Entries with Surname (Title)s starting with 'W'

Surname: Williams C
Christian Names: Chase Owen aka Nick
Country: New Zealand
State or Province: South Island
City or Town: Christchurch
NZ -Which Island:
  • South Island
Service #: Nil
Service: Nil
Branch: Nil
Commencement of service: None
Completion of service: None
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Chase Owen Williams is allocated to the most disgraceful form of wannabe . He is a cowardly "Love Rat" who charms, then victimises vulnerable young ladies. He leads them to believe he is  Warrant Officer in the New Zealand (NZ) Army.  In essence he is an impostor  and a liar who has never served in the NZ Defence Force.

Williams runs a Facebook page where he fails to show a photograph of himself. but it is filled with Soldiers in very active training shots, all have the common denominator of having their faces covered.

In this photograph from his Facebook he refers to "Our" military trucks.

Williams has related the following military history:

"Isa current serving Warrant officer in the NZ Army based at Burnham Camp, Christchurch.  He  grew up in Rarotonga and moved to the United States at a young age and joined the US Marines aged Fifteen years, then moved to NZ and Joined the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) and in the last Four years transferred to the NZ Army."

All of the above are the words of a pathological liar, wannabe and cheat. 

We suggest that New Zealanders' keep a watch for this disgusting person and whenever he is recognised he should be reported to the Police.

This "Love Rat" well deserves his position on our web site.

 

Surname: Willoughby
Christian Names: Dale Anthony
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Sanctuary Point
Service: Army
Case Notes:

Dale Anthony Willoughby of Sanctuary Point, New South Wales is a liar, medal cheat and wannabe.

Willoughby-1

From the above photo you can see that Willoughby is wearing a number of medals which are from left
to right:

Australian Active Service Medal 1975 with clasps East Timor and Afghanistan (only entitled to Clasp
East Timor)

International Force East Timor Medal (Interfet) (entitled)

Afghanistan Medal (not entitled)

Defence Long Service Medal (not entitled did not serve the required time)

Australian Defence Medal (entitled)

Above the medals he is wearing a blue Unit Citation which is the United States Presidential Unit
Citation awarded to 3 Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (3RAR) for the battle of Kapyong in the
Korean War. The citation was formerly known as the “Distinguished Unit Citation” till it was renamed
in November 1966.

He is not entitled to wear that Unit Citation on civilian dress as he was never in that battle, only ex-serving members who were involved in that battle can wear it on civilian dress. Serving members of 3RAR wear the Unit Citation as part of their dress uniforms only whilst members of that battalion.

Willoughby-2

Infantry Combat Badge (not entitled as he did not meet the requirements for that Badge)
 
Here are some of the Claims Dale Willoughby has made:

1. As part of his post traumatic stress claim,  he has stated while serving in East Timor he saw a girl being raped. He had the offender in his sights but could not open fire due to the rules of
engagement.
 
If this was true, what stopped him and the rest of his section from pulling the offender off the girl
and arresting him to hand over to the proper authorities to be dealt with.

2. He said he was in Iraq attached to the US 101st Airborne Division as a forward scout which is the reason he was not awarded the Iraq medal.

We can only assume the mighty US 101st Airborne Division was short of Forward Scouts and that
is why a lone Australian Private was attached to them.

3. He said he was attached to an Australian Special Air Service Troop in Afghanistan as a
Forward Scout where he saw a mate shot while standing next to him.

Again we can only assume again they did not have sufficient forward scouts.

4. He said he was in a helicopter crash whilst in Afghanistan and again claims he was next to a mate that was killed in the crash and when the helicopter blew up he was wounded and still
has shrapnel in him that cannot be removed.

willoughby-3

One member in the group photo was in the Navy when a helicopter crashed on Bass Strait oil rigs
back in the 1980’s, so we can leave it to you imagination where he made that story up from.

We know that he has made other false claims about his service to other people. Should you
be one of these persons and wish to let us know about these claims, you can contact us through
our web site and we can update his case.

Dale Willoughby was contacted by us and denied making any such claims. When asked about the medals, his reply was;

“I had a friend who was sick in hospital and he asked me to wear his medals on ANZAC Day.”

He shot himself in the foot with that excuse as the photo was not taken on ANZAC Day
2012 but later in the year at another service.

We have managed to collect some information about his service through various informants to
know he only served approximately 11 years in the army and a lot of that was in non-infantry units. We
also know that he only did operational service in East Timor and that was for a short period.

Dale Anthony Willoughby,  for your fairy tale war stories, wearing of awards you are not entitled to, 
you obviously lack honesty, integrity and most of all,  respect for the ex-servicemen and
women that have served in these operations.

You have earned the right to join others like you on our web site.

This is published in the public interest, veterans of all conflicts, in particular that of the
Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports
from the private citizens are supported by statement of fact and statutory declarations.

Persons appearing on our site that are now deceased will not be removed, but the case will
have the word "Deceased" placed next to their name when we are advised.

Surname: Wimberley
Christian Names: Terry
Country: Australia
State or Province: Queensland
City or Town: Nerang
Service #: Not Known
Service: USA Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Vietnam Era
Completion of service: Not Known
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Terry Wimberley was born in Kentucky USA in 1946.  He is an ex United States (US) Army Veteran of the Vietnam era.  He now resides in Nerang, Queensland, Australia. 

 

Note that Wimberley is wearing among other medals and awards:

A United States Silver Star Medal, and a Bronze Star Medal.

 

 

He has developed a small profile in Australia as:

Secretary to Australian Bat Clinic:   Company Profile : Australian Bat Clinic & Wildlife Trauma Centre

Ritual Elder to Mankind Project Australia:  ManKind Project Australia - | ManKind Project Australia

According to Wikipedia, as a Ritual Elder of the Mankind Project he is required to "Support men in meaningful lives of integrity, accountability, responsibility and emotional intelligence".  When you read further you will see, that by his actions, he follows none of the Mankind Project principals

His claim to fame is that he was awarded  the very prestigious United States (US) Silver Star War Medal which is the third highest US military decoration, awarded to members of the US Armed Forces for "Gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States".  He also wears a US Bronze Star which is awarded for "Heroic or meritorious service or achievement"

There is no doubt that he served in Vietnam as a member of the US, 25th Infantry Regiment, 2/27th Infantry Battalion known as the "Wolfhounds".

Nowhere on Military Records, or lists in the United States, is Wimberley listed as having been awarded a Silver Star. We asked him about this, and  he supplied the following explanation and  photograph.

"Dear Mr. xxxxxxxxx

Further to your enquiry I have found the attached photo taken some time in

1968. The photo shows me receiving the award or awards from the Battalion

Commander, that you were interested in.

Interesting for me is that many of my fellow Wolfhounds and I cared less

about the awards---We just wanted to go home. Amazing for me that I found

this picture as I could only find about 40 photos in all. I have a vague

memory of a man in my platoon named Jake and I believe he took the photo.

Thank you for your interest and if you served----Thank you for your service."

The photograph provides no evidence of him being awarded a Silver Star. We are reliably advised that because it is a small unit parade, he is most likely being awarded the USA Infantry Combat Badge

We contacted sources in the United States and received the following responses:

From his US Army UnitAssociation

"Wolfhound Historical Society

Hello Sir, in respond (sic)  to you; yes, there was a Terry Wimberley in 2/27th Wolfhounds of the 25th ID. He also served Vietnam the year 1967-1968. I could not find record  of Silver Star award.

Wolfhounds forever,

Dorsey Weeks,President"

 

On 2 May 1971 an article about Wimberley appeared in the newspaper, Progress Bulletin from Pomona California. 

Unfortunately the clipping is unreadable, however we had it read in the USA and in relation to his military service it says:

"Terry Wimberley was drafted into the Army in 1967 and spent a year in South Vietnam where he was a forward observer and was wounded twice."

Had he been awarded a Silver and a Bronze Star during his service, he would have been a minor celebrity and it would certainly have been mentioned in a public relations "blurb".

Here is another report from a reliable source:

"[i]Good Day Mr. xxxxxxxxx,

I am glad to assist, in any way I can, concerning Mr. Terry Wimberley. The fotos (sic) of Mr. Terry Wimberley are an excellent starting point.

As you mentioned already, I was unable to find a citation for a "US Silver Star" (Silver Star Medal) for a "Terry Wimberley". Nowhere did I find a reference to Mr. Terry Wimberley for a valor award.

If said individual was an "Infantryman" he would also be entitled to a Combat Infantryman Badge ( or CIB). Strange that if this is the same "Terry Wimberley that the article would not mention he is a decorated veteran (i.e. Silver Star/Bronze Star recipient).

The photo apears (sic)  legitimate. The photo does depict a medal(s) or award(s) ceremony taking place, probably in Vietnam. The uniforms and surroundings look legitimate. The olive drab uniforms with concealed botton  (sic) down flap pockets are consistent with 1968 Vietnam. The ceremony is small (apparantly) (sic) two rows and involves what appears to be only "Specialists" enlisted Soldiers. The individual presenting the medal(s) or award(s) is certainly an officer and in the 25th Infantry Division.

Taking all of the above into account, it is my personal opinion, this is provably (sic) a ceremony to present the Combat Infantry Badge (CIB) to qualifying Infantrymen of the 25th Infantry Division serving in Vietnam.  I cannot infer anything else from this photo alone..

Mr. Terry Wimberley may be a legitimate "draftee" and "veteran" of the Vietnam War, but there is no information to substantiate his Silver Star or Bronze Star medals."

After gathering the above information we again contacted Wimberley and requested some definitive proof of his claimed valour awards, however he failed to respond.

Wimberley is a long way from Kentucky and we can assume that he thought that he could dupe Australian Veterans by adding a bit of extra colour to his Medal Rack in the form of prestigious USA Valour awards.

Wimberley is now a discredited fraud liar and wannabe.  He obviously swaggers around his "Mankind Project" Cult as a heroic Ritual Elder, when in fact he was, like most of us, an ordinary soldier who did their job without the need for false fame.

We suggest to Wimberley to not wear his false medals, and to not mix in the Australian Veteran Community, as genuine veterans loathe liars and frauds.

We have a very strong following in the USA and am sure thousands of US ex servicemen will also be disgusted by Wimberley's behaviour.

Wimberley sought false fame by wearing fake medals, however he has now found fame on this web site where he will stay for ever more.

Surname: Witchard
Christian Names: Ken
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Bega
Service #: Not Known
Service: Navy
Branch: Quartermaster General
Commencement of service: 1971
Completion of service: 1977
Case Notes:

 

 

 

A few weeks ago, ANZMI exposed a group of medal miscreants from the Bega RSL Sub Branch.   You can find this report by following the link:

BEGA RSL SUB BRANCH

The actions of one of the members of this infamous group has attracted significant attention, particularly in New Zealand.    You see, the story goes like this.   WITCHARD served in the Royal Australian Navy and one of his postings was to HMAS Supply.   During this posting, Supply, accompanied initially by Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) frigate HMNZS Otago and later by RNZN frigate HMNZS Canterbury, sailed to Moruroa Atoll in official protest of the French Canopus atmospheric nuclear test.

Here lies the story of the tin medal being worn by WITCHARD.  

This next image, from our original exposure shows Ken, that’s him in the centre, wearing his tin medals and at the time we could not identify the orange ribbon and medal at the end of his rack.

We have since learnt that the Tin Medal is the ‘Australian Nuclear Veterans Association Medal’.   A medal purchased from the Veterans Association and not issued by the Australian Government.

It is not ANZMI’s place to comment on the appropriateness of medallic recognition for the crew of HMAS Supply for this service.   Suffice to say that the New Zealand Government chose to issue her sailors with the New Zealand Special Service Medal (Nuclear Testing).    The official NZ Medal looks like this: 

Ken WITCHARD has conducted a crusade over the years to have the crew of HMAS Supply recognised.   The Australian Government has taken the view that the service of HMAS Supply during this period was no more or less that other service rendered by the ship in peacetime.   You may agree or disagree with this decision, but until the Government changes its mind that is that.

 WITCHARD has been very active in his efforts to circumvent the Australian Government and has attempted to gain support in New Zealand for HMAS Supply to be recognised by the New Zealand Government.

During his many communications with NZ Veteran organisations, WITCHARD let the ball slip regarding the medals he had been photographed wearing.

In response to a direct question about the medal with the orange ribbon, WITCHARD replied;

Ok on the medals we found out that one of the ones I was wearing was wrong and apparently not entitled to it so I’ve removed it the orange/red one is the Australian Nuclear Veterans medal released by that group some years ago” 

WRONG, he has been photographed numerous times and that medal appears on his rack each time.   He did not remove it until ANZMI drew attention to it.

Our concerned New Zealander then asked him about the second, or middle medal as our Kiwi friend confused it with the New Zealand Defence Force Medal (NZDFM).   When viewed together, you can see why there would be confusion.   The NZDFM (first), and the TIN Australian Regular Forces Medal.

 

In attempting to deflect questions about this medal, WITCHARD replies with the classic wannabe response;

“No, I think from the information we just received that the Government didn’t issue it, contrary to what we were told.   Mine was sent from Canberra and I assumed it came from the Defence Honours and Awards department as it was in a plain satchel with no government markings”.

What a load of rubbish.   WITCHARD actually expects us to believe that a mysterious parcel arrived in the mail, with no covering letter or markings of any sort and when he opened the parcel, shock, horror a medal fell out.   Of course if it did happen, you would not question what the hell it was about, but simply add it to your rack, wouldn’t you?   We at ANZMI think not.   Mysterious medals don’t just turn up in the mail.  

The only plausible reason there was no paperwork is that WITCHARD must have disposed of the receipt and credit card transaction before showing off his new gong!

Many ex-service personnel probably feel that there were parts of their service that should be worthy of medallic recognition, but unlike those countries that award medals for turning up to work, Australia is not that shallow.

WITCHARD is symbolic of those wannabes who want to create something special and daring out of what was a normal peacetime operation for HMAS Supply.   Yes, there were inherent dangers but most ADF operations, exercises and peacetime deployments have some sort of danger associated with their execution.

Welcome to your own place on our website, Ken WITCHARD.

Surname: Woodford
Christian Names: Graeme John
Country: Australia
State or Province: Western Australia
City or Town: Perth
Service #: R54733
Service: RAN
Branch: Gunnery
Commencement of service: 23/8/1958
Completion of service: 28/6/1961
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Graeme John Woodford was born in 1940. He is the President of the Perth North Sub Section, Western Australia Naval Association.

He is a medals cheat.

Woodford claims 5 medals for his operational service in Malaya and Singapore waters in deployments between late 1959 and early 1960. He also claims a further tin UK medal for a brief time on an Australian Merchant ship when he was 15 years of age.

Woodford wears tin purchased medals amongst his genuine awarded medals on his left chest.


In the above photograph, Woodford is claiming the following medals -;

1. The Australian Active Service Medal 1945-1975. Clasp Malaya.
2. The Naval General Service Medal. 1915-1962. Clasp Malaya. Probably entitled.
3. Australian Service Medal. 1945-1975. clasp FESR (Far East Strategic Reserve) Entitled.
4. The Pingat Jasa Malaysia/Singapore medal. Entitled.
5. Far East Strategic Reserve Medal. Unofficial tin medal. Purchased.
6. UK Merchant Navy Service Medal. Unofficial tin medal purchased.

Woodford enlisted in the RAN in 1958 for a term of nine years. After a short period he was posted to the HMAS Quickmatch, an anti submarine Frigate.

The Quickmatch did five operational service deployments to Malaya and Singapore waters between 24 September, 1958 and the 6 March, 1960. Woodford served on the ship for 3 of these deployments accumulating 90 days operational service. Enough for his Pingat medal.

In "The West Australian" newspaper article, titled "Sea in blood of Quickmatch Gunner", Woodford is photographed with his six medals. He relates to the reporter that he was only a lad of 17 when he was sent off to Singapore not knowing what to expect. He was in fact 19. In the article he relates his war events as "being edgy" because he had to travel into Singapore (on leave) on a bus that was "reinforced". He also relates how his ship had to tow a (friendly) junk in the middle of the night due to its engine problems. He recalls that his ship had to negotiate the closed Sunda Strait followed by two Indonesian gun boats, but "nothing happened".

Excerpts from the Newspaper story are cited below.

"Of course, at the time I didn't realise that anything was going on in the world," Mr Woodford said. "We had done exercises around Australia, and before we knew it we were off to Singapore. You know, we were 17-year-old kids. We thought, 'Singapore, great!'

On one occasion Quickmatch, after conducting exercises and while heading back to Singapore, came upon what appeared to be a suspicious situation. A Chinese junk attracted the warship's attention. An armed boarding party was sent over. It could have been a ploy of some kind. But it turned out the junk's engine was disabled. So the boat was taken in tow.

Later that night, AB Woodford witnessed human drama on the high seas. "I was down on the quarter-deck. On the way back to Singapore we struck a tropical storm. I could hear this (calling) in the background. If it hadn't been for a flash of lightning I wouldn't have seen it. The tow was going under. But we managed to pick them all up," he recounted.

Before Mr Woodford's career with the RAN ended he would spend two years in the exotic waters of South East Asia, usually in six or nine-month rotating deployments.

For all this he wears five medals in addition to his tin Merchant Navy medal.
His claim that before his career with the RAN ended, he would spend two years in the exotic waters of South East Asia, usually in six or nine month rotating deployments is untrue. His service record below does not support this statement. It also indicates that he completed almost 3 years out of the original 9 and was discharged on compassionate grounds.

The AASM was issued to Woodford for his Malaya service as well as the Naval General Service Medal 1915 - 1962. It appears that the ASM with clasp FESR was also issued for service in the same area.

Not satisfied with this and to enhance his status, Woodford has also purchased the unofficial tin FESR medal for the same 90 day period to increase his rack as well as the tin meaningless UK Merchant Navy Medal. (below) This medal can be purchased on line from a Medal Dealer in the UK for forty two pounds.

Here at Anzmi, we sometimes just don't get it.

Here we have a genuine former RAN Able Seaman who is entitled to awards that he should be satisfied with. Embellishing them with tin meaningless purchased adornments to improve his rack is hard to understand and can only be ego driven.

In addition to being the President of the Perth North Sub Section, W.A. Naval Association, he is also the Vice President of the W.A. Branch of the National Malaya and Borneo Veterans Association. He is also the Senior Warden at the Sterling Memorial, Perth. Woodford should be leading by example and cease being a medals imposter. By your disrespect, you are encouraging your members to do the same, as already indicated in some photographs posted on your Perth North Sub Section Naval Association website.

If you have a need to wear purchased commemorative medals, then they should be worn on the right chest and not mixed or added to genuinely awarded military medals displayed on the left side.

Surname: Woolfe
Christian Names: Frank
Country: Australia
State or Province: South Australia
City or Town: Port Augusta
Service #: Not Known
Service: Army
Branch: RAE
Commencement of service: 1980
Completion of service: 1988
Case Notes:

 

 

Frank Woolfe served for 8 years in the Australian Army in the Royal Australian Engineers. (RAE). At the completion of his service, he was awarded the Australian Defence Medal for his 8 years service. (ADM)

He is currently a senior member of the State Emergency Service, South Australia (SES) at Port Augusta.

Woolfe’s Face Book page has numerous photographs of himself in SES and Coast Guard uniforms wearing medals and ribbons. He likes to be photographed in uniform.

 

Woolfe


In the above photograph, Woolfe wears on the left side the -;

1. Australian Defence Medal. Entitled.
2. The United Nations International Year of the Volunteer Medal. Tin commemorative.

In what appears to be an escalating problem for the State Emergency Service in South Australia, Woolfe has acquired the United Nations International Year of the Volunteer Medal and added it to his ADM., on the left side.

He has also acquired the unofficial ribbon that accompanied this medal and attached that to his one genuine ribbon. (below)

 

Woolfe2




The United Nations International Year of the Volunteer Medal is an unofficial tin commemorative medal. It can be purchased on line for 58 Australian dollars on eBay or from a Medal Dealer. Woolfe has spent an additional 60 Australian Dollars to have the tin medal court mounted with his DFM., to add that extra bit of glamour to his uniform.

The medal is not recognised by the Australian Government at It’s an Honour for Australian awards.

If worn, it should be placed on the right side with other commemorative medals and not added to or mixed with genuinely awarded National medals worn on the left.

 
Woolfe3



The South Australia State Emergency Service Dress Code states the following -;

EMBELLISHMENT AND INSIGNIA.
DECORATIONS AND MEDALS.


Decorations and Medals and medal ribbons may be worn on Service Dress, shirts or dress uniform on the left breast immediately above any fitted pocket. Medal and award ribbons are worn with service dress, with the wearing of actual medals reserved for official or ceremonial occasions. Medals/awards not recognised by the Australian Award Medal Schedule will be worn on the right side above pocket.[/b]

Woolfe is a senior member of the State Emergency Service, South Australia. He is blatantly disregarding his own Service Medals Wearing Protocols, to make his medal array more attractive. He sets a bad example for the younger members of the SES.

He has been contacted regarding his inappropriate wearing of the medal. His reply was that if it is good enough for the Chief Officer of the SASES (South Australia State Emergency Service) to wear it on the left side, then it is good enough for me. We have that comment in writing.

Woolfe is a disrespectful wannabe and a medal cheat. He disrespects Honours and Awards in wearing a tin trinket. He also disrespects all those current and former military service personnel, who have earned the right to wear National awarded medals on the left side the hard way.

Our message is simple to South Australia State Emergency Service personnel. If you wear unofficial tin medals on your left side, there is a very good chance you will see your photograph in uniform with tin medals on this website.

As an aside, and in response to Woolfe’s claim that the Chief Officer, SASES wears the identical tin trinket on the left side, we have viewed numerous photographs and videos of Chris Beattie, Chief Officer, SASES. In each photograph, he does not wear this medal or ribbon.

Woolfe is a self confessed medal cheat. He also distorts the truth when it suits him.

It is obvious that Mr Chris Beattie needs to have a serious chat with him.

Credibility - Make up your own mind!!

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