Medal Cheats

Medal Cheats

Surname: Boulter
Christian Names: William Charles aka Tony
Country: Australia
State or Province: NT
City or Town: Tennant Creek
Service #: Unknown
Service: Unknown
Branch: Claims Infantry
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

Boulter is one of the worst of the worst.  He is a "Big wheel” in the Northern Territory town of Tennant Creek.  He has been involved in local Government for

many years and has been admired as a Returned Veteran.

Boulter 1 2017 02 10

 

These are the medals he is wearing:

Australian Active Service Medal (AASM)Not entitled

Korea Medal Not entitled

United Nations Korea Service Medal Not entitled

General Service Medal (Clasp Malaysia) Not entitled and worn in the wrong place

Australian Service Medal (Clasp PNG) Not entitled

Australia Defence Medal - Unlikely to be entitled

Commemoration of National Service Medal - Unlikely to be entitled

Papua New Guinea Independence Medal 1975.  Entitlement unknown

Papua New Guinea Anniversary of Independence 1975 - 1985 - Entitlement unknown

Most of his medals are false.

We have a Statutory Declaration detailing what Boulter has said about his service:

"he has stood up stated his name number and rank with the Papua New Guinea Volunteer Rifles (PNGVR) Korea,"   He further said:

"no there were only 4 or 5 of us that volunteered and we made our way up to Malaysia and worked with the Australians. I asked who were you attached to? his reply was. We just joined in with the Australian units and then went to Korea. He states he was in the Battle of Kapyong, He wears Korean medals/Malayan and PNG medals, I asked who issued the Australian medals he straight away said the Australian Government. He is not listed on the Department of Veterans Affairs Nominal Roll as being a Korea Veteran. When asked about this he stated it's because he was PNGVR and not registered with the Australian Army."

Boulter was born in July 1935. He could not have been serving with Papua New Guinea Volunteer Rifles (PNGVR)   "before making his way to Malaysia" as he would have been only Fifteen years of age and could not have enlisted in PNGVR . In any case PNGVR was disbanded after WW2 and reformed in March 1951.  So at Fifteen years of age Boulter would have to joined PNGVR in March 1951, then did some fighting with Australian units in Malaysia before arriving in Korea to fight in the Battle of Kapyong in April 1951 one month later, aged Fifteen years.

 

He also said that "PNGVR personnel were not registered with the Australian Army"  PNGVR was, and until again disbanded in 1973, a unit of the Australian Citizens Military Forces (CMF) and very much part of the Australian Army, Order of Battle. . It was disbanded in 1973 as a lead up to PNG Independence in 1975.

What Boulter says is simply "hogwash" and deceitful lies, these cheats are always way behind Australian Veterans and ANZMI in splicing their lies into actual military facts and history.

The writer had the pleasure of speaking to Boulter on the phone on the 31 January 2017. 

Boulter was asked "what years he had served in PNGVR".  He hummed and hawed and then said "from late 1968 to 1972 when he returned to Australia".  He went back to PNG in 1975 when he claimed to again serve in PNGVR.  The problem is that PNGVR was disbanded in 1973.  What he said, completely disproves his service in Malaysia and Korea and proves the medals he wears are false.  We have been advised that Boulter is listed with the PNGVR Association as having served with PNGVR, however they were unable to advise dates of service.

Over the years he has received much kudos from the falsehood that he is a Returned  Serviceman who served in war zones in Malaysia and Korea and wears all the medals to prove it. Claiming to have been present at the famous Korea Battle of Kapyong  where the 3rd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment brought great credit to the ANZAC spirit through their tenacious fighting is indeed an immoral act. Here is an official Australian War Memorial excerpt:

"3 RAR lost 32 killed in action. Along with its Canadian, British, New Zealand and United States allies, 3 RAR managed to hold the advancing Chinese divisions in the Kapyong River valley for 24 hours, allowing United Nations forces further south to shore up a defensive line. It then successfully conducted a fighting withdrawal to extricate itself from encirclement and rejoin its parent brigade, exemplifying the discipline, courage and skill required to succeed in its mission. For their courageous actions, both 3 RAR and 2nd PPCLI were awarded the Distinguished Unit Citation by the United States Government."

He has his name on the Tennant Creek Returned Services League (RSL) Honour Board.  He is listed in the second row, fourth from the bottom.  We anticipate the Tennant Creek RSL  will remove him from their prestigious Honour Board.

Boulter 2 2017 02 10

 

Boulter was never in Korea and his persona in Tennant Creek for the past 30 years has been a complete sham.  Because of his explanation of  "making his way to Malaysia and working with the Australians" it is a sure certainty that he never served anywhere near an Australian Army unit in  Malaysia or Korea.

There is a definitive Department of Veterans Affairs Nominal Roll that lists all servicemen who served with Australian units in Korea. Boulter is not listed.

A few years ago Tennant Creek, Northern Territory Police charged Mr Jooitson "Dutchy"  Van Asson for falsely wearing Defence medals.  He was found guilty and fined $1,000 and given a twenty  four month good behaviour bond. See here: https://www.anzmi.net/index.php/cheats-thieves/list/alpha/v

Boulter has committed the same offence of falsely claiming to be a returned serviceman and wearing false medals.  We have advised the Tennant Creek Police and will let events unfold.

See the Defence Act 1903 Section VII, Parts 80A and 80B.

PART VII--OFFENCES

     80A.    Falsely representing to be returned soldier, sailor orairman 
     80B.    Improper use of service decorations  
Boulter has had thirty years of false fame as a returned Serviceman.  Doubt that he will enjoy his richly deserved future days as his Resume has turned very sour.

Welcome to the Hall of Shame William Charles (Tony) Boulter, you have used your false military service to gain favour in the Tennant Creek community and deserve your infamy.

Surname: Booth
Christian Names: Ian/Iain Mongomory
Country: Philippines
State or Province: Angeles City
City or Town: Angeles city
Service #: 02407
Service: Royal Australian Navy
Branch: Seaman
Commencement of service: 06 Mar 67
Completion of service: Jun 71
Case Notes:

Iain Booth was born on the 25 April, 1949. In 1967, he enlisted in the Royal Australian Navy as a Cadet Midshipman. In the following years he progressed to Sub Lieutenant. He is a Medals Cheat and a false pretender. Booth wears seven medals. He is entitled to wear four.

Booth1jpg 2018 02 08

Booth1Ajpgjpg 2018 02 08

In the above 2017 Remembrance Day photograph, taken at Angeles City, near Manilla, Phillipines, Booth is wearing the following medals.

1. The Australian Active Serve Medal - (AASM) Entitled.2. Vietnam Medal. (VM) Not entitled
3. Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal. – (VLSM) Entitled.
4. Australian Service Medal. (ASM) Entitled
5. Australian Defence Medal. (ADM)Entitled.
6. U.S Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, with a "Combat V clasp. Not entitled.
7. Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. (RVCM) Not entitled.

Concerns were raised by individuals in Australia and the Phillippines, regarding Australian military medals worn by Booth. He also falsely claimed service on HMAS Hobart, a Royal Australian Navy Destroyer, in June, 1968. ANZMI are in possession of signed statements of fact in regards to lies told by Booth regarding Hobart service, at the time he claims. .

It appears that the medals he wears are not consistent with his actual RAN service. In particular, the VM and the VLSM cannot be worn together. You are issued with one or the other. He has been warned in writing several times by RSL Sub Branch Executives about not conforming with medals protocols and wearing medals he is not entitled to. Booth also made other comments to others about his alleged RAN service that are false.

ANZMI then researched the public records, regarding the Royal Australian Navy career of Ian Booth, as he was known then, and arrived at the same conclusion. He has since changed his first name to "Iain."

ANZMI then communicated with Mr Iain Booth and asked him for a summary of his Naval service and the medals that he wears. His response, inter alia, is below -;

I readily concede that there has been an error in my medal issue and that the VLSM cannot be issued with the Vietnam Medal, but the fact that my medals were all issued and named to me is not my error and I therefore feel that I am entitled to wear them. It would be less than prudent to knowingly wear medals that were supposedly not issued together (unless in error) as this would doubtlessly bring into question my entitlement.

Following that idiotic statement, we believe that Booth not only lives in another country, he lives on another planet.

We should all be glad that the Department of Defence did not send him a Victoria Cross in “error”. With Booth’s view on medals protocol, he would have had that medal court mounted and worn as well, claiming that he is entitled to wear it, as "it was not his error!"

The three medals that Booth and ANZMI know that he is not entitled to wear, are the Vietnam Medal (VM), the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. (RVCM) and the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, with clasp.

1. The Vietnam Medal.


Booth2 2018 02 08



Qualification requirement
Australia

Qualifying service for the Vietnam Medal includes:
• 28 days in ships or craft on inland waters or off the coast of Vietnam.
• One or more days on the posted strength of a unit or formation on land.
• One operational sortie over Vietnam or Vietnamese water by aircrew on the posted strength of a unit.
• Official visits either continuous or aggregate of 30 days.
• One day or more by members of accredited philanthropic organisations attached to Australian forces in an official capacity for full-time duty. between 29 May 1964 and 27 January 1973.


Booth3 2018 02 08


2. The Republic of Vietnam Medal.

Australia

The Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal was awarded to Australian military personnel for service in South Vietnam during the period 31 July 1962 to 28 March 1973. The requirements for the award are: at least 181 days service, either continuous or aggregated, unless killed on active service (KIA); or wounded in action (includes psychological injury)[9] and evacuated (medically evacuated other than being wounded does not meet requirement for medal); or captured and later released or escaped.

Booth blames the Department of Defence for “the error”. He knows that it is wrong, but he fraudulently had the medals court mounted, and wears them on official occasions illegally. If you believe his suspect story that the medals were sent to him "in error". why didn't he just return them.

ANZMI asked Booth if he did actually serve in Vietnam, what period he served, what ship or ships he was a crew member of, and what medals was he actually entitled to? He stated that he was unable to recall unless he looked through his records, that were in a garage somewhere in Australia. After two further requests, Booth did not give any specific details of his Vietnam service, other than to respond "that there are other ships I served on in the operational area."


The below Vietnam War Service Certificate issued, purportedly by the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), indicates that Booth served in Vietnam Waters for 413 days. It lists the following ships that Booth allegedly served on in Vietnam during the qualifying period 1962 to 1973..
1. HMAS Sydney
2. HMAS Parramatta.
3. HMAS Yarra
4. HMAS Hobart
5. CINPAC. (Commander in Chief Pacific)


Booth4AA 2018 02 08 2


The certificate is false. It is a forgery. Only one person could benefit from this forged document. The person who submitted it to the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch.

This certificate was with other documentation submitted to the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch, by Booth, when Booth applied to transfer his membership from Hornsby RSL Sub Branch, Sydney, in November, 2016.. We know that the information that appears on this certificate is false. His name does not appear on any of the published lists of crew members, for the three, 6 month deployments to Vietnam by Hobart.

We have signed statements from members of the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch and Hornsby RSL Sub Branch, detailing that Booth claims that he was on Hobart when it was damaged by 3 missiles from a U.S.A.F aircraft.

This incident occurred on the 17 June, 1968. Two crew members were killed and others injured. Extensive damage was sustained by Hobart and we can all be thankful that there was no greater loss of life to our young men.

Booth, according to his official Navy Record, was posted on Parramatta at that time, and was nowhere near Vietnam as he has claimed. Parramatta was in Singapore Harbour undergoing lengthy repairs, when Booth deceitfully claims he was part of Hobart's crew.


Booth4B


Strangely, the only current Vietnam War Service Certificate for Booth on the DVA Website appears below. There is no mention of ships that Booth served on or dates served.

Vietnam War Service

Veteran Details
Name BOOTH, Ian Montgomery
Service Royal Australian Navy
Service Number O2407
Rank Sub-Lieutenant
Honours None for display


Something is amiss.

ANZMI then received another communication from Booth, where he stated that he served on the following ships on operational service in Vietnam.
-;

Might I suggest that you check my service in the following ships -

HMAS Sydney 1967, 1968
HMAS Parramatta 1968
HMAS Yarra 1969
USS Brinkley Bass 1970
HMAS Sydney 1970 -1971


He does not mention Hobart on this occasion. He also knows that he has been caught out in regards to serving 181 days on Hobart, when it was stationed on the Gun Line, to qualify for the VM and the VCM. He has now substituted Hobart with the USS Brinkley Bass, a United States Navy Destroyer, that served on and off in Vietnam waters for short periods in 1970. According to our research, Booth was never attached to that ship for any period of time. There are no records of him serving on that ship.

He also claims Vietnam service on HMAS Yarra 1969. Yarra did not have qualifying operational service in Vietnam in 1969. It escorted the Aircraft Carrier HMAS Sydney to Vung Tau, Vietnam in the last week of February, 1970. (Ships Record of Proceedings)

We know that Booth did not spend 413 days in the qualifying area of Vietnam, as indicated on his false certificate. He is not entitled to wear the Vietnam medal or the Vietnam Campaign Medal. (181 days or more) His Certificate of Vietnam Service, allegedly issued by the Department of Veterans Affairs is a lie, and Booth knows it.

His National Archives Australia Naval records, indicate that he was posted to the Sydney when it travelled to Vung Tau Harbour, Vietnam, on the 27 December, 1967. The ship arrived at 0700 hours that date and left at 1450hrs. A total of about 8 hours. However, qualifying time is accredited from the time the ship left the last Australian Port of Fremantle until its return to Australia 14 days later. His records disclose that he was also a crew member of Sydney when it sailed to Vietnam in late January, 1968 and spent 7 hours in Vung Tau Harbour on the 3 February, 1968.

Also Booths Naval Record indicates that he was on Parramatta between March and July, 1968. On 9 April, 1968. Parramatta visited Vung Tau Harbour for 9 hours escorting Sydney.

It appears then, that Booth deployed on Sydney in December 1967 and February. 1968, to Vung Tau Harbour and then on Parramatta in April, 1968. That being the case, he is entitled to wear the AASM, and the VLSM for those three trips and accumulated 24 hours in the port of Vung Tau..

He is not entitled to wear the Vietnam medal or the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal.


Booth6jpg 2018 02 08 2


The above medal that he wears between the ADM and the VCM is the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. Booth has added the "Combat V" clasp to the medal that he wears. The medal is awarded for -;

The (U.S) Navy and Marine Corps Commendation medal may be awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the Navy or Marine Corps (including foreign military personnel), distinguishes himself/herself by heroic or meritorious achievement or service. To merit this award, the acts or services must be accomplished or performed in a manner above that normally expected and sufficient to distinguish the individual above those performing similar services as set forth in the following -;

For Meritorious Achievement. Outstanding and worthy of special recognition,

For Meritorious Service. Outstanding and worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal or Air Medal when combat is involved or the Meritorious Service Medal or Air Medal when combat is not involved.

For Acts of Heroism. Worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal when combat is involved or the Navy and Marine Corps Medal when combat is not involved.

No records exist of Booth having been awarded the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. Sadly, he has purchased this medal and awarded to himself..

ANZMI sent Booth an email inquiring about his claim to the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation medal with the Combat V clasp. His response was that he was never awarded a Commendation Medal.

From Booth February 2018 -

"I'm a little confused regarding your statement about my being awarded a Commendation Medal. I have never been awarded one. Perhaps you can enlighten me as to the origin of this"..

We certainly agree with Booth, that "he has never been awarded the medal and clasp" in question. Memory failure perhaps? We think not.

We also have statements from RSL members that Booth has claimed that he was a crew member of the RAN Submarine HMAS Onslow. We know that he underwent Submarine Training, but he was never posted as a crew member to Onslow or any other RAN Submarine. Again, no records exist regarding this claim.


Booth7 2018 02 08 2


For his accumulated 24 hours in Vung Tau Harbour, Vietnam, Booth wears 5 medals. He is entitled to 2. The Australian Active Service Medal (AASM) and the Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal (VLSM) He is also entitled to the Australian Service Medal (ASM) with clasp (FESR) for Far East Strategic Reserve Duty and the Australian Defence Medal. (ADM)

By his own admission, Booth is a Medal Cheat and a False Pretender. His membership for the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch should be cancelled. He also owes them an explanation and an apology. He is a fraud.

Surname: Beren
Christian Names: Arthur Black
Country: New Zealand
State or Province: North Island
City or Town: Kerikeri
NZ -Which Island:
  • North Island
Service #: R63055
Service: RAN
Branch: Electrical
Commencement of service: 08 mar 64
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

Arthur Black Beren (formerly known as Arthur Taiono) was born in the Cook Islands, spending his early years there before moving to Australia, where in 1964, he joined the Royal Australian Navy.

Postings included HMAS Melbourne, HMAS Duchess and HMAS Yarra, involving operational service as part of the Far East Strategic Reserve, and later off Vietnam.

 

WUBeren1

 

The above photograph appeared in several online articles, both in the United States and New Zealand in 2014 and 2015. Arthur can be seen wearing the following medals:

1.       Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75 (entitled)

2.       Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal (entitled)

3.       Australian Service Medal 1945-1975 (entitled)

4.       Regular Forces Service Medal (unofficial ‘tin’ medal)

 

WUBeren2

 

The Regular Forces Service Medal is a commemorative item, more aptly described as ‘junk’. Protocol dictates that such items are never to be worn with official medals and if they are to be worn (though never at an official function), it is on the right breast.

Arthur eventually retired from the RAN and moved to New Zealand, where he is the Honourary Welfare Treasurer of the Kerikeri Returned Services Association (RSA). The wearing of this offensive medal surely denigrates his own service history and his position within the RSA Executive.

The issue here, although seemingly minor, is that Arthur, along with so many others who grace the ANZMI site, have seen fit to add a piece of ‘junk’ to their medal rack to look just that little more impressive and important.

Arthur, if you feel so strongly that you need another medal, ditch that worthless piece of tin. Instead, write to Defence Honours and Awards to receive your Australian Defence Medal, for which you are very much entitled to for your service to Australia.

In the meantime, welcome to the ANZMI site.

Surname: Beasley
Christian Names: Neal Lyndon
Country: Australia
State or Province: Queensland
City or Town: Noosa
Service #: R53761
Service: Royal Australian Navy
Branch: Cook
Commencement of service: 1958
Completion of service: 1978
Case Notes:

 

 

Neal Lyndon Beasley joined the Royal Australian Navy as a Cook in 1958, seeing much sea service in this role, before transferring to Naval Police in 1970. He discharged in 1978, having given 20 years efficient service to his country.

Beasley 1

ANZAC Day 2015, would certainly be a memorable one for Beasley, having been selected by the Department of Veterans Affairs to lay a wreath on behalf of all Australian veterans at the Dawn Service in Villers-Bretonneux, France.

The above photograph appeared online, in “Noosa Today”, on 23 April 2015. The article had an in-depth account of Beasley’s service and how proud he was to be attending the dawn service in France.

Beasley can be seen wearing 10 medals. The first 9, were awarded to him for his service in the Navy, and in particular, operational service in Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and Vietnam. These medals are officially awarded by the Australian Government as part of the long-established honours and awards system.

The last medal is nothing more that tin junk, a medal to commemorate service with the Far East Strategic Reserve (FESR), and usually worn by those wanting to make their row of medals look that little bit more impressive. Service with the FESR was adequately recognised through the official awarding of the Australian Service Medal 1945-75, with clasp ‘FESR’.

Beasley has no cause to be proudly displaying this trinket.

Beasley 2

To all discerning Veterans, the FESR Commemorative is nothing more than a ‘tin’ medal, it has no place with authorised Service medals.

So how did this medal come about? Well, people will collect anything and medals have an attractiveness all of their own, particularly when worn in order to impress others rather than just an official recognition of service to Australia.

This was well set out in the advertising spiel of the organisations who produced the commemorative medal.

“To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the RAN's involvement as an integral part of the Far East Strategic Reserve (FESR), the HMAS Sydney and the VLSV Assoc (Vic) has dedicated this medal to all of those that served on HMAS ships on the FESR.

Ministerial approval was sought and Navy Office have granted an 'Instrument of Consent' to use certain words/letters on the Obverse side of the medal, thereby making it uniquely 'Navy'.

The design of the medal is a very fitting one, with two uniquely naval motifs included in the design. The first, the quarter compass rose, depicts the North West quadrant, signifying the direction of the 'Far East' in relation to Australia. The second is the symbol of a canted and fouled stockless anchor, superimposed with a scroll signifying the RAN's involvement in the FESR from 1955 until its disbandment in 1971. The wreath beneath the anchor crown is representative of the eucalypt leaves of the Australian bush, and is in tribute to the memory of those that did not return from this service to their country.

 The recipient of this medal, whose name appears on the Reverse side, served on the Far East Station in an RAN ship which was a unit of the Commonwealth Strategic Reserve. And in the fine traditions of the Royal Australian Navy, they served Australia well.”

In the above, words like ‘Ministerial, and ‘consent’ and ‘uniquely Navy’, seem to add a pretext of authority to the medal, detracting from what it actually is – an unofficial, worthless piece of metal that simply has no place in military medal history.

Defence Honours and Awards policy dictates specifically that such medals are never to be worn with official medals, a policy that is even reflected on the HMAS Sydney Association website and many other Navy and Military association pages.

Beasley 3 2017 05 26

The ANZAC Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux, France.

On 25 April 2015, thousands of Australians, New Zealanders and French attended the Dawn Service at Villers-Bretonneux. The service was broadcast across the world by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and copies of the video are available on Youtube and many commemorative sites.

Beasley 4

The above image was extracted from the broadcast video at the 46 minutes and 13 seconds point, where Beasley is preparing to lay the wreath on behalf of all Australian veterans. Beasley is still wearing the FESR ‘rubbish’ along with his medals.

Neal Lyndon Beasley, do not feel proud for that day, instead, hang your head in shame for your actions. You, in fact, did an immeasurable dis-honour to those who lost their lives in those battles, you also disrespected both the veteran community, and the Australian Honours system, and whilst appearing on a world stage for all to see.

You now represent those others of your ilk, the medal cheats and valour thieves, through the award of a perpetual presence on the ANZMI site.

Surname: Batt
Christian Names: Arthur James
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Medowie
Service #: 17623
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

Many services were conducted throughout Australia and New Zealand this year to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan, a significant conflict in Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War.

 

The picture below was taken at such a service, conducted in the small Hunter Valley town of Medowie. Arthur Batt, a local Vietnam veteran is reading a poem during that service.

 

Batt 1 2

 

Batt was a member of the 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment.

In early 1965, the Australian Government agreed to dispatch an infantry battalion to South Vietnam. The leading troops of the 1st Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (1RAR), landed on 3 June in a chartered Qantas aircraft. This was the first use of Qantas charters to move troops into (and out of) South Vietnam, and ‘skippy flights’, as they came to be known, would continue at regular intervals almost until the end of Australia’s commitment to the war. Another significant event occurred on 8 June, when the transport ship (converted aircraft carrier) HMAS Sydney, with destroyer escort HMAS Parramatta and HMAS Duchess, arrived at Vung Tau on the first of what became regular naval logistical support operations.

 

1RAR, the only infantry battalion deployed to Vietnam that was comprised wholly of regular troops, was deployed in Bien Hoa with the US 173rd Airborne Brigade. It was soon built up to a battalion group with artillery, armoured personnel carriers, army aviation and logistical support units. The battalion group saw some heavy fighting, suffering twenty-three men killed during its one-year tour of duty.

For their involvement, they were awarded the US Army Meritorious Unit Commendation, the citation reads:

 

By the direction of the Secretary of the Army, the Meritorious Unit Commendation is awarded to the 1st BATTALION, ROYAL AUSTRALIAN REGIMENT GROUP for exceptionally meritorious achievement in the performance of outstanding service:

The 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, distinguished itself in the conduct of military operation in the Republic of Vietnam from 5 May 1965 to 16 May 1966 while attached to the173rd Airborne Brigade(Separate) of the United States Army.  As the first ground combat unit in-country, the 173rd Airborne Brigade and its assigned and attached units conducted extensive combat manoeuvres in the Bien Hoa area and in the Viet Cong strongholds of War Zone D and the Iron Triangle during the period 5 May 1965 to 4 May 1967.  In every confrontation with the stubborn insurgents, the 173rd Airborne Brigade displayed marked aggressiveness which enabled them to neutralize enemy strongholds and capture thousands of logistical items.  In addition to remarkable skill and tenacity in combat, the sky soldiers of the brigade carried on an extensive civic action program characterised by sincere compassion for the   suppressed local populace.  During each of the brigade's combat operations, the sky soldiers immeasurably aided the allied counterinsurgency effort by winning the hearts and minds of the Vietnamese people.  The remarkable proficiency and devotion to duty displayed by the members of the 173rd Airborne Brigade are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect distinct credit upon themselves, the Armed Forces of the United States, and the Armed Forces of Australian and New Zealand.

The Unit Citation, as shown below, can be worn with pride by those members of 1RAR.

Batt 2

1RAR was relieved by the First Australian Task Force (1ATF) during May-June 1966. It returned to Australia in June.

 

Batt 3

 

After the Medowie memorial service, Batt was photographed and appeared in an online media publication, “News of The Area”. For those of you who have read this article, it refers to Batt having been involved in the Battle of Long Tan, this has been identified as an error on behalf of the reporter, the fact being Batt left Vietnam before this event. This is supported by the below extract from the Vietnam Veterans Nominal Roll, which is available in the public domain.

 

Batt Retraction

 

 

Batt 4

 

In the previous photograph, Batt is wearing the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal (RVCM).

The RVCM was issued by the Government of the Republic of Vietnam for service in the prescribed area of operations in Vietnam during the period commencing on 31 July 1962 and ending on 28 March 1973 for Australian personnel.

 

Batt 5

The Australian Government authorised this medal to be awarded to Australian servicemen and women and, like any award, there is a qualifying criteria.

The Australian government maintained the basic qualifying criteria specified by the Republic of Vietnam for allied troops. To be eligible for the medal a person must have completed a minimum period of 181 days, either continuous or aggregated, unless:

-        killed on active service (KIA);

-        wounded in action i.e. classified as a Battle Casualty and evacuated as a result of those wounds; or

-        captured and later released or escaped.

Medical evacuation from the area of operations for any reasons other than wounds received in action does not constitute an exemption from meeting the minimum qualifying period.

Accordingly, for Batt, the evidence is in, namely:

-        He returned to Australia, along with his Unit, from Vietnam on 01 Jul 1966;

-        He served a total of 173 days in Vietnam; and

-        He was not a casualty of that conflict.

In summary, Batt is not entitled to wear the RVCM. Surely, like all others who have served in the defence forces, Batt understands there are rules and regulations, they are there for a reason and they are ‘black and white’.

To conduct yourself with such disrespect to fellow Veterans, aggravated by the fact you did it on such an occasion, namely the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan, is quite disgraceful and has earned you a place on ANZMI with your fellow fraudsters and honour thieves.

 

Surname: Coombe
Christian Names: Peter Franklin
Country: New Zealand
State or Province: North Island
City or Town: Waipukurau
NZ -Which Island:
  • North Island
Service #: NZ14123
Service: NZ Navy
Branch: Stoker
Commencement of service: 1952
Completion of service: 04 Dec 56
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Coombe  wears ten medals relating to three war zones,

These are the medals he is wearing;

1.  NZ Operational Service Medal - Entitled

2.  Korea Medal - Entitled

3.  UN Korea Medal - Entitled

4.  General Service Medal 1918-62 - Not entitled

5.  Vietnam Medal - Not entitled

6.  Vietnam Campaign Star -. Not entitled

7.  Queens Coronation Medal 1952  - Not entitled

8.  South Korea Campaign Medal - entitled.  New Zealand ex Service persons have permission to wear.

9.  Korean Veterans Medal -officially presented by South Korea to returning veterans or those veterans specially           identified by the Ambassador. Not to be worn with official medals but is a recognised award.

10. Australian Regular Force Medal - Not entitled self purchased "Tin" Medal.

He is entitled to wear only four medals not ten medals

Coombe was born in New Zealand on 17th  February 1935 and served in Korea as a very young man in 1952 with the Royal New Zealand Navy.  He served in Korea waters on board HMNZS Hawea and HMNZS Rotoiti  from August 1952 until March 1953.  He then served on HMNZ ships Black Prince, Bollona and Lachlan until his discharge on 4 December 1956 for being "Below Navy Physical Standards".  (This information was derived from a the New Zealand Korea Nominal Roll completed in 2013 by NZ historian Mr Howard Chamberlain.)

Coombe claims to have served in the New Zealand, United Kingdom and Australian Armed Forces. Whilst he did serve in the NZ Navy, it is very much doubted that he served with UK Forces and there is no record of Coombe ever having served in the Australian Defence Force. If he served in the UK Armed Forces it would be either as a youth of less than seventeen years of age or as a man who had been declared  "Below NZ Navy Physical Standards"

Chronologically, his medals indicate that after Korea he claims to have served in Malaysia, as he is wearing the UK General Service Medal (GSM) 1918 - 1962 which is an Army award. If his Malaysia service was with Australian or UK Navy his entitlement would be Naval GSM 1915 - 1962.

After Malaysia he claims service in Vietnam.  He did not serve in Vietnam with the Australian Defence Force.  He has no Navy file in  National Australia Archives (NAA) and he is not on the Australian Department of Veterans Affairs Vietnam Nominal Roll, nor is he listed on  the New Zealand Vietnam Nominal Roll.  The United Kingdom was not involved in the Vietnam war. 

We contacted Coombe and requested details of his medals entitlement.  He said

 "He no longer had any interest in the matter has sold his medals and had nothing more to say".

Coombe has got away with being a fraud and a  medals cheat for many years and has been seen "sporting" his pot potpourri  of medals on many commemorative occasions

After his service in Korea he has added six false medals to his rack.  He is not a young man but we do not discern when it comes to medals cheats.  He has enjoyed many years of false kudos and in accordance with Newton's law third law he will now have an equal and opposite reaction of shame whilst he reposes on our web site.

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