Medal Cheats

Medal Cheats

Surname: Robinson
Christian Names: Richard John
Country: Australia
State or Province: WA
City or Town: Boulder
Service #: 5717150
Service: Army
Branch: RAE
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

Richard John Robinson hales from Boulder in the Gold Fields of Western Australia.

RobinsonRich 1 2017 01 26

 

RobinsonRich 2 2017 01 26

 

Robinson was a National Serviceman who claims he served in Vietnam, hence the array of six medals.

The photograph is a bit "blurry" but we believe he is wearing:

Australian Active Service Medal - Not entitled, was never on active service.
Vietnam Medal - Not entitled never served in Vietnam
National Medal - Entitled for work with Fire Brigade
Australian Defence Medal - Entitled
Commemoration of National Service Medal - Entitled
Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal - Not entitled never served in Vietnam.

For many years Robinson has been spinning his Vietnam yarns around the Gold Fields. From the quality of what he says most veterans realize that he is a liar, cheat and wannabe, however generally, citizens of the area believe he is a returned Serviceman, which he is not.

To prove his "story" he claims in the local paper that he met a now deceased Gold Fields man in Saigon whilst serving in Vietnam. There is no evidence in any official government nominal rolls to show that either Robinson or the person he has named ever served in Vietnam.

The newspaper article is of poor quality, but here is what was said:

"Long time friend Rich Robinson will be attending todays shoot to honour his mate who he first met in Saigon whilst on National Service. He was on leave and someone said there is a guy from Kalgoorlie over there."Robinson said he came over and introduced himself and we spoke for a while. One day I walked into the Boulder ex Servicemens Club and there he was. We have been mates ever since.""

We sent Robinson a letter requesting information about his service. We have not received a reply.

"Mr Richard John Robinson 9 May 2016
xxxxxxxxxx Street
Boulder WA 6432Dear Mr RobinsonOur organisation works on behalf of Australian and New Zealand Defence Force Veterans.We have been advised that you are a well known Vietnam Veteran, however we have been unable to find any evidence of your service.We have no leanings one way or the other and therefore thought it best to ask you direct to advise about your service. This matter will be easily resolved on receipt of details from you.Please respond to the above email address before the 17th May 2016.Should you not answer we will proceed without your input.Sincerely
Bill Hobson
ANZMI"


Robinson claims service with Army Small Ships, these ships worked in Vietnam waters and also carried supplies from Australia to Vietnam. See detailed information here:

pronto.au104.org/Pronto_Book/ProntoSVN_CH5-3_2013.pdf

We made and enquiry to 32 Small Ship Squadron Association and below is the reply we received.

"Hi Bill,
Thank you for your enquiry. We have no record of Richard John Robinson as having served in 32 Small Ship Squadron or Vietnam.
I hope you nail him if he is an impostor (he is the second person you have identified who has claimed to have served in 32 and Vietnam).
All the best,
xxxxx"


We will advise the Boulder police that Robinson is illegally wearing Defence medals which is an offence against the Defence Act 1903 and has a maximum penalty of a fine of $3,300 or six months imprisonment or both. Throughout Australia, State Police have successfully prosecuted many wannabes under this legislation

We ask Gold Fields Veterans to keep a watch for Robinson on commemorative occasions and if seen, tell him to remove the Vietnam medals and depart the event.

We however, are pleased to welcome Robinson to our website as another liar, cheat and wannabe. The ex Service community is very large and wide spread, if you are faking your military service it is most likely that you will be noticed and end up with Robinson and the hundreds of other guests reposing on our website.

Surname: Woolfe
Christian Names: Frank
Country: Australia
State or Province: South Australia
City or Town: Port Augusta
Service #: Not Known
Service: Army
Branch: RAE
Commencement of service: 1980
Completion of service: 1988
Case Notes:

 

 

Frank Woolfe served for 8 years in the Australian Army in the Royal Australian Engineers. (RAE). At the completion of his service, he was awarded the Australian Defence Medal for his 8 years service. (ADM)

He is currently a senior member of the State Emergency Service, South Australia (SES) at Port Augusta.

Woolfe’s Face Book page has numerous photographs of himself in SES and Coast Guard uniforms wearing medals and ribbons. He likes to be photographed in uniform.

 

Woolfe


In the above photograph, Woolfe wears on the left side the -;

1. Australian Defence Medal. Entitled.
2. The United Nations International Year of the Volunteer Medal. Tin commemorative.

In what appears to be an escalating problem for the State Emergency Service in South Australia, Woolfe has acquired the United Nations International Year of the Volunteer Medal and added it to his ADM., on the left side.

He has also acquired the unofficial ribbon that accompanied this medal and attached that to his one genuine ribbon. (below)

 

Woolfe2




The United Nations International Year of the Volunteer Medal is an unofficial tin commemorative medal. It can be purchased on line for 58 Australian dollars on eBay or from a Medal Dealer. Woolfe has spent an additional 60 Australian Dollars to have the tin medal court mounted with his DFM., to add that extra bit of glamour to his uniform.

The medal is not recognised by the Australian Government at It’s an Honour for Australian awards.

If worn, it should be placed on the right side with other commemorative medals and not added to or mixed with genuinely awarded National medals worn on the left.

 
Woolfe3



The South Australia State Emergency Service Dress Code states the following -;

EMBELLISHMENT AND INSIGNIA.
DECORATIONS AND MEDALS.


Decorations and Medals and medal ribbons may be worn on Service Dress, shirts or dress uniform on the left breast immediately above any fitted pocket. Medal and award ribbons are worn with service dress, with the wearing of actual medals reserved for official or ceremonial occasions. Medals/awards not recognised by the Australian Award Medal Schedule will be worn on the right side above pocket.[/b]

Woolfe is a senior member of the State Emergency Service, South Australia. He is blatantly disregarding his own Service Medals Wearing Protocols, to make his medal array more attractive. He sets a bad example for the younger members of the SES.

He has been contacted regarding his inappropriate wearing of the medal. His reply was that if it is good enough for the Chief Officer of the SASES (South Australia State Emergency Service) to wear it on the left side, then it is good enough for me. We have that comment in writing.

Woolfe is a disrespectful wannabe and a medal cheat. He disrespects Honours and Awards in wearing a tin trinket. He also disrespects all those current and former military service personnel, who have earned the right to wear National awarded medals on the left side the hard way.

Our message is simple to South Australia State Emergency Service personnel. If you wear unofficial tin medals on your left side, there is a very good chance you will see your photograph in uniform with tin medals on this website.

As an aside, and in response to Woolfe’s claim that the Chief Officer, SASES wears the identical tin trinket on the left side, we have viewed numerous photographs and videos of Chris Beattie, Chief Officer, SASES. In each photograph, he does not wear this medal or ribbon.

Woolfe is a self confessed medal cheat. He also distorts the truth when it suits him.

It is obvious that Mr Chris Beattie needs to have a serious chat with him.

Credibility - Make up your own mind!!

Surname: French
Christian Names: Michael
Country: Australia
State or Province: TAS
City or Town: Circular Head
Service #: 61944
Service: Army
Branch: RAsigs
Commencement of service: 1968
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

Michael French was born in Hobart on the 15 September, 1948. He is a resident of Circular Head, a small town in North West Tasmania. French is a Medals Cheat.

 

French M1




In the above photograph, taken in August, 2016, French is wearing the following medals -;

1. Australian Active Service Medal 1945 – 1975, (AASM 45-75) clasp Vietnam. Entitled.
2. Vietnam Medal. (VM) Entitled.
3. Australian Defence Medal. (ADM) Entitled.
4. Vietnam Campaign Medal. (VCM) Entitled.
5. Regular Force Service Medal. Tin junk medal, purchased.
6. Army Service Medal. Tin junk medal, purchased.

French enlisted in the Australian Army as a regular soldier in 1968. Following completion of his recruit training he was posted to the Royal Australian Corps of Signals. Following Corps training, French was posted to the Republic of South Vietnam on the 9 July, 1970 with 104 Signals Squadron. He returned to Australia on the 1 May, 1971.

As a result of his service, he was appropriately awarded the above AASM 45-75 clasp Vietnam, VM, ADM and VCM. The same as everyone else who served for six months or more in Vietnam.

However, French, for his own egotistical reasons, has decided to purchase two extra medals and have them court mounted with his original medals. The court mounting would have also cost French about $200.00.

The last two medals are tin worthless trinkets that should not be worn on the left side with genuine awarded medals. They are purchased adornments that have no standing whatsoever for military service in the Australian Defence Force.

They are -;

1. Regular Force Service Medal. Purchase price. $70.00. (RSM Awards)
2. Army Service Medal. Purchase Price $140.00.(English Tie and Medal Company)

These Medal Manufacturers make a lot of money plying their trade and selling tin medals to gullible and vain Australians who like to increase their rack for no other reason than to impress people.

Non ex-service individuals would have no idea that French wears two tin purchased medals on his impressive rack.

We say to Mr. French, you have been amply rewarded for your respected military service. Get rid of the tin.

Surname: Dey
Christian Names: Victor Albert
Country: Australia
State or Province: Victoria
City or Town: Bundoora
Service #: 31529
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Approx 1950
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

Victor Albert Dey was born on Anzac Day, 25 April, 1930. He is currently the National President of the Korea Veterans Association of Australia. (KVAA)

Dey served with 3 Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment in Korea. He served in Korea from the 7 June, 1952 until the 9 June, 1953.

 

Dey1

 

 

Dey2jpg



In the above photographs Dey is wearing the following medals. The last two medals on his rack are tin trinkets.

1. Medal of the Order of Australia. (OAM)
2. Australian Active Service Medal 1945 -1975 clasp Korea. (AASM 45-75)
3. Korea Medal.
4. United Nations Service Medal for Korea.
5. Australian Service Medal. 1945 – 1975. Clasp unknown. (ASM 45-75)
6. Australian Defence Medal.
7. The Republic of Korea War Service Medal. - Tin purchased.
8. Korean Ambassador for Peace Medal. – Tin purchased.

 

Dey3



The above is the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Dey4




The above is the Korean Ambassador for Peace Medal.

The adornment worn around his neck is an unofficial Korean special military coin, with ribbon. It was initially introduced in the United States as a commemorative gesture to those who served in Korea. It can be purchased for about 50 US dollars.

Dey has been the President of the KVAA for many years. We have been reliably informed that Dey has continued to wear the tin trinket medals during his time as President of the Association, even ignoring advice, that if worn at all, they should be worn on the right, with other commemorative medals.

As a result of this and other dissention within the KVAA , 60 Korean Veterans resigned from Dey’s Association and formed their own Korea Veteran’s Sub Branch of the Victorian Returned and Services League. (R&SL.)

Dey, as National President of the Korea Veterans Association of Australia is setting a bad example for his committee and members.

There are numerous members of the Association he is President of that wear these tin trinkets. Quite a few appear on this site.

Dey has been appropriately rewarded for his valuable service in Korea, and he should be proud to have been awarded and wear the three genuine medals issued for that conflict.

Surname: Batt
Christian Names: Arthur James
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Medowie
Service #: 17623
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

Many services were conducted throughout Australia and New Zealand this year to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan, a significant conflict in Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War.

 

The picture below was taken at such a service, conducted in the small Hunter Valley town of Medowie. Arthur Batt, a local Vietnam veteran is reading a poem during that service.

 

Batt 1 2

 

Batt was a member of the 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment.

In early 1965, the Australian Government agreed to dispatch an infantry battalion to South Vietnam. The leading troops of the 1st Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (1RAR), landed on 3 June in a chartered Qantas aircraft. This was the first use of Qantas charters to move troops into (and out of) South Vietnam, and ‘skippy flights’, as they came to be known, would continue at regular intervals almost until the end of Australia’s commitment to the war. Another significant event occurred on 8 June, when the transport ship (converted aircraft carrier) HMAS Sydney, with destroyer escort HMAS Parramatta and HMAS Duchess, arrived at Vung Tau on the first of what became regular naval logistical support operations.

 

1RAR, the only infantry battalion deployed to Vietnam that was comprised wholly of regular troops, was deployed in Bien Hoa with the US 173rd Airborne Brigade. It was soon built up to a battalion group with artillery, armoured personnel carriers, army aviation and logistical support units. The battalion group saw some heavy fighting, suffering twenty-three men killed during its one-year tour of duty.

For their involvement, they were awarded the US Army Meritorious Unit Commendation, the citation reads:

 

By the direction of the Secretary of the Army, the Meritorious Unit Commendation is awarded to the 1st BATTALION, ROYAL AUSTRALIAN REGIMENT GROUP for exceptionally meritorious achievement in the performance of outstanding service:

The 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, distinguished itself in the conduct of military operation in the Republic of Vietnam from 5 May 1965 to 16 May 1966 while attached to the173rd Airborne Brigade(Separate) of the United States Army.  As the first ground combat unit in-country, the 173rd Airborne Brigade and its assigned and attached units conducted extensive combat manoeuvres in the Bien Hoa area and in the Viet Cong strongholds of War Zone D and the Iron Triangle during the period 5 May 1965 to 4 May 1967.  In every confrontation with the stubborn insurgents, the 173rd Airborne Brigade displayed marked aggressiveness which enabled them to neutralize enemy strongholds and capture thousands of logistical items.  In addition to remarkable skill and tenacity in combat, the sky soldiers of the brigade carried on an extensive civic action program characterised by sincere compassion for the   suppressed local populace.  During each of the brigade's combat operations, the sky soldiers immeasurably aided the allied counterinsurgency effort by winning the hearts and minds of the Vietnamese people.  The remarkable proficiency and devotion to duty displayed by the members of the 173rd Airborne Brigade are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect distinct credit upon themselves, the Armed Forces of the United States, and the Armed Forces of Australian and New Zealand.

The Unit Citation, as shown below, can be worn with pride by those members of 1RAR.

Batt 2

1RAR was relieved by the First Australian Task Force (1ATF) during May-June 1966. It returned to Australia in June.

 

Batt 3

 

After the Medowie memorial service, Batt was photographed and appeared in an online media publication, “News of The Area”. For those of you who have read this article, it refers to Batt having been involved in the Battle of Long Tan, this has been identified as an error on behalf of the reporter, the fact being Batt left Vietnam before this event. This is supported by the below extract from the Vietnam Veterans Nominal Roll, which is available in the public domain.

 

Batt Retraction

 

 

Batt 4

 

In the previous photograph, Batt is wearing the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal (RVCM).

The RVCM was issued by the Government of the Republic of Vietnam for service in the prescribed area of operations in Vietnam during the period commencing on 31 July 1962 and ending on 28 March 1973 for Australian personnel.

 

Batt 5

The Australian Government authorised this medal to be awarded to Australian servicemen and women and, like any award, there is a qualifying criteria.

The Australian government maintained the basic qualifying criteria specified by the Republic of Vietnam for allied troops. To be eligible for the medal a person must have completed a minimum period of 181 days, either continuous or aggregated, unless:

-        killed on active service (KIA);

-        wounded in action i.e. classified as a Battle Casualty and evacuated as a result of those wounds; or

-        captured and later released or escaped.

Medical evacuation from the area of operations for any reasons other than wounds received in action does not constitute an exemption from meeting the minimum qualifying period.

Accordingly, for Batt, the evidence is in, namely:

-        He returned to Australia, along with his Unit, from Vietnam on 01 Jul 1966;

-        He served a total of 173 days in Vietnam; and

-        He was not a casualty of that conflict.

In summary, Batt is not entitled to wear the RVCM. Surely, like all others who have served in the defence forces, Batt understands there are rules and regulations, they are there for a reason and they are ‘black and white’.

To conduct yourself with such disrespect to fellow Veterans, aggravated by the fact you did it on such an occasion, namely the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan, is quite disgraceful and has earned you a place on ANZMI with your fellow fraudsters and honour thieves.

 

Surname: Cullum
Christian Names: Kenneth
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Cleveland
Service #: 714379
Service: Army
Branch: Artillery
Commencement of service: 03 Jan 1955
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

Kenneth Colin Cullum never saw active service, however he was called up for National Service and trained in artillery. He continued his service to the country and community through various organisations. In 2000, he was awarded the Emergency Services Medal for his service with Queensland State Emergency Service (QLD SES).

Cullum has also held executive positions in ex-Service organisations, his most recent, as Secretary of the National Servicemen’s Association of Queensland, Redlands Branch.

One would think that after many year’s involvement in such organisations, Cullum would be aware of medal protocols, or he simply chose to ignore them, as the following illustrates.

Cullum 1 2

The above photograph was taken at the 2015 Remembrance Day service at Redlands, Queensland.

Cullum 2

 

Cullum is wearing the following medals:

1. Emergency Services Medal – awarded in 2000 for service to the QLD SES.

2. National Medal – entitlement unknown as the medal was never officially awarded.

3. Australian Defence Medal – entitled.

4. Anniversary of National Service Medal – entitled.

5. International Year of the Volunteer Medal – an unofficial commemorative medal and not to be worn with official medals.

 

CullumNASHROLL

 

 

 

Cullum 3

 

The National Medal was established on 14 February 1975 as one of the original elements of the distinctive Australian system of honours and awards. The Medal recognises long and diligent service in organisations that protect life and property at some risk to their members. Many, but not all, eligible groups are uniformed. The Medal is awarded to persons for long service in eligible organisations who fulfil the primary function and meet other criteria. Fifteen year’s eligible service is necessary to qualify for the Medal. Clasps are available for each additional 10-year period.

The Governor-General awards the National Medal. Nominations are made by the chief officer of the nominee’s organisation. The chief officer of each approved organisation also administers the medal for that organisation. The award recognises long service in approved organisations that protect life and property at some risk to their members. Many, but not all, eligible groups are uniformed. Fifteen years’ service is required to qualify. Clasps are available for each additional ten years’ service.

Cullum may very well have qualified for the award of the National Medal, by virtue of his service with the QLD SES, however, until the medal is applied for in the correct manner and approved for issue, then he is not entitled to wear it.

Cullum 4

 

The above shows the result of a search of the Australian Honours and Awards database. Cullum has been awarded the Emergency Services Medal, but not the National Medal.

Cullum 5

The United Nations (UN) passed a resolution on December 2000 declaring that 2001 would be the International Year of Volunteers (IYV). This resolution adopted by the General Assembly was endorsed and co-sponsored by 60 countries, including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Malta and The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

The colours of the ribbon depict the light blue, being the Internationally recognised colour of the United Nations Medal and the orange, being the colour for the International Year of Volunteer Medal.

In short, this is not an official medal, it is no more than a decorative trinket and is not to be worn with official medals.

Kenneth Colin Cullum, you have had an outstanding life of community service, for which you have been appropriately recognised. However, your actions in respect of your medals has sullied this service, disrespected veterans and, perhaps, even disrespected yourself.

The fact that your actions took place whilst an executive member of an ex-Service organisation compounds your culpability and casts a cloud over those organisations that continually turn a blind eye to such practices. You are now among like-minded colleagues on the ANZMI website.

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