Medal Cheats

Medal Cheats

Surname: Beren
Christian Names: Arthur Black
Country: New Zealand
State or Province: North Island
City or Town: Kerikeri
NZ -Which Island:
  • North Island
Service #: R63055
Service: RAN
Branch: Electrical
Commencement of service: 08 mar 64
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

Arthur Black Beren (formerly known as Arthur Taiono) was born in the Cook Islands, spending his early years there before moving to Australia, where in 1964, he joined the Royal Australian Navy.

Postings included HMAS Melbourne, HMAS Duchess and HMAS Yarra, involving operational service as part of the Far East Strategic Reserve, and later off Vietnam.

 

WUBeren1

 

The above photograph appeared in several online articles, both in the United States and New Zealand in 2014 and 2015. Arthur can be seen wearing the following medals:

1.       Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75 (entitled)

2.       Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal (entitled)

3.       Australian Service Medal 1945-1975 (entitled)

4.       Regular Forces Service Medal (unofficial ‘tin’ medal)

 

WUBeren2

 

The Regular Forces Service Medal is a commemorative item, more aptly described as ‘junk’. Protocol dictates that such items are never to be worn with official medals and if they are to be worn (though never at an official function), it is on the right breast.

Arthur eventually retired from the RAN and moved to New Zealand, where he is the Honourary Welfare Treasurer of the Kerikeri Returned Services Association (RSA). The wearing of this offensive medal surely denigrates his own service history and his position within the RSA Executive.

The issue here, although seemingly minor, is that Arthur, along with so many others who grace the ANZMI site, have seen fit to add a piece of ‘junk’ to their medal rack to look just that little more impressive and important.

Arthur, if you feel so strongly that you need another medal, ditch that worthless piece of tin. Instead, write to Defence Honours and Awards to receive your Australian Defence Medal, for which you are very much entitled to for your service to Australia.

In the meantime, welcome to the ANZMI site.

Surname: Beasley
Christian Names: Neal Lyndon
Country: Australia
State or Province: Queensland
City or Town: Noosa
Service #: R53761
Service: Royal Australian Navy
Branch: Cook
Commencement of service: 1958
Completion of service: 1978
Case Notes:

 

 

Neal Lyndon Beasley joined the Royal Australian Navy as a Cook in 1958, seeing much sea service in this role, before transferring to Naval Police in 1970. He discharged in 1978, having given 20 years efficient service to his country.

Beasley 1

ANZAC Day 2015, would certainly be a memorable one for Beasley, having been selected by the Department of Veterans Affairs to lay a wreath on behalf of all Australian veterans at the Dawn Service in Villers-Bretonneux, France.

The above photograph appeared online, in “Noosa Today”, on 23 April 2015. The article had an in-depth account of Beasley’s service and how proud he was to be attending the dawn service in France.

Beasley can be seen wearing 10 medals. The first 9, were awarded to him for his service in the Navy, and in particular, operational service in Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and Vietnam. These medals are officially awarded by the Australian Government as part of the long-established honours and awards system.

The last medal is nothing more that tin junk, a medal to commemorate service with the Far East Strategic Reserve (FESR), and usually worn by those wanting to make their row of medals look that little bit more impressive. Service with the FESR was adequately recognised through the official awarding of the Australian Service Medal 1945-75, with clasp ‘FESR’.

Beasley has no cause to be proudly displaying this trinket.

Beasley 2

To all discerning Veterans, the FESR Commemorative is nothing more than a ‘tin’ medal, it has no place with authorised Service medals.

So how did this medal come about? Well, people will collect anything and medals have an attractiveness all of their own, particularly when worn in order to impress others rather than just an official recognition of service to Australia.

This was well set out in the advertising spiel of the organisations who produced the commemorative medal.

“To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the RAN's involvement as an integral part of the Far East Strategic Reserve (FESR), the HMAS Sydney and the VLSV Assoc (Vic) has dedicated this medal to all of those that served on HMAS ships on the FESR.

Ministerial approval was sought and Navy Office have granted an 'Instrument of Consent' to use certain words/letters on the Obverse side of the medal, thereby making it uniquely 'Navy'.

The design of the medal is a very fitting one, with two uniquely naval motifs included in the design. The first, the quarter compass rose, depicts the North West quadrant, signifying the direction of the 'Far East' in relation to Australia. The second is the symbol of a canted and fouled stockless anchor, superimposed with a scroll signifying the RAN's involvement in the FESR from 1955 until its disbandment in 1971. The wreath beneath the anchor crown is representative of the eucalypt leaves of the Australian bush, and is in tribute to the memory of those that did not return from this service to their country.

 The recipient of this medal, whose name appears on the Reverse side, served on the Far East Station in an RAN ship which was a unit of the Commonwealth Strategic Reserve. And in the fine traditions of the Royal Australian Navy, they served Australia well.”

In the above, words like ‘Ministerial, and ‘consent’ and ‘uniquely Navy’, seem to add a pretext of authority to the medal, detracting from what it actually is – an unofficial, worthless piece of metal that simply has no place in military medal history.

Defence Honours and Awards policy dictates specifically that such medals are never to be worn with official medals, a policy that is even reflected on the HMAS Sydney Association website and many other Navy and Military association pages.

Beasley 3 2017 05 26

The ANZAC Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux, France.

On 25 April 2015, thousands of Australians, New Zealanders and French attended the Dawn Service at Villers-Bretonneux. The service was broadcast across the world by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and copies of the video are available on Youtube and many commemorative sites.

Beasley 4

The above image was extracted from the broadcast video at the 46 minutes and 13 seconds point, where Beasley is preparing to lay the wreath on behalf of all Australian veterans. Beasley is still wearing the FESR ‘rubbish’ along with his medals.

Neal Lyndon Beasley, do not feel proud for that day, instead, hang your head in shame for your actions. You, in fact, did an immeasurable dis-honour to those who lost their lives in those battles, you also disrespected both the veteran community, and the Australian Honours system, and whilst appearing on a world stage for all to see.

You now represent those others of your ilk, the medal cheats and valour thieves, through the award of a perpetual presence on the ANZMI site.

Surname: Batt
Christian Names: Arthur James
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Medowie
Service #: 17623
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

Many services were conducted throughout Australia and New Zealand this year to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan, a significant conflict in Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War.

 

The picture below was taken at such a service, conducted in the small Hunter Valley town of Medowie. Arthur Batt, a local Vietnam veteran is reading a poem during that service.

 

Batt 1 2

 

Batt was a member of the 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment.

In early 1965, the Australian Government agreed to dispatch an infantry battalion to South Vietnam. The leading troops of the 1st Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (1RAR), landed on 3 June in a chartered Qantas aircraft. This was the first use of Qantas charters to move troops into (and out of) South Vietnam, and ‘skippy flights’, as they came to be known, would continue at regular intervals almost until the end of Australia’s commitment to the war. Another significant event occurred on 8 June, when the transport ship (converted aircraft carrier) HMAS Sydney, with destroyer escort HMAS Parramatta and HMAS Duchess, arrived at Vung Tau on the first of what became regular naval logistical support operations.

 

1RAR, the only infantry battalion deployed to Vietnam that was comprised wholly of regular troops, was deployed in Bien Hoa with the US 173rd Airborne Brigade. It was soon built up to a battalion group with artillery, armoured personnel carriers, army aviation and logistical support units. The battalion group saw some heavy fighting, suffering twenty-three men killed during its one-year tour of duty.

For their involvement, they were awarded the US Army Meritorious Unit Commendation, the citation reads:

 

By the direction of the Secretary of the Army, the Meritorious Unit Commendation is awarded to the 1st BATTALION, ROYAL AUSTRALIAN REGIMENT GROUP for exceptionally meritorious achievement in the performance of outstanding service:

The 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, distinguished itself in the conduct of military operation in the Republic of Vietnam from 5 May 1965 to 16 May 1966 while attached to the173rd Airborne Brigade(Separate) of the United States Army.  As the first ground combat unit in-country, the 173rd Airborne Brigade and its assigned and attached units conducted extensive combat manoeuvres in the Bien Hoa area and in the Viet Cong strongholds of War Zone D and the Iron Triangle during the period 5 May 1965 to 4 May 1967.  In every confrontation with the stubborn insurgents, the 173rd Airborne Brigade displayed marked aggressiveness which enabled them to neutralize enemy strongholds and capture thousands of logistical items.  In addition to remarkable skill and tenacity in combat, the sky soldiers of the brigade carried on an extensive civic action program characterised by sincere compassion for the   suppressed local populace.  During each of the brigade's combat operations, the sky soldiers immeasurably aided the allied counterinsurgency effort by winning the hearts and minds of the Vietnamese people.  The remarkable proficiency and devotion to duty displayed by the members of the 173rd Airborne Brigade are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect distinct credit upon themselves, the Armed Forces of the United States, and the Armed Forces of Australian and New Zealand.

The Unit Citation, as shown below, can be worn with pride by those members of 1RAR.

Batt 2

1RAR was relieved by the First Australian Task Force (1ATF) during May-June 1966. It returned to Australia in June.

 

Batt 3

 

After the Medowie memorial service, Batt was photographed and appeared in an online media publication, “News of The Area”. For those of you who have read this article, it refers to Batt having been involved in the Battle of Long Tan, this has been identified as an error on behalf of the reporter, the fact being Batt left Vietnam before this event. This is supported by the below extract from the Vietnam Veterans Nominal Roll, which is available in the public domain.

 

Batt Retraction

 

 

Batt 4

 

In the previous photograph, Batt is wearing the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal (RVCM).

The RVCM was issued by the Government of the Republic of Vietnam for service in the prescribed area of operations in Vietnam during the period commencing on 31 July 1962 and ending on 28 March 1973 for Australian personnel.

 

Batt 5

The Australian Government authorised this medal to be awarded to Australian servicemen and women and, like any award, there is a qualifying criteria.

The Australian government maintained the basic qualifying criteria specified by the Republic of Vietnam for allied troops. To be eligible for the medal a person must have completed a minimum period of 181 days, either continuous or aggregated, unless:

-        killed on active service (KIA);

-        wounded in action i.e. classified as a Battle Casualty and evacuated as a result of those wounds; or

-        captured and later released or escaped.

Medical evacuation from the area of operations for any reasons other than wounds received in action does not constitute an exemption from meeting the minimum qualifying period.

Accordingly, for Batt, the evidence is in, namely:

-        He returned to Australia, along with his Unit, from Vietnam on 01 Jul 1966;

-        He served a total of 173 days in Vietnam; and

-        He was not a casualty of that conflict.

In summary, Batt is not entitled to wear the RVCM. Surely, like all others who have served in the defence forces, Batt understands there are rules and regulations, they are there for a reason and they are ‘black and white’.

To conduct yourself with such disrespect to fellow Veterans, aggravated by the fact you did it on such an occasion, namely the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan, is quite disgraceful and has earned you a place on ANZMI with your fellow fraudsters and honour thieves.

 

Surname: Coombe
Christian Names: Peter Franklin
Country: New Zealand
State or Province: North Island
City or Town: Waipukurau
NZ -Which Island:
  • North Island
Service #: NZ14123
Service: NZ Navy
Branch: Stoker
Commencement of service: 1952
Completion of service: 04 Dec 56
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Coombe  wears ten medals relating to three war zones,

These are the medals he is wearing;

1.  NZ Operational Service Medal - Entitled

2.  Korea Medal - Entitled

3.  UN Korea Medal - Entitled

4.  General Service Medal 1918-62 - Not entitled

5.  Vietnam Medal - Not entitled

6.  Vietnam Campaign Star -. Not entitled

7.  Queens Coronation Medal 1952  - Not entitled

8.  South Korea Campaign Medal - entitled.  New Zealand ex Service persons have permission to wear.

9.  Korean Veterans Medal -officially presented by South Korea to returning veterans or those veterans specially           identified by the Ambassador. Not to be worn with official medals but is a recognised award.

10. Australian Regular Force Medal - Not entitled self purchased "Tin" Medal.

He is entitled to wear only four medals not ten medals

Coombe was born in New Zealand on 17th  February 1935 and served in Korea as a very young man in 1952 with the Royal New Zealand Navy.  He served in Korea waters on board HMNZS Hawea and HMNZS Rotoiti  from August 1952 until March 1953.  He then served on HMNZ ships Black Prince, Bollona and Lachlan until his discharge on 4 December 1956 for being "Below Navy Physical Standards".  (This information was derived from a the New Zealand Korea Nominal Roll completed in 2013 by NZ historian Mr Howard Chamberlain.)

Coombe claims to have served in the New Zealand, United Kingdom and Australian Armed Forces. Whilst he did serve in the NZ Navy, it is very much doubted that he served with UK Forces and there is no record of Coombe ever having served in the Australian Defence Force. If he served in the UK Armed Forces it would be either as a youth of less than seventeen years of age or as a man who had been declared  "Below NZ Navy Physical Standards"

Chronologically, his medals indicate that after Korea he claims to have served in Malaysia, as he is wearing the UK General Service Medal (GSM) 1918 - 1962 which is an Army award. If his Malaysia service was with Australian or UK Navy his entitlement would be Naval GSM 1915 - 1962.

After Malaysia he claims service in Vietnam.  He did not serve in Vietnam with the Australian Defence Force.  He has no Navy file in  National Australia Archives (NAA) and he is not on the Australian Department of Veterans Affairs Vietnam Nominal Roll, nor is he listed on  the New Zealand Vietnam Nominal Roll.  The United Kingdom was not involved in the Vietnam war. 

We contacted Coombe and requested details of his medals entitlement.  He said

 "He no longer had any interest in the matter has sold his medals and had nothing more to say".

Coombe has got away with being a fraud and a  medals cheat for many years and has been seen "sporting" his pot potpourri  of medals on many commemorative occasions

After his service in Korea he has added six false medals to his rack.  He is not a young man but we do not discern when it comes to medals cheats.  He has enjoyed many years of false kudos and in accordance with Newton's law third law he will now have an equal and opposite reaction of shame whilst he reposes on our web site.

Surname: Chant
Christian Names: Christopher Tony
Country: Australia
State or Province: VIC
City or Town: Wodonga
Service #: Unknown
Service: Claims Army Reserve
Branch: Claims RAAC, RAAOC and 8/13 VMR
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Christopher Tony Chant is 48 years of age and is the Superintendent in Charge of the St John Ambulance Service for the Southern Region of New South Wales, Albury, Australia.

He has also been a member of the New South Wales (NSW) State Emergency Service (SES) Murray Region, Albury since 2007.  


 

In the above photograph, Chant is wearing -;
1. The Officer of the Order of St John Medal.
2. The Australian Defence Force Medal.
3. The Service Medal of the Order of St John.

On the 26 January, 2014, Christopher Tony Chant was awarded the Order of Australia Medal (OAM) for "Service to the community of Albury through a range of community organisations"

This also includes 10 years in the Scouting organisation, Rotary, he is also a Marriage Celebrant in the local area and a Justice of the Peace.


Chant, however is a liar and a false pretender. Chant has told colleagues that he was a Lieutenant in the Australian Army Reserves for a period. During his time in the Reserves he claims that - "He came across a serious motor vehicle accident where he saved the lives of a number of people by pulling them out of a car wreck that caught on fire." He then claims that as a result of his actions, a local Member of Parliament recommended him for a bravery award. Below are photographs of Chant wearing the court mounted commendation for brave conduct, in uniform with his Superintendent rank.

The commendation for brave conduct is a gold sprig of mimosa mounted on a blood-red backing ribbon. See photograph below.

The two photographs of Chant below clearly show him wearing the Commendation for Brave Conduct riband that he has never been awarded.


Chant is a fraud and he knows it. We have confirmed that he has never been awarded the commendation for brave conduct. He was never recommended for it. His name does not appear on "Its an Honour" for Australian Awards. His story of saving the lives of people from a burning car wreck is doubtful and has not been verified. Either by Chant or anyone else.

He has deceitfully tried to convince colleagues that he is someone who he is not by purchasing this award and wearing it on his uniform and then telling outright lies as to why he was awarded it.

He has stolen the valour of all the brave men and women who have previously been awarded this prestigious award.

Initially, he was reported to the General Manager of St John for wearing a bravery award that he had never been awarded. An investigation was then conducted. He was told to stop wearing the bravery commendation ribbon by his senior Officer.

However, we have been informed that due to his executive Superintendent position, the matter was covered up and no further action was taken against him due to the embarrassment it would have caused St John Ambulance if the truth was known to the general public.

Since this serious deception and cover up, he has been awarded the Order of Australia Medal (OAM) on the 26 January 2014. This is with the complete knowledge of his superiors who covered up his disgraceful behaviour in wearing a bravery commendation that he was not awarded or entitled to wear.

Chant has claimed Australian Army Reserve Service in the Armoured Corps, Ordnance Corps and the 8/13 Victorian Rifles as a Lieutenant. He wears the Australian Defence Force Medal.

However, we can find no trace of former Lieutenant Christopher Tony Chant DOB 3/12/1967 in the National Archives for Army Reserve Service or Citizens Military Forces.

We contacted Chant twice in writing, requesting details of his Australian Army Reserve Service, service number, rank, dates of service, units etc. and his entitlement to wear the Australian Defence Force Medal and riband.

We also requested information from him regarding the award of the commendation for bravery. On each occasion, we received no response. Now you might think that if he had nothing to hide, he would answer our requests.

Chant is an imposter without credibility. He does not deserve to hold the senior executive positions within St John Ambulance or the SES. He should return his OAM as he is not a fit and proper person to be the recipient of this award.

The NSW Attorney General's Department should also take action regarding Chant being a fit and proper person to hold the office of Justice of the Peace in and for the State of New South Wales.

Imposters like Chant work their way up through organisations by deception and self aggrandisement. Unfortunately, when they gain executive positions and get found out as being imposters, they become an embarrassment to the organisation that promoted them. Hence the cover ups. He should resign his positions immediately and apologise in writing to all the personnel in the organisations that he is affiliated with.

Chant well deserves his place on the ANZMI website, together with Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Flying Officer Graham John Slingsby who was also caught out and photographed wearing the same non earned bravery award on his RAAF uniform.

 

Christopher Tony Chant Update 10 MAY 15

Christopher Tony Chant of the Albury NSW Region has resigned from his position of Superintendent, St John Ambulance Service, Southern Region, New South Wales.

This high profile imposter lived the lie for some time of being a courageous member of the Australian Army Reserves, who rescued a number of people trapped in a burning car accident.

Recently, whilst he was a Superintendent of St John Ambulance Service, his claims of being awarded the Commendation for Brave Conduct in regards to this alleged incident were proven false by Anzmi.

St John Ambulance Service hierarchy had previously investigated this matter and had told Chant not to wear the Bravery Commendation again. They covered up the results of the investigation due to the embarrassment it would have caused the Service due to his high profile and rank.

He was even recommended for, and awarded the Order of Australia Medal following this cover up by St John Ambulance Service.

Incredibly, he was also being considered for the new rank of Assistant Commissioner of a Region in the new restructure of St John Ambulance Service. He was relieving at this rank when he was caught out as an imposter by Anzmi.

The following article is from the Border Mail 5 May, 2015 edition.

Chris Chant resigns, is not replaced
By NATALIE KOTSIOS
May 5, 2015, midnight

 

Chris Chant has resigned from St John Ambulance. The organisation says Mr Chant will not be replaced, with a restructure meaning all regional superintendent positions in NSW will be redundant.

ST John Ambulance NSW’s southern region superintendent Chris Chant has resigned from his post after revelations he falsely claimed a prestigious bravery award.
And the first aid service has confirmed he will not be replaced, as St John’s undergoes a restructure that will see all regional superintendent positions in NSW made redundant.

Mr Chant yesterday confirmed he had left the organisation but refused to go into detail, responding “no comment” to all questions.
The Border Mail reported in March that Mr Chant, 48, had been wearing a bravery award he was not entitled to alongside other military and St John’s service medals.

St John’s conducted an investigation into the Wodonga man last April, but did not disclose this publicly until The Border Mail began asking questions.

Yesterday, St John’s NSW general manager Rod O’Donnell confirmed Mr Chant had resigned but he would not provide any other information on when or why he had stood down.

“I can say Mr Chant is no longer with St John’s,” he said.

Asked when Mr Chant would be replaced, Mr O’Donnell revealed the organisation was undergoing a restructure and all regional superintendent positions were gone.
“Obviously with a restructure that takes a bit of time to bed down, but I can say the position as it was no longer exists,” he said.

Attention was drawn to Mr Chant’s claims after a website devoted to uncovering military imposters said he had claimed he earned a bravery commendation while serving in the Army Reserves after rescuing a number of people from a burning car wreck.

Mr Chant conceded at the time there were “elements of truth” to the allegations, but declined to comment any further.

“It’s a difficult issue ... there’s more to it than that,” he said in March.
“I don’t want to comment ... but there’s two sides to every story.”

Mr Chant’s name does not appear on the online honour roll It’s An Honour for any bravery commendations.

A spokesperson from Government House, which is responsible for all Australian awards, stated: “The Office of the Official Secretary to the Governor-General has no record of Mr Christopher Tony Chant receiving an Australian bravery decoration”.

Mr Chant was awarded the Order of Australia Medal last year for community work, including Rotary, Scouts Australia and work as a civil celebrant.

Just prior to this honour in January last year, he assisted a young woman at the scene of a crash on Wodonga’s Lincoln Causeway.

Our website is full of military and civilian imposters who misrepresent themselves by telling incredible lies to gain an advantage in the workplace over others, undeserved recognition in their social surroundings or gain positions on Ex Service Committees where they are rewarded with cash and other benefits.

Chant , like others, is an example of how far imposters will go to gain that advantage and reap the rewards for their lies.

We are currently in communication with the Governor General’s Office to have Chant’s Order of Australia Medal award revoked.

Hopefully, our next update will confirm this.


 

Surname: Campbell
Christian Names: Jeffrey Steven
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Esk
Service #: 185338
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: 13 Jun 89
Completion of service: 05 Apr 90
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Jeffrey Steven Campbell is from Esk, One Hundred Kilometres West of Brisbane, he is a well know Queensland Fire and Rescue Service (QFRS) Volunteer and when in uniform wears five medals on his left breast contrary to State and Federal medals protocol.

We recently exposed an ex RAN man and two Salvations Army Everyman workers for wearing fake medals and we have had a lot of inane remarks from less than erudite people for exposing "nice people". Frankly we don't give a damn if you are a nice person, a Bishop, RSL President, Politician, Butcher, Baker or Candlestick maker, if you degrade the value of medals by not following protocols and One Hundred years of tradition, we will nail you to our web site as a medals cheat.

Campbell is the epitome of a rural "Mr Nice Guy". However he has a penchant to enhance his image by wearing false medals.


These are what he is wearing:

Australian Centenary Medal (ACM) - Entitled - for work as Volunteer
National Medal (NM) - Entitled - for work as Volunteer
Australian Defence Medal (ADM) - Not entitled
United Nations International Year of Volunteer Medal (UNIYVM - "Tin rubbish"
Emergency Service Medal (ESM) - "Tin rubbish"

Campbell is entitled to wear only two medals on his left breast, they are the Australian Centenary Medal and the National Medal.

The one Defence medal he is wearing is a replica sham. He enlisted into the Army in June 1989 and was discharged in April 1990 as being "Unsuited to be a Soldier". He did not fulfil the criterion as shown below:

How it is awarded

The Governor-General (or his delegate) awards the Australian Defence Medal on the recommendation of the Chief of the Defence Force (or his delegate).
The eligibility criteria requires completion of an initial enlistment period or four years service, whichever is the lesser. The criteria also includes those who could not serve the four-year qualifying period or complete an initial enlistment period for one or more of the following reasons:

the death of a member during service;
the discharge of the member as medically unfit due to compensable impairment;
the discharge of the member due to a prevailing discriminatory Defence policy, as determined by the Chief of the Defence Force or his or her delegate.


The United Nations International Year of Volunteer Medal and the Emergency Service Medal are both self purchased junk that should not be worn at all.

The QFRS is a prestigious well organized and managed institution with a clearly defined medals policy. Here is the essence of their policy:

Campbell is in breach of Federal, State and QFRS medals policy. As stated early in this presentation we take no notice of those who have no respect for protocols and tradition. People like Campbell and the Salvation Army people we recently exposed, wear unearned and worthless medals to falsely enhance their standing in the community. It is deception and dishonour and no decent person would do it.

Jeffery Steven Campbell of Esk in Queensland has earned his place on this web site.

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