Entries with Surname (Title)s starting with 'C'

Surname: Cullum
Christian Names: Kenneth
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Cleveland
Service #: 714379
Service: Army
Branch: Artillery
Commencement of service: 03 Jan 1955
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

Kenneth Colin Cullum never saw active service, however he was called up for National Service and trained in artillery. He continued his service to the country and community through various organisations. In 2000, he was awarded the Emergency Services Medal for his service with Queensland State Emergency Service (QLD SES).

Cullum has also held executive positions in ex-Service organisations, his most recent, as Secretary of the National Servicemen’s Association of Queensland, Redlands Branch.

One would think that after many year’s involvement in such organisations, Cullum would be aware of medal protocols, or he simply chose to ignore them, as the following illustrates.

Cullum 1 2

The above photograph was taken at the 2015 Remembrance Day service at Redlands, Queensland.

Cullum 2

 

Cullum is wearing the following medals:

1. Emergency Services Medal – awarded in 2000 for service to the QLD SES.

2. National Medal – entitlement unknown as the medal was never officially awarded.

3. Australian Defence Medal – entitled.

4. Anniversary of National Service Medal – entitled.

5. International Year of the Volunteer Medal – an unofficial commemorative medal and not to be worn with official medals.

 

CullumNASHROLL

 

 

 

Cullum 3

 

The National Medal was established on 14 February 1975 as one of the original elements of the distinctive Australian system of honours and awards. The Medal recognises long and diligent service in organisations that protect life and property at some risk to their members. Many, but not all, eligible groups are uniformed. The Medal is awarded to persons for long service in eligible organisations who fulfil the primary function and meet other criteria. Fifteen year’s eligible service is necessary to qualify for the Medal. Clasps are available for each additional 10-year period.

The Governor-General awards the National Medal. Nominations are made by the chief officer of the nominee’s organisation. The chief officer of each approved organisation also administers the medal for that organisation. The award recognises long service in approved organisations that protect life and property at some risk to their members. Many, but not all, eligible groups are uniformed. Fifteen years’ service is required to qualify. Clasps are available for each additional ten years’ service.

Cullum may very well have qualified for the award of the National Medal, by virtue of his service with the QLD SES, however, until the medal is applied for in the correct manner and approved for issue, then he is not entitled to wear it.

Cullum 4

 

The above shows the result of a search of the Australian Honours and Awards database. Cullum has been awarded the Emergency Services Medal, but not the National Medal.

Cullum 5

The United Nations (UN) passed a resolution on December 2000 declaring that 2001 would be the International Year of Volunteers (IYV). This resolution adopted by the General Assembly was endorsed and co-sponsored by 60 countries, including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Malta and The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

The colours of the ribbon depict the light blue, being the Internationally recognised colour of the United Nations Medal and the orange, being the colour for the International Year of Volunteer Medal.

In short, this is not an official medal, it is no more than a decorative trinket and is not to be worn with official medals.

Kenneth Colin Cullum, you have had an outstanding life of community service, for which you have been appropriately recognised. However, your actions in respect of your medals has sullied this service, disrespected veterans and, perhaps, even disrespected yourself.

The fact that your actions took place whilst an executive member of an ex-Service organisation compounds your culpability and casts a cloud over those organisations that continually turn a blind eye to such practices. You are now among like-minded colleagues on the ANZMI website.

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