Medal Cheats

Medal Cheats

Surname: Everitt
Christian Names: Gary Ronald
Country: Australia
State or Province: Unknown
City or Town: Unknown
Case Notes:

Gary Ronald Everitt – Army sailor
 
Everitt is a medals cheat. He wears a Vietnam Campaign Medal (VCM) that was not issued to him, and therefore he would have purchased the medal to deliberately infer that he had served the required time in Vietnam.

 
 


 
The instructions regarding the entitlement to wear this medal are concise:
 
Eligibility

 
"The Australian government maintained the basic qualifying criteria specified by the Republic of Vietnam for allied troops. To be eligible for the medal a person must have completed a minimum period of 181 days, either continuous or aggregated, unless: killed on active service (KIA);wounded in action i.e. classified as a Battle Casualty and evacuated as a result of those wounds; or  captured and later released or escaped."
 
Everitt served on the Army Vessel AV 1356 Clive Steele on a Voyage where the last port of call in Australia was Townsville, Queensland. Army Ships and  Royal Australian Navy Ships counted their Vietnam service from the date of departure from the last port in Australia. AV Clive Steel departed Townsville on the 29th January 1968 and arrived, Vung Tau, Vietnam on the 12 February 1968. On arrival in Vietnam the AV Clive Steele and crew remained in Vietnam as part of 32 Small Ship Squadron. Everitt departed Vietnam on a QANTAS Charter Flight on 2nd July 1968 posted to 30 Terminal Squadron in Sydney until his discharge on 18th April 1969 having completed his National Service obligation.


 


The above documentary evidence proves that Everitt did not meet the 181 day criterion, even including the journey time from Townsville to Vietnam waters. His service was for less than 160 days and Everitt has awarded himself the VCM to add a little weight to his legitimate rack.
 
From now on Everitt need never worry again about being “outed” as a medals cheat, because we have comprehensively completed the task on behalf of honest Australian and New Zealand Veterans.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from private citizens are supported by statements of fact and statutory declarations.

Surname: Thompson
Christian Names: Ralph George
Country: Australia
State or Province: Queensland
City or Town: Surfers Paradise
Case Notes:

Ralph George THOMPSON 38506 joined the Australian Army and did one tour with 5 Battalion Royal Australian Regiment. On the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Vietnam Nominal Roll he is not marked as being a National Servicemen that is because he did National Service in the 1950’s.

The year the photo was taken Thompson was the Vice President of the Surfers Paradise RSL: Sub-Branch. He is now a committee member.

Ralph Thompson is entitled to the Commemorative Anniversary of National Service Medal which he wears with his other official awards. The last medal he should not be wearing is the un-official bought National Service Medal which we refer to as Tin Medals.

This is the official Anniversary National Service Medal

The un-official National service Medal that he should not be wearing.

Like others that appear on this page, Thompson shows a lack of respect to other veterans by wearing an un-official medal. You could get the impression that these ex-servicemen that wear all these un-official medals are trying to make themselves look like heroes by the number of medals they wear.

The younger veterans are awake to the number of older ex-servicemen that are wearing tin medals and are disgusted by it.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from the private citizens are supported by statement of fact and statutory declarations.

Surname: Auston
Christian Names: Robert Barry
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Sydney
Case Notes:

Robert Barry AUSTON R55973 President of the HMAS Sydney Association when this photo was taken at the Long Tan Day Commemoration Ceremony on 18 August 2011 in Sydney (now known as Vietnam Veterans Day).  

Robert AUSTON served with the Royal Australian Navy during the Vietnam War and did eight trips to Vung Tau for short periods, one trip on HMAS Melbourne, the others on HMAS Sydney.

Though the ships only spent a short period of time in the port at Vung Tau, not even a day, the trips were counted in days from the time the ship left Australia till it returned.

In the photo he is wearing on his left breast two un-official tin medals which were bought and not awarded. These medals if worn should be on the right breast.

The medals have been positively identified as the Australian Logistic Support Force Medal and the HMAS Sydney Medal.

It would appear just about every sailor that served on the troopship HMAS Sydney wears that tin medal. It was never awarded by the Defence Department.

Some years after the war ceased the Vietnam Logistic Support Medal was struck and awarded for these short trips and visits by other defence and civilian personnel.

By wearing un-official bought medals these ex-servicemen are showing a total disregard for the order of wearing medals and a lack of respect to other veterans.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from the private citizens are supported by statement of fact and statutory declarations.

Surname: Fewson
Christian Names: Ronald Bruce
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Beenleigh
Case Notes:

Ronald Bruce FEWSON is involved with the Beenleigh RSL situated just north of the Gold Coast and like a number of other veterans wears un-official commemorative medals with his official medals.

He served in World War 2 with the Royal Australian Air Force, discharged in1949 and enlisted with the  Australian Army and served in the Korean War with 3 Battalion Royal Australian Regiment. Like a number of veterans from all wars, he is not happy with just wearing his official medals on his left breast but has added un-official medals to them.

There are set protocols regarding the wearing of medals official and un-official at the following website.

http://www.itsanhonour.gov.au/honours/awards/wearing.cfm

Unofficial medals

Ex-service organizations sometimes commission their own unofficial medals to mark participation in particular military campaigns, periods of service or types of service that have not been recognised through the Australian honours system. Awards made by foreign governments which have not been approved by the Governor-General for acceptance and wear are also "unofficial". There is no impediment to wearing such medals in appropriate private settings, such as a meeting of the relevant ex-service association, or a reception hosted by the relevant foreign government. Ideally, unofficial medals should not be worn at public ceremonial and commemorative events, but if they are worn as the occasion demands, the convention is that they are worn on the right breast.

Here are the two un-official medals that Fewson is wearing on the wrong side.

The RSL’s are aware of the protocol of wearing medals but fail to enforce them. It is an insult to the veterans who do the right thing and wear just their official medals and do not like to make them selves look like Christmas trees wearing useless trinkets. Many of the younger veterans are even more disgusted when they see the older veterans piling on trinkets that should be worn on the right breast below next of Kin medals if wearing them. How many medals to do want for one war? Does it make you feel like a big hero with the more trinkets you wear? Be satisfied with what you have been officially awarded.

Ronald Bruce Fewson you together with others from your area can grace our Medal Cheat site.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from the private citizens are supported by statement of fact and statutory declarations.

Surname: Lamming
Christian Names: Raymond Leslie
Country: Australia
State or Province: South Australia
City or Town: Unknown
Case Notes:

It’s official, Ray Lamming of South Australia is a “Tosser”. 

 

 

As a representative of Vietnam Veterans at a South Australian, Australian Rules football match on ANZAC Day 2012, Ray Lamming was called upon to “toss the coin”. Unfortunately, to do the job, he deigned to wear a self purchased “Tin Vietnam Medal”.

Lamming has five legitimate Defence Medals, but has chosen to claim six, having foolishly added a self purchased “Tin” medal to his rack. 

The offending medal was 'invented' for gullible Veterans who attended a Vietnam Veterans Parade in Launceston, Tasmania, and is affectionately known as "the Battle of Launceston Medal." It is an abomination, and serves only to boost egos by fooling the general public into thinking a person has more medals than they have earned. Here is the offending "Tin" trinket.

 

 

South Australia has always been the “Tin” capital of Australia, because a “Shonky” Medals Dealer named “Colonel” Barry Presgrave, who at one time held the position of President of the South Australia National Servicemen’s association, convinced his members to purchase “Tin” medals from him.

Raymond Lamming is a genuine Infantry Combat, Vietnam Veteran who was wounded in action at Grid Reference 435585 in Long Dien, on 8 February 1968 and we applaud his service, however despite his contribution in Vietnam, because he now chooses to wear the self purchased “Tin” medal in celebration of the "Battle of Launceston",  he is eligible to be featured on this web site.

Our promise – Wear “Tin” and we will feature you on our web site

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from private citizens are supported by statements of fact and statutory declarations.

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