attitude displayed by Veterans on such an important day.

Delaforce served 282 days in Vietnam as part of the 1st Field Squadron, Royal Australian Engineers, as the Vietnam War Service certificate, below, shows.

Delaforce 2

An extract of 1st SQN’s service history in Vietnam:

3 Field Troop of 1 FD SQN was deployed to the War in South Vietnam and arrived in Bien Hoa Province on 28 September 1965. When the Australian Task Force was established at Nui Dat in Phouc Tuy Province, the remainder of 1 FD SQN deployed and arrived at Nui Dat on 9 June 1966. The unit was expanded to include 21 Engineer Support Troop, a plant troop, HQ troop, and an expanded RAEME Workshop. In addition, the three combat engineer troops each had an establishment of two officers, a staff sergeant, a sergeant, three corporals, three lance corporals and Sappers to a strength of 65 all ranks. The unit was designated as ”1 FD SQN GP RAE”. The unit returned to Australia in 1972 as a part of the Australian withdrawal from the Vietnam War, and was re-located to Holsworthy.

In the above picture Delaforce is wearing his official medals, all awarded for his service as a ‘Sapper’ with the Royal Australian Engineers. On the left lapel, along with a number of badge-pins, is attached the ‘Front Line’ commemorative medal, not an official medal, in fact nothing more than a worthless trinket.

Delaforce 3

Above, is a picture of the offending item. The Front Line Service Medal was issued by the 2/12 Infantry Battalion Association, based in Queensland, to identify those who took part in World War Two front line actions with the Infantry, differentiating them from other units. It was manufactured and sold by that Association as a funds raising exercise. They made a lot of money selling this tin trinket to gullible people, who had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

Defence Honours and Awards has this to say about such medals:

“Medals not listed in the order of wear may be worn officially, on an unrestricted basis, only with the express permission of the Governor-General. As a general rule, such permission is extended only to official awards of foreign governments. It has never been extended to private commemorative medals. Those medals should not be worn at all, and certainly never on the left hand side and mounted with officially issued medals”.

Now, reading the above, one could argue that Delaforce does not have the ‘tin’ medal mounted with his official medals. The thing appears on the left side of his jacket, with his official medals, and anyone not ‘in the know’ would not realise this.

There is also the glaring issue that Delaforce, who served in the Engineers, is wearing an item produced to commemorate service with the Infantry. What was he thinking when he pinned it on?

Raymond Delaforce, obviously the photographer thought it worthy to take that snap of you on that day, as a result of your folly, you are worthy to earn a permanent place on the ANZMI website.

 

Surname: Cowie
Christian Names: Wayne William
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Rockhampton
Service #: 1735654
Service: Army
Branch: Artillery
Commencement of service: 09 Jul 1969
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

Cowie 1

 

They say that the further North you get in Australia, the more relaxed the people are.

It is certainly true in this picture of a very relaxed Wayne Cowie, taken at a Vietnam Veterans commemorative service, in 2015, at the Cockscomb Veterans Bush Retreat, a nice 30 minute drive from Rockhampton in  Northern Queensland.

Cowie 2

 

Cowie served 277 days in Vietnam as part of the 4th Field Regiment, The Royal Regiment Australian Artillery, as the Vietnam War Service certificate shows.

The 4th Field Regiment was raised at Wacol on 3 May 1960, being the first major Regular Army unit to be raised in Queensland. The Regiment moved to Lavarack Barracks in 1968. As a complete unit, the Regiment served two tours of duty in South Vietnam, as well as sending individual batteries to South Vietnam, Singapore, Malaya and East Timor.

Why this little potted history, you ask? Cowie was part of an artillery unit, a point that will later to prove very important in his undoing.

Cowie 3

At the end of his official medals, Cowie has tacked on a commemorative abomination, this one known as the Front Line Medal. This piece of tin may look pretty, however, you do not fool your fellow veterans, who would recognise you had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

The Front Line Service Medal was issued by the 2/12 Infantry Battalion Association, based in Queensland, to identify those who took part in World War Two front line actions with the Infantry, differentiating them from other units. It was manufactured and sold by that Association as a funds raising exercise. They made a lot of money selling this tin trinket to gullible people, who had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever. You can add Cowie to that list of gullible people.

Defence Honours and Awards has this to say about such medals:

“Medals not listed in the order of wear may be worn officially, on an unrestricted basis, only with the express permission of the Governor-General. As a general rule, such permission is extended only to official awards of foreign governments. It has never been extended to private commemorative medals. Those medals should not be worn at all, and certainly never on the left hand side and mounted with officially issued medals”.

Have you picked up on the glaring inconsistency yet? That’s right, Cowie was attached to an artillery unit, yet he is wearing a thing designed to commemorate service in the infantry.

Yes, they certainly are more relaxed up North, and Wayne Cowie did not have to expend much energy to earn a permanent place on the ANZMI website.

Surname: Coret
Christian Names: Gerardus Cornelius
Country: Australia
State or Province: TAS
City or Town: Lilydale
Service #: 37866680
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Gerardus (Gerry) Coret, Justice of the Peace and President of the Lilydale (Tasmania) RSL Sub-Branch, served 376 days in Vietnam as part of the 5th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment.

Coret 1 2

The above photo of Coret was taken in December 2015 at the Lilydale District School, where the Avenue of Honour, a garden area that honours fallen soldiers from the Lilydale region, was officially opened as part of local ANZAC Centenary commemorations. Coret can be seen here with his campaign medals proudly displayed.

Coret 2

In September 2015, Coret attended a wreath laying at the Lilydale Cenotaph as part of the “Centenary Experience” display in that town. This was just one of the hundreds of commemorative events conducted throughout Australia for the Centenary of ANZAC.

Again, Coret can be seen displaying his medals and one could assume he wears these same medals to all official RSL-related functions, and has done so for some time. He should be proud of the medals he received for his active military service, and also his continuing service as a member of the RSL Sub-Branch Executive.

Coret, however, cannot be proud of the fact he has attached a commemorative, or as more commonly known, a ‘tin medal’, to his Service medals. Doing such may impress those that do not know, however, you do not fool your fellow veterans, who would recognise you had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

Coret 3

The Front Line Service Medal was issued by the 2/12 Infantry Battalion Association, based in Queensland, to identify those who took part in World War Two front line actions with the Infantry, differentiating them from other units. It was manufactured and sold by that Association as a funds raising exercise. They made a lot of money selling this tin trinket to gullible people, who had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

Defence Honours and Awards has this to say about such medals:

“Medals not listed in the order of wear may be worn officially, on an unrestricted basis, only with the express permission of the Governor-General. As a general rule, such permission is extended only to official awards of foreign governments. It has never been extended to private commemorative medals. Those medals should not be worn at all, and certainly never on the left hand side and mounted with officially issued medals”.

Coret has deliberately flouted Government policy in order to give himself just that little more recognition and set himself apart from other Veterans. What he does not seem to understand is that he does not need that piece of ‘tin’ to show his ‘front line’ service as that has been adequately recognised by the Infantry Combat Badge he also wears on his suit.

Perhaps Coret could take onboard some advice from his Hobart cousins, who for a number of years have put out an instruction before each ANZAC Day, regarding dress, saluting and etiquette, stating at section 7:

“Occasionally a person will wrongly claim to be a returned veteran and wear medals to which they are not entitled. This practice is deceitful and disrespectful to the veteran community. Further, there are a number of unofficial medals not recognized through the Australian Honours system which should not be worn at events such as ANZAC Day”.

Gerardus (Gerry) Cornelius Coret, your Vietnam service has earned you the medals that you can be proud to wear. However, by adding a worthless commemorative 'tin' medal, you have earned yourself a place, in the ever-increasing numbers of RSL Sub-Branch Executives, who choose to flout protocol and convention, and in doing bring discredit on the Honours and Awards system and Veterans who have been awarded legitimate medals.

Surname: Harding
Christian Names: Leslie John
Country: Australia
State or Province: SA
City or Town: Arno Bay
Service #: 4717626
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Leslie John Harding served 370 days in Vietnam as part of the 5th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment.

Harding 1

The above photo of Harding was taken at the 2015 Anzac Day service, at Arno Bay in South Australia. Harding can be seen here with his campaign medals proudly displayed, along with an equally impressive scarf in Vietnam campaign medal colours.

Harding 2

Harding, however, cannot be proud of the fact he has attached a commemorative, or as more commonly known, a ‘tin medal’, to his Service medals. Doing such may impress those that do not know, however, you do not fool your fellow veterans, who would recognise you had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

The Front Line Service Medal was issued by the 2/12 Infantry Battalion Association, based in Queensland, to identify those who took part in World War Two front line actions with the Infantry, differentiating them from other units. It was manufactured and sold by that Association as a funds raising exercise. They made a lot of money selling this tin trinket to gullible people, who had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

Defence Honours and Awards has this to say about such medals:

“Medals not listed in the order of wear may be worn officially, on an unrestricted basis, only with the express permission of the Governor-General. As a general rule, such permission is extended only to official awards of foreign governments. It has never been extended to private commemorative medals. Those medals should not be worn at all, and certainly never on the left hand side and mounted with officially issued medals”.

Perhaps the message is not getting through, or perhaps more and more veterans are choosing to disregard protocol and in doing so display they have little respect for their fellow veterans.

Whatever the reason, your effort has earned you a place on the ANZMI site along with other 5th Battalion members, such as Gerardus Coret, with history dictating that your numbers will grow as more are exposed.

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