Booth

Date of Entry: 11/02/2018
Surname: Booth
Christian Names: Ian/Iain Montgomery
Country: Phillipines
State or Province: Angeles City
City or Town: Angeles City
Service #: 02407
Service: Royal Australian Navy
Branch: Seaman
Commencement of service: 06 Mar 67
Completion of service: Jun 71
Case Notes:

 

Iain Booth was born on the 25 April, 1949. In 1967, he enlisted in the Royal Australian Navy as a Cadet Midshipman. In the following years he progressed to Sub Lieutenant. He is a Medals Cheat and a false pretender. Booth wears seven medals. He is entitled to wear four.

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In the above 2017 Remembrance Day photograph, taken at Angeles City, near Manilla, Phillipines, Booth is wearing the following medals.

1. The Australian Active Serve Medal - (AASM) Entitled.
2. Vietnam Medal. (VM) Not entitled
3. Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal. – (VLSM) Entitled.
4. Australian Service Medal. (ASM) Entitled
5. Australian Defence Medal. (ADM)Entitled.
6. U.S Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, with a "Combat V clasp. Not entitled.
7. Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. (RVCM) Not entitled.

Concerns were raised by individuals in Australia and the Phillippines, regarding Australian military medals worn by Booth. He also falsely claimed service on HMAS Hobart, a Royal Australian Navy Destroyer, in June, 1968. ANZMI are in possession of signed statements of fact in regards to lies told by Booth regarding Hobart service, at the time he claims. .

It appears that the medals he wears are not consistent with his actual RAN service. In particular, the VM and the VLSM cannot be worn together. You are issued with one or the other. He has been warned in writing several times by RSL Sub Branch Executives about not conforming with medals protocols and wearing medals he is not entitled to. Booth also made other comments to others about his alleged RAN service that are false.

ANZMI then researched the public records, regarding the Royal Australian Navy career of Ian Booth, as he was known then, and arrived at the same conclusion. He has since changed his first name to "Iain."

ANZMI then communicated with Mr Iain Booth and asked him for a summary of his Naval service and the medals that he wears. His response, inter alia, is below -;

I readily concede that there has been an error in my medal issue and that the VLSM cannot be issued with the Vietnam Medal, but the fact that my medals were all issued and named to me is not my error and I therefore feel that I am entitled to wear them. It would be less than prudent to knowingly wear medals that were supposedly not issued together (unless in error) as this would doubtlessly bring into question my entitlement.

Following that idiotic statement, we believe that Booth not only lives in another country, he lives on another planet.

We should all be glad that the Department of Defence did not send him a Victoria Cross in “error”. With Booth’s view on medals protocol, he would have had that medal court mounted and worn as well, claiming that he is entitled to wear it, as "it was not his error!"

The three medals that Booth and ANZMI know that he is not entitled to wear, are the Vietnam Medal (VM), the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. (RVCM) and the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, with clasp.

1. The Vietnam Medal.

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Qualification requirement
Australia

Qualifying service for the Vietnam Medal includes:
• 28 days in ships or craft on inland waters or off the coast of Vietnam.
• One or more days on the posted strength of a unit or formation on land.
• One operational sortie over Vietnam or Vietnamese water by aircrew on the posted strength of a unit.
• Official visits either continuous or aggregate of 30 days.
• One day or more by members of accredited philanthropic organisations attached to Australian forces in an official capacity for full-time duty. between 29 May 1964 and 27 January 1973.

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2. The Republic of Vietnam Medal.

Australia

The Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal was awarded to Australian military personnel for service in South Vietnam during the period 31 July 1962 to 28 March 1973. The requirements for the award are: at least 181 days service, either continuous or aggregated, unless killed on active service (KIA); or wounded in action (includes psychological injury)[9] and evacuated (medically evacuated other than being wounded does not meet requirement for medal); or captured and later released or escaped.

Booth blames the Department of Defence for “the error”. He knows that it is wrong, but he fraudulently had the medals court mounted, and wears them on official occasions illegally. If you believe his suspect story that the medals were sent to him "in error". why didn't he just return them.

ANZMI asked Booth if he did actually serve in Vietnam, what period he served, what ship or ships he was a crew member of, and what medals was he actually entitled to? He stated that he was unable to recall unless he looked through his records, that were in a garage somewhere in Australia. After two further requests, Booth did not give any specific details of his Vietnam service, other than to respond "that there are other ships I served on in the operational area."

The below Vietnam War Service Certificate issued, purportedly by the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), indicates that Booth served in Vietnam Waters for 413 days. It lists the following ships that Booth allegedly served on in Vietnam during the qualifying period 1962 to 1973.


1. HMAS Sydney
2. HMAS Parramatta.
3. HMAS Yarra
4. HMAS Hobart
5. CINPAC. (Commander in Chief Pacific)

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The certificate is false. It is a forgery. Only one person could benefit from this forged document. The person who submitted it to the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch.

This certificate was with other documentation submitted to the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch, by Booth, when Booth applied to transfer his membership from Hornsby RSL Sub Branch, Sydney, in November, 2016.  We know that the information that appears on this certificate is false. His name does not appear on any of the published lists of crew members, for the three, 6 month deployments to Vietnam by Hobart.

We have signed statements from members of the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch and Hornsby RSL Sub Branch, detailing that Booth claims that he was on Hobart when it was damaged by 3 missiles from a U.S.A.F aircraft.

This incident occurred on the 17 June, 1968. Two crew members were killed and others injured. Extensive damage was sustained by Hobart and we can all be thankful that there was no greater loss of life to our young men.

Booth, according to his official Navy Record, was posted on Parramatta at that time, and was nowhere near Vietnam as he has claimed. Parramatta was in Singapore Harbour undergoing lengthy repairs, when Booth deceitfully claims he was part of Hobart's crew.

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Strangely, the only current Vietnam War Service Certificate for Booth on the DVA Website appears below. There is no of ships that Booth served on or dates served.

Vietnam War Service

Veteran Details
Name BOOTH, Ian Montgomery
Service Royal Australian Navy
Service Number O2407
Rank Sub-Lieutenant
Honours None for display


Something is amiss.

ANZMI then received another communication from Booth, where he stated that he served on the following ships on operational service in Vietnam.-;

Might I suggest that you check my service in the following ships -

HMAS Sydney 1967, 1968
HMAS Parramatta 1968
HMAS Yarra 1969
USS Brinkley Bass 1970
HMAS Sydney 1970 -1971

He does not mention Hobart on this occasion. He also knows that he has been caught out in regards to serving 181 days on Hobart, when it was stationed on the Gun Line, to qualify for the VM and the VCM. He has now substituted Hobart with the USS Brinkley Bass, a United States Navy Destroyer, that served on and off in Vietnam waters for short periods in 1970. According to our research, Booth was never attached to that ship for any period of time. There are no records of him serving on that ship.

He also claims Vietnam service on HMAS Yarra 1969. Yarra did not have qualifying operational service in Vietnam in 1969. It escorted the Aircraft Carrier HMAS Sydney to Vung Tau, Vietnam in the last week of February, 1970. (Ships Record of Proceedings)

We know that Booth did not spend 413 days in the qualifying area of Vietnam, as indicated on his false certificate. He is not entitled to wear the Vietnam medal or the Vietnam Campaign Medal. (181 days or more) His Certificate of Vietnam Service, allegedly issued by the Department of Veterans Affairs is a lie, and Booth knows it.

His National Archives Australia Naval records, indicate that he was posted to the Sydney when it travelled to Vung Tau Harbour, Vietnam, on the 27 December, 1967. The ship arrived at 0700 hours that date and left at 1450hrs. A total of about 8 hours. However, qualifying time is accredited from the time the ship left the last Australian Port of Fremantle until its return to Australia 14 days later. His records disclose that he was also a crew member of Sydney when it sailed to Vietnam in late January, 1968 and spent 7 hours in Vung Tau Harbour on the 3 February, 1968.

Also Booths Naval Record indicates that he was on Parramatta between March and July, 1968. On 9 April, 1968. Parramatta visited Vung Tau Harbour for 9 hours escorting Sydney.

It appears then, that Booth deployed on Sydney in December 1967 and February. 1968, to Vung Tau Harbour and then on Parramatta in April, 1968. That being the case, he is entitled to wear the AASM, and the VLSM for those three trips and accumulated 24 hours in the port of Vung Tau..

He is not entitled to wear the Vietnam medal or the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal.

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The above medal that he wears between the ADM and the VCM is the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. Booth has added the "Combat V" clasp to the medal that he wears. The medal is awarded for -;

The (U.S) Navy and Marine Corps Commendation medal may be awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the Navy or Marine Corps (including foreign military personnel), distinguishes himself/herself by heroic or meritorious achievement or service. To merit this award, the acts or services must be accomplished or performed in a manner above that normally expected and sufficient to distinguish the individual above those performing similar services as set forth in the following -;

For Meritorious Achievement. Outstanding and worthy of special recognition,

For Meritorious Service. Outstanding and worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal or Air Medal when combat is involved or the Meritorious Service Medal or Air Medal when combat is not involved.

For Acts of Heroism. Worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal when combat is involved or the Navy and Marine Corps Medal when combat is not involved.

For Acts of Heroism

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