Entries with Surname (Title)s starting with 'M'

Surname: Marr
Christian Names: David
Country: Australia
State or Province: Victoria
City or Town: Melbourne
Case Notes:

This exposure of one David Marr, who resides in the suburbs of Melbourne, Australia, has been a harrowing one for many veterans who worked on this case;  especially so for the spouse of one genuine veteran in particular. Marr's military experience is not extensive. Some would say virtually non-existent. His entire military career spanned a short stint as a part-time soldier in a reservist unit totalling just four months service; just enough time to learn how to wear his uniform; some ten days of accrued time on duty.

His civilian employment was again part time. As a part-time travel consultant he was able to promote and chaperone (at no cost to himself it appears) a visit to The Wall in Washington DC, USA (America's national monument to the Vietnam War) in 1995 for a group of Australian Vietnam veterans. These veterans did not know that Marr was an imposter, far from it! They had no idea the military persona he presented was totally fraudulent. The image Marr presented was promoted and supported to the extent where he was totally accepted and involved with Army unit associations during the 1970's; hot on the heels of Australia's closure to the war, when many veterans felt betrayed by their country and the vast majority of returned service personnel kept a low profile. Circumstances which benefited Marr's fraudulent behaviour perfectly. These were nonetheless, simpler times; a was a time when society trusted another's word and wannabes were unheard of. David Marr was a very good con-man, duping many veterans. Especially after he was elected to committees representing the interests of Vietnam veterans. This expanded so much, and Marr's fraud contrived so well, that at the time nobody ever doubted the military background and experiences he presented.

Over the years Marr became more expert at his deception, exhibiting a very confident air and expanded his fantasies and experiences to such a height that duped everyone he met. He was able to convince some battle-hardened veterans that he was with the armoured column that came to their rescue at Long Tan, on the 18th of August 1966. His ultimate con trick was the visit of Vietnam veterans to The Wall in the United States in November of 1995. In his role as a part-time 'travel consultant' he arranged the entire trip, allegedly inflating the individuals' cost to minimise his own as he went along as the tour leader (an accepted practice in travel agencies is that a tour leader travels at no charge, provided a minimum quota of travellers is reached). Marr had been in the USA the previous year and presented his fake military credentials (a Lieutenant Colonel in Australia's Armoured Corps no less) thereby creating a bond, albeit it fraudulent, with the unsuspecting US Veteran establishment. The visit to Washington on Memorial Day, 11 November, was videotaped; look carefully at this video of Marr in the green shirt and plumed hat, remembering that he is a fraud.

This is but one small chapter in David Marr's life as a "wannabe." He has conned and stolen the innocence of many veterans, inflicting trauma and distrust to such an extent that one needed long-term counselling to prevent suicide, although it was attempted unsuccessfully. Marr's actions are despicable and unacceptable in any community, yet there is little the law enforcers are motivated to do. It is not of great public importance (as opposed to in the public interest) because his actions inflicted distress on 'only' a few dozen veterans and their families and not considered criminal

Despite the intent and promulgation of the penalties under the Defence Act 1903 as amended, remedies under the Act are seldom used; perhaps because the penalties are so incredulously light (see left).

Marr in the photo on this page is seen wearing two medals to which he is not entitled, the Australian Vietnam Medal and the Vietnam Campaign Star. In the video here (warning; long download) he is also wearing the Defence Force Service Medal. A medal awarded for 15 years service in the Australian military; not 15 weeks!

So what are the answers to the problems presented by the Marrs of our society? Veterans fought and died for the principles of freedom and equality, never expecting or deserving the distressing experience of meeting and suffering the antics of the David Marrs of this world. The best other veterans can do is to continue to expose these unwanted afflictions of today's society. 

By exposing Marr and others on these pages it brings solace to the victims and helps to make others aware that frauds are in many places in our society, sometimes in high places, and we must remain ever vigilant.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from private citizens are supported by statements of fact and statutory declarations.

 

Surname: Martin
Christian Names: Lyle Trevor
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Coraki
Service #: NX505172 & 21326746
Service: Army & Reserve
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: 1946 ARA. 1948 ARES
Completion of service: 1948 ARA. 1950 ARES.
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Purchasing fake or commemorative medals from Medal Dealers and tacking them on to the end of a genuine set of medals is usually the modus operandi of wannabees who have had no operational service whatsoever during their time in the military.

Alternatively,  our pages are full of other frauds who have never served in the military and just buy and wear whatever medals they like.

Our story below though makes us wonder why genuine veterans would want to cheapen their authorised rack by mounting non authorised medals beside their official awards.

Lyle Trevor Martin was born in August, 1928.  He is a Korean War veteran who served in the Australian Army and Reserves for 15 years.  He had a distinguished career with service in Japan, Korea and Malaysia.

In the above photographs Lyle Martin is wearing the following medals -;

1.         Australian Active Service Medal (AASM) Clasps Korea and Malaya.

2.         Korea Medal.

3.         Korea United Nations Medal.

4.         General Service Medal (GSM) 1918 – 1962. Clasp Malaya.

5.         Australian Service Medal (ASM) Clasp (possible PNG)

6.         Australian Defence Medal.

7.         Pinjat Jasa Malaysian Medal.

8.         Occupational Medal Japan. (Unawarded tin purchased medal.)

9.         Nuclear Test Medal. (Unawarded tin purchased medal.)

10.       Anniversary of Korea Medal. (Unawarded tin purchased medal.)

The last three medals on Martin’s rack are tin medals that he has purchased and had court mounted.   Martin has no need to embellish his rack. 

In the first and third photographs, Martin is wearing a Commando badge on his right lapel.  He was never a Commando and this badge should not be worn. 

Above his medal rack he also wears the United States Presidential Distinguished Unit Citation awarded to 3rd Battalion Royal Australian Regiment (3 RAR) for the Battle of Kapyong on the 24th and the 25th April, 1951.   Martin arrived in Korea on the 26 August, 1951 and did not serve in the Kapyong engagement.

The Kapyong Presidential Unit Citation may be worn by members whilst attached to that Unit.  Only those who were at Kapyong are eligible to wear it after leaving that Unit.   Martin arrived in Korea well after the battle of Kapyong.

Martin enlisted in the Australian Army on the 9 December, 1946.  He served for two years regular Army and during this period, he was posted to Japan for a time with the British Commonwealth Occupational Forces. 

He then discharged on the 25 October, 1948  and within a few days enlisted in the Royal Australian Army Reserves.  He then re-enlisted in the Australian Regular Army in July, 1950.

In August, 1951 Martin was posted to Korea as an Infantry soldier with 3 Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment. 

He was subsequently wounded in Korea on the 7 July, 1952, and was casualty evacuated to Japan and then to Sydney in September, 1952. 

He later served in Singapore in 1957 as a Storeman/Clerk and received the GSM with clasp Malaya.

He was discharged from the Australian Army on the 21 April, 1961.

We do not get satisfaction from exposing former military personnel who have served in areas of conflict.   However,  intentionally wearing three tin purchased medals with genuinely awarded medals is against all military medal protocols set down by the office of the Governor General. 

These protocols were initiated to maintain dignity, integrity and respect to all personnel awarded genuine military medals that are worn on the left side.  This is in keeping with long standing traditions.

Martin’s unofficial purchased tin medals should be worn on the right side with his other commemorative medals and below ancestors or family members medals that are worn on specific occasions.

The NSW Korean War Veterans Association (KVAA)  is awash with members wearing self purchased tin medals.  Their Face Book page displays members from the NSW President , Allen Lewis down to ordinary members,  wearing un-awarded medals on the left side at official commemorative functions.  The National Executive of the KVAA need to address the correct medal wearing procedures by their members to ensure that they conform with existing rules and protocols.

Martin is a former President of the Coraki, New South Wales Returned and Services League (RSL)  Sub Branch.  He has also been a member of the Woodburn – Evans Head RSL and the Casino RSL.

He has been cautioned on numerous occasions by RSL Sub Branch officials and members regarding the wearing of non awarded medals on the left side.  On each occasion he has ignored that advice.

He should know better.

Surname: Martin L.
Christian Names: Lewis
Country: Australia
State or Province: Victoria
City or Town: Endeavour Hills
Service #: 3171677
Service: Army - CMF
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: 30 May 1961
Completion of service: 11 Dec 1964
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Lewis Martin has broken the code and betrayed all ex servicemen who have gone before him.  He has deliberately and for his own vanity worn a rack of false medals including  the prestigious Imperial Military Medal (MM) which is awarded for "Bravery in the Field".

MartinLew 1

 

Martin is wearing the following medals.

Military Medal

Australian Active Service Medal

General Service Medal 1962 (Borneo)

Vietnam Medal

Queens Silver Jubilee Medal

National Medal

Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

He has no entitlement to any of them.

During 2015 Martin tried to launch himself into the Veteran fraternity with a request to join a Royal Australian Army Medical Corps (RAAMC) Facebook group.

Borneo and Vietnam may have been more than 45 years ago but for those involved, it is  as if it were yesterday, and if you were in the RAAMC and had been awarded an MM you would be well known.

After lots of head scratching  and checking, the RAAMC Facebook people correctly suspected that Martin could be a fraud and a wannabe and passed a request to us for investigation.

We discovered that Martin served in the Australian Citizens Military Forces (CMF) as a Private Soldier from 30 May 1961 to 11 Dec 1964.  His unit was 2nd Battalion Royal Victorian Regiment (2RVR) and he spent all of his time in Victoria, Australia.

Here is his Record of Service Card.

 MartinLew 2

 

We contacted Martin as follows:

"Our organisation is involved with research for Australian and New Zealand Defence Force Veterans.

It has been brought to our notice that you wear seven Defence Medals indicating being awarded the prestigious Military Medal (MM) for bravery, as well as (among others) Campaign medals for Borneo and Vietnam.

As we are unable to locate any reference to your military service involving overseas deployments we thought it best to ask you direct.  We have no notions one way or the other and would be very happy to receive your advice regarding this matter.

We will require an answer by email to the above address by the 20 December 2015.

 

Should you choose not to respond we will proceed without your input."

At least Martin showed good sense in confessing to his deception. We received the following email from him:

MartinLew 3

 

Martin gave no reason for his fraud and deception.  We do know that at his place of employment at the time the photograph was taken,  he was thought to be a Returned Soldier.

Stealing the honour of genuine veterans is a loathsome act.

 In this age of communication technology together with the awareness of genuine veterans and the abilities of ANZMI, all who "try it on" will be detected and exposed on this website.

Once installed you will stay here well beyond your use by date. 

Surname: Mason
Christian Names: Herbert Alec
Country: Australia
State or Province: Victoria
City or Town: Epping
Service #: 327842
Service: Australian Army
Branch: RAEME
Commencement of service: 1965
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

Herbert Alec Mason was born on the 28 August, 1945. He is the current President of the Epping (Victoria) Returned and Services League (R&SL) Sub Branch, a suburb of Melbourne, Australia.

MASON1 2017 06 04 1


About 1965, Mason enlisted in the Australian Regular Army. Following Recruit Training he was posted to the Corps of RAEME .

On the 29 December, 1967, Mason was deployed to the Republic of South Vietnam as a member of the 1st Independent Armoured Squadron Workshop. He was later attached to the 1st Armoured Squadron Workshop.

In March, 1968, whilst on Base at this last posting, MASON received an accidental bullet wound to his foot. He was then hospitalised for 17 days in country, and returned to Australia as a Non Battle Casualty. (NBCAS) after 102 days in South Vietnam.

In the above photograph, Mason is wearing the following medals -;

1. Australian Active Service Medal 1945 -1975. (Entitled)
2. Vietnam Medal. (Entitled)
3. Centenary Medal. (Entitled)
4. Australian Defence Medal. (Entitled)
5. Vietnam Campaign Medal. (181 days service in South Vietnam. Not entitled)

The Vietnam Campaign Medal is awarded for 181 days service in the former Republic of South Vietnam. There are exceptions and these are listed below -;

Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

MasonVietnam Campaign Medal with 1960 clasp 2017 06 04



The Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal was issued by the Government of the Republic of Vietnam for service in the prescribed area of operations in Vietnam during the period commencing on 31 July 1962 and ending on 28 March 1973 for Australian personnel.

The Australian government maintained the basic qualifying criteria specified by the Republic of Vietnam for allied troops. To be eligible for the medal a person must have completed a minimum period of 181 days, either continuous or aggregated, unless:

killed on active service (KIA);
wounded in action i.e. classified as a Battle Casualty and evacuated as a result of those wounds; or
captured and later released or escaped.
Medical evacuation from the area of operations for any reasons other than wounds received in action does not constitute an exemption from meeting the minimum qualifying period.
Design
The medal is a gold and white enamelled star with a green, red and gold centre motif.
Ribbon
The ribbon is green with three white stripes.
A ribbon device bearing the inscription ‘1960–’ is worn on the medal ribbon. A smaller device with the inscription ‘60- ’ is worn on the ribbon bar.

Mason was not “wounded in action and he was not classified as a Battle Casualty and evacuated as a result of those wounds”.

Concerned members of Epping and nearby R&SL Sub Branches expressed their concerns to ANZMI that Mason is a medal cheat.

We contacted Mason in regards to wearing the medal. . He stated that he was entitled to wear it. He informed us that in 1968, he was a patient in Heidelberg Hospital in Melbourne, Victoria , following his return from South Vietnam and was receiving treatment for the wound to his foot, when he received the Vietnam Medal and The Vietnam Campaign Medal in the mail. ANZMI then informed him that he did not meet the criteria and that he must have purchased it. He denied that.

A few hours later, Mason sent an email to ANZMI stating that, “he had lied about the particular medal and that he has no entitlement to wear it, and I have. I apologise for lying to you.”

Herbert Mason is a President of a Victorian R&SL Sub Branch. He has held that position for some time. He sets a bad example for all the Epping R&SL members and the Victorian R&SL State Branch. In particular, the younger Timor, Iraq and Afghanistan veterans that the R&SL is attempting to attract to the organisation.


During the past few years, ANZMI have exposed numerous Victorian R&SL Sub Branch Presidents and other Executives for being Medal Cheats, Valour thieves or just outright imposters. They all appear on this website -;

Lance Mailer Smith – President. Glenroy R&SL. Victoria.
John Malcolm Griffiths. President. Essendon R&SL. Victoria.
Geoffrey Phillip Lyles. President. Kyneton R&SL. Victoria.
Douglas Craig O’Loughlan. President Bright R&SL. Victoria.
David Hugh Edwards. President. Leongatha R&SL. Victoria.
Now, Herbert Alec Mason, President Epping R&SL Victoria, can be added to the growing list.

It is the responsibility of State Branch R&SL Victoria, to audit their executives and members more fervently. It is not that hard. Someone is asleep at the wheel.

Mason should apologise to the membership at the Epping R&SL Sub Branch, Victoria, for being a medal cheat, and then resign the Presidency immediately.

Surname: Massingham
Christian Names: David
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Rydalmeer
Case Notes:

David Massingham of Rydalmeer, Sydney, New South Wales

Massingham has marched on ANZAC Days for the last few years in full Army uniform, complete with Sergeants stripes, seven medals and a coveted Infantry Combat Badge (ICB). The photograph below was taken on ANZAC Day 2013.

The ill fitting uniform worn by Massingham prompted research which led us to believe that Massingham has never served in the Australian Defence Force, resulting in a phone call to him, to explain his behaviour.

This is a simple case of fraud, deception, detection and confession. As well as being noticed by genuine veterans, Massingham foolishly placed photographs onto his Facebook page. In addition to the photograph above, he also inserted a photograph showing him “rigged” for desert warfare, complete with scarf and pistol.

 

Most wannabes we confront with damning evidence deny the allegations and threaten legal or physical retribution. David Massingham knew the game was up, and “fell on his sword” in a gentlemanly way and offered profuse apologies to the veteran community.

Wearing a full Army Service uniform complete with seven medals and an ICB is a serious criminal offence. If found guilty, the offence attracts a maximum fine of $3,300 and six months imprisonment or both.

We are sure that David Massingham is contrite, but it is more about being caught, than committing the crime. Had we not stopped Massingham he would have again featured as a

Returned Veteran Sergeant on ANZAC Day 2014

For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction, in this instance, the reaction is a life sentence for Massingham on our web site, as will be the case for all of those who trespass on the honour of the Australian and New Zealand Veteran Community.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from the private citizens are supported by statement of fact and statutory declarations.

Surname: Masters
Christian Names: Ronald William
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Kingaroy
Service: Army
Branch: Artillery
Case Notes:

Ron Masters of Kingaroy blames the RSL for his wearing of medals he is not entitled to wear.

He says the RSL told him to wear all the medals shown in the photograph below, except he alone decided to wear the end one which is the ridiculous self purchased “Simpson Medal” that is sold by the Ex Service Organisation called the Injured Service Persons Association (ISPA).  We suggest if you value your integrity don’t wear the Simpson Medal as it is only for donkeys.

 

 

The medals that Masters is wearing indicate that he served for fifteen years in the Army. He is wearing six medals, he should not be wearing four of them, yet he is entitled to wear two others.

He is not entitled to wear:

The Defence Service Medal – the third from the left. The wearer must have fifteen years diligent Service.

The National Medal – the fourth from the left. The National Medal recognises long and diligent service by members of recognised organisations that help the community during times of crisis.

Vietnam Campaign Medal – fifth from the left – This award was issued by the South Vietnamese Government for six months (181 days) service in South Vietnam. Those who were evacuated from Vietnam, as casualties, as a direct result of enemy action also received this award.

The last medal, the so called, Simpson “Medal” is a self purchase trinket that must not be worn with genuine medals on the left breast.

Master’s true entitlement is four medals as follows:

First Medal - Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75

Second Medal – Vietnam Medal

Third Medal - Australian Defence Medal

Fourth Medal - National Servicemen’s Commemorative Medal

 

Masters enlisted as a National Serviceman on the 22 April 1970. After recruit training he was allotted to the Royal Australian Artillery Corps, where he received further training and on the 15th Sep 1970 qualified as a Storeman.

He departed for Vietnam with his unit, 12th Field Regiment, Royal Australian Artillery on the 4th May 1971. On 18th October 1971 he was medically evacuated to Australia via Butterworth, Malaysia.

He had spent 170 days in Vietnam and his medical evacuation was not a result of enemy action. It is believed he was involved in an accident involving trauma and injury to his shoulder and neck.

Masters has two Record of Service cards on his file, they describe his Army Service from start to finish, and these two cards are shown below.

 

 

Even though he was wearing four medals he was not entitled to wear, and not wearing two medals he was entitled to, Master’s offence is on the lower end of the wannabe scale.  Any reasonable war veteran who is a member of an RSL would be well aware of his correct medal entitlement. For Masters to state that it was the RSL’s fault is an act of immaturity.

Australian Veterans and the general public are much more aware of offences against Veterans than ever before.  If you offend it is most likely you will be reported and be exposed on our web site,

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from private citizens are supported by statements of fact and statutory declarations.

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