Entries with Surname (Title)s starting with 'D'

Surname: Coret
Christian Names: Gerardus Cornelius
Country: Australia
State or Province: TAS
City or Town: Lilydale
Service #: 37866680
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Gerardus (Gerry) Coret, Justice of the Peace and President of the Lilydale (Tasmania) RSL Sub-Branch, served 376 days in Vietnam as part of the 5th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment.

Coret 1 2

The above photo of Coret was taken in December 2015 at the Lilydale District School, where the Avenue of Honour, a garden area that honours fallen soldiers from the Lilydale region, was officially opened as part of local ANZAC Centenary commemorations. Coret can be seen here with his campaign medals proudly displayed.

Coret 2

In September 2015, Coret attended a wreath laying at the Lilydale Cenotaph as part of the “Centenary Experience” display in that town. This was just one of the hundreds of commemorative events conducted throughout Australia for the Centenary of ANZAC.

Again, Coret can be seen displaying his medals and one could assume he wears these same medals to all official RSL-related functions, and has done so for some time. He should be proud of the medals he received for his active military service, and also his continuing service as a member of the RSL Sub-Branch Executive.

Coret, however, cannot be proud of the fact he has attached a commemorative, or as more commonly known, a ‘tin medal’, to his Service medals. Doing such may impress those that do not know, however, you do not fool your fellow veterans, who would recognise you had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

Coret 3

The Front Line Service Medal was issued by the 2/12 Infantry Battalion Association, based in Queensland, to identify those who took part in World War Two front line actions with the Infantry, differentiating them from other units. It was manufactured and sold by that Association as a funds raising exercise. They made a lot of money selling this tin trinket to gullible people, who had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

Defence Honours and Awards has this to say about such medals:

“Medals not listed in the order of wear may be worn officially, on an unrestricted basis, only with the express permission of the Governor-General. As a general rule, such permission is extended only to official awards of foreign governments. It has never been extended to private commemorative medals. Those medals should not be worn at all, and certainly never on the left hand side and mounted with officially issued medals”.

Coret has deliberately flouted Government policy in order to give himself just that little more recognition and set himself apart from other Veterans. What he does not seem to understand is that he does not need that piece of ‘tin’ to show his ‘front line’ service as that has been adequately recognised by the Infantry Combat Badge he also wears on his suit.

Perhaps Coret could take onboard some advice from his Hobart cousins, who for a number of years have put out an instruction before each ANZAC Day, regarding dress, saluting and etiquette, stating at section 7:

“Occasionally a person will wrongly claim to be a returned veteran and wear medals to which they are not entitled. This practice is deceitful and disrespectful to the veteran community. Further, there are a number of unofficial medals not recognized through the Australian Honours system which should not be worn at events such as ANZAC Day”.

Gerardus (Gerry) Cornelius Coret, your Vietnam service has earned you the medals that you can be proud to wear. However, by adding a worthless commemorative 'tin' medal, you have earned yourself a place, in the ever-increasing numbers of RSL Sub-Branch Executives, who choose to flout protocol and convention, and in doing bring discredit on the Honours and Awards system and Veterans who have been awarded legitimate medals.

Surname: DeJager
Christian Names: Bartus Cornelius
Country: Australia
State or Province: WA
City or Town: Geraldton
Case Notes:

Bartus Cornelius (Ray) DeJager of Geraldton, Western Australia is a blustering bully who believes he can be part of the Veteran Community just by saying he is. Unfortunately for him he has said it whilst under oath in a Court of Law.

At this stage we have no photograph of DeJager and seek assistance from any person who may provide one.

We hold Statements declaring that DeJager claims to have served in Malaysia, Burma and Vietnam.

He has claimed that:
 

DeJager-1

DeJager was a key witness in a court case in Geraldton where he made ridiculous claims about his "Vietnam Service". Below is a relevant page from the Court proceedings where DeJager has taken an oath on a bible to tell the truth. His veracity is under scrutiny, and he lies to the court about why his honesty cannot be questioned.

DeJager-2

Note that he claims the bible is "very dear to him because one of them saved his life whilst serving in Vietnam”. According to DeJager, in Vietnam a bible he was carrying in his pocket, stopped a bullet and saved his life. All that he has said to defend his honour is a lie, and therefore, none of the evidence he gave in court should be accepted as the truth.

There is no record of DeJager ever having served with the Australian Defence Force and he was never in Vietnam. If he served in Malaysia or Burma it was not with the Australian Defence Force.

DeJager appears to have committed numerous criminal offences including:

Falsely claiming to be a returned veteran, and lying under oath. (perjury)

DeJager is a lying blustering fool and wannabe.  He is well qualified to feature on our web site.

This is published in the public interest, veterans of all conflicts, in particular that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from the private citizens are supported by statement of fact and statutory declarations.

Persons appearing on our site that are now deceased will not be removed, but the case will have the word "Deceased" placed next to their name when we are advised.

Surname: Delaforce
Christian Names: Raymond Richard
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Emu Park
Service #: 1733581
Service: Army
Branch: RAE
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

Delaforce 1

At any ANZAC Day service there is a press photographer looking for an opportunity to get a photo that adds atmosphere to the meaning of the day and those participating in it.  ANZAC Day 2016, at Emu Park in Queensland, provided just that opportunity. Raymond Richard Delaforce looks the epitome of the casual and humble attitude displayed by Veterans on such an important day.

Delaforce served 282 days in Vietnam as part of the 1st Field Squadron, Royal Australian Engineers, as the Vietnam War Service certificate, below, shows.

Delaforce 2

An extract of 1st SQN’s service history in Vietnam:

3 Field Troop of 1 FD SQN was deployed to the War in South Vietnam and arrived in Bien Hoa Province on 28 September 1965. When the Australian Task Force was established at Nui Dat in Phouc Tuy Province, the remainder of 1 FD SQN deployed and arrived at Nui Dat on 9 June 1966. The unit was expanded to include 21 Engineer Support Troop, a plant troop, HQ troop, and an expanded RAEME Workshop. In addition, the three combat engineer troops each had an establishment of two officers, a staff sergeant, a sergeant, three corporals, three lance corporals and Sappers to a strength of 65 all ranks. The unit was designated as ”1 FD SQN GP RAE”. The unit returned to Australia in 1972 as a part of the Australian withdrawal from the Vietnam War, and was re-located to Holsworthy.

In the above picture Delaforce is wearing his official medals, all awarded for his service as a ‘Sapper’ with the Royal Australian Engineers. On the left lapel, along with a number of badge-pins, is attached the ‘Front Line’ commemorative medal, not an official medal, in fact nothing more than a worthless trinket.

Delaforce 3

Above, is a picture of the offending item. The Front Line Service Medal was issued by the 2/12 Infantry Battalion Association, based in Queensland, to identify those who took part in World War Two front line actions with the Infantry, differentiating them from other units. It was manufactured and sold by that Association as a funds raising exercise. They made a lot of money selling this tin trinket to gullible people, who had no association with the 2/12 Infantry Battalion whatsoever.

Defence Honours and Awards has this to say about such medals:

“Medals not listed in the order of wear may be worn officially, on an unrestricted basis, only with the express permission of the Governor-General. As a general rule, such permission is extended only to official awards of foreign governments. It has never been extended to private commemorative medals. Those medals should not be worn at all, and certainly never on the left hand side and mounted with officially issued medals”.

Now, reading the above, one could argue that Delaforce does not have the ‘tin’ medal mounted with his official medals. The thing appears on the left side of his jacket, with his official medals, and anyone not ‘in the know’ would not realise this.

There is also the glaring issue that Delaforce, who served in the Engineers, is wearing an item produced to commemorate service with the Infantry. What was he thinking when he pinned it on?

Raymond Delaforce, obviously the photographer thought it worthy to take that snap of you on that day, as a result of your folly, you are worthy to earn a permanent place on the ANZMI website.

 

Surname: Delamore
Christian Names: Kenneth Rex and Jo
Country: Australia
State or Province: ACT
City or Town: Canberra
Service #: 2817398
Service: Army
Branch: Chaplain Army Reserve - Now Red Shield Representat
Commencement of service: 7 Feb 01 - Aug 02
Completion of service: Still Serving
Case Notes:

 

 

 

We are reliably advised that Kenneth Rex Delamore served in the Australian Army Reserve as a Chaplain for 19 months and would have worn the uniform of an Army Chaplain during that time. He and his wife have now donned the quasi Army uniform of Salvation Army Red Shield workers and are employed at Royal Military College, Duntroon in Canberra, ACT. 

The Defence Force accepts that members of the Salvation Army Red Shield organization may wear Military Officers uniform without badges or military rank. Instead they wear the Salvation Army logo of the Red Shield. We note also that a Sam Browne is involved, this is the leather strap over the right shoulder which attaches to a leather waste belt. The Sam Browne is used to support a sword. We have no idea when a Salvation Army Red Shield representative might need to wield a sword.

The Delamores are both wearing medals, Kenneth Delamore is wearing:

NZ Defence Service Medal (NZDSM) with two bars - As we have no information about his NZ service, we will give him a free kick and assume he is entitled to the NZDSM

Australian Defence Medal (ADM)- He served for only 19 months as an Army Reserve Chaplain and therefore, at the time of publishing this report he is not entitled to the medal.

International Year of Volunteer Medal (IYVM) - Self purchased "Tin" medal, that is not worn on military uniform.

New Zealand Fire Brigade Long Service and Good Conduct Medal (NZFBLSGCM) with two bars - Not an authorised medal to wear on Australian military uniform.

Jo Delamore is wearing:

International year of Volunteer Medal - Self purchased "Tin" medal.

Old soldiers will also note that in both cases the chin strap buckle is in the wrong place. Tradition demands that the buckle must be level with the edge of the mouth.

We contacted the Chief Commissioner (National) of the Red Shield organisation. His comments are indicative that the problem with Philanthropic Organisations starts at the very top. In response to our notification to him about the Delamores, he chose to disparage the Defence Force and ANZMI.

He said this about RSMs

"Ken sort (sic) advice from his RSM at 2 RAR at the time and he took the advice in good faith. After investigating it further he realised that there may be more to it and remedied the situation by not wearing the other medals on his military uniform."

"I would challenge you to try and get any form of coherence from RSMs about honours and awards when it comes to philanthropic personnel and I guarantee you will get differing advice",


He also suggests that Red Shield workers should wear whatever medals they like. We previously exposed one of his colleagues Barry Nancarrow for mixing a Salvation Army Medal with his official Defence rack. See here: www.anzmi.net/index.php/component/sobipr...63&sid=336:Nancarrow

The commissioner said:

"As for Barry Nancarrow he is not a fraud and should not be on your website. Barry has earned every medal he wears your ridicule of him is a disgrace"

Religious medals have no place being mixed with Defence Medals. We suggest the Commissioner appraise himself of Defence Honours and Awards protocols and traditions and his duties as leader, so that his flock don't end up on this web site. Blaming RSMs for his lack of knowledge and the recalcitrance of his staff is the epitome of "Buck passing".

We point out to the Commissioner and the Delamores that medals are presented by the Sovereign to those who have earned them. Attaching whatever you fancy onto the left side of your shirt will fool some of the people some of the time, but Veterans and ex Servicemen who have earned their medals the hard way, see buffoons living in a world of pretence.

Australian and New Zealand Veterans have zero tolerance for medals cheats, therefore the Delamore's recalcitrance will be featured on this web site forever more.

Surname: Dempsey
Christian Names: Laurence Francis
Country: Australia
State or Province: SA
City or Town: Edwardstown
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: 4 Jun 1946
Completion of service: 6May 1947
Case Notes:

Laurence Francis Dempsey of Edwardstown, South Australia

 

Age does not weary them. Whenever we knock one down two more appear.

 Laurence Francis Dempsey is an octogenarian, who has for many years been fooling all who will listen, into believing he is a damaged Veteran of World War II and Korea. Not only is Dempsey a liar about his military history, he was an administrative and discipline burden during the time he claimed to be “Driving the Japanese out of Papua New Guinea”

Here is what Dempsey said to a reporter on ANZAC Day 2011.

 

 

We have accessed Dempsey’s Defence File and here are the facts.

 

Dempsey Joined the Army in April 1945 aged 19 years and 3 months not 16 years as told in the article.

 

His service did not take him to Papua New Guinea and later Korea. During his service he never left Australia.

 

 

Notice in Part D it shows:

Active Service in Australia 682 days

Active Service O/S Australia……days

Proving that Dempsey never left our shores

Dempsey was never a Prisoner of war, but was often in Military Detention Centres because of his propensity to be absent without leave. See below his Record of Service, which is a Diary of Shame. Dempsey was an administrative burden to the Australian Army at a time when the Nation was fighting to defend our way of life.

 

 

His “Sad memories” could only have been for being caught and punished for being absent without leave.

If he has fingers missing from his right hand it was not from a sword stroke from a Korean Prison Guard as punishment for heroically taking the blame “For a mate who stole an egg”.

Dempsey was discharged from the Army in May 1947 and from our experience we are sure that the Army was glad to see him off.

Dempsey is a liar and a wannabe and thus he is hereby named and shamed for extolling a false military history that showed him to be something he was not. Succinctly put, he was “nuisance to the Defence Force and a sad sack of a soldier” on the other hand; we are pleased to be able to exhibit the true military history of this liar and wannabe.

Welcome to our web site Laurence Francis Dempsey.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from private citizens are supported by statements of fact and statutory declarations.

Surname: Dey
Christian Names: Victor Albert
Country: Australia
State or Province: Victoria
City or Town: Bundoora
Service #: 31529
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Approx 1950
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

Victor Albert Dey was born on Anzac Day, 25 April, 1930. He is currently the National President of the Korea Veterans Association of Australia. (KVAA)

Dey served with 3 Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment in Korea. He served in Korea from the 7 June, 1952 until the 9 June, 1953.

 

Dey1

 

 

Dey2jpg



In the above photographs Dey is wearing the following medals. The last two medals on his rack are tin trinkets.

1. Medal of the Order of Australia. (OAM)
2. Australian Active Service Medal 1945 -1975 clasp Korea. (AASM 45-75)
3. Korea Medal.
4. United Nations Service Medal for Korea.
5. Australian Service Medal. 1945 – 1975. Clasp unknown. (ASM 45-75)
6. Australian Defence Medal.
7. The Republic of Korea War Service Medal. - Tin purchased.
8. Korean Ambassador for Peace Medal. – Tin purchased.

 

Dey3



The above is the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Dey4




The above is the Korean Ambassador for Peace Medal.

The adornment worn around his neck is an unofficial Korean special military coin, with ribbon. It was initially introduced in the United States as a commemorative gesture to those who served in Korea. It can be purchased for about 50 US dollars.

Dey has been the President of the KVAA for many years. We have been reliably informed that Dey has continued to wear the tin trinket medals during his time as President of the Association, even ignoring advice, that if worn at all, they should be worn on the right, with other commemorative medals.

As a result of this and other dissention within the KVAA , 60 Korean Veterans resigned from Dey’s Association and formed their own Korea Veteran’s Sub Branch of the Victorian Returned and Services League. (R&SL.)

Dey, as National President of the Korea Veterans Association of Australia is setting a bad example for his committee and members.

There are numerous members of the Association he is President of that wear these tin trinkets. Quite a few appear on this site.

Dey has been appropriately rewarded for his valuable service in Korea, and he should be proud to have been awarded and wear the three genuine medals issued for that conflict.

Powered by SobiPro