Entries with Surname (Title)s starting with 'B'

Surname: Blanch aka Thompson
Christian Names: Jaydon P also uses initials A.
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Cambden
Service #: N/A
Service: N/A
Branch: N/A
Commencement of service: N/A
Completion of service: N/A
Case Notes:

 

 

The worst kind of wannabes are those who claim Special Forces heroic service. They also blame their bad social behaviour on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) resulting from their "operational war service". Jaydon P Blanch also known as A.C Blanch and Jaydon Thompson is such a person.

Blanch1 2017 04 08

Blanch2 2017 04 08

Notice in the left hand photograph Blanch is wearing a Medal Riband Bar on his lapel. The Riband Bar is for the Australian Afghanistan Medal - Operation Slipper. The second photograph is also of Blanch but he has named himself Jay Thompson.

Blanch3 2017 04 08

Blanch4 2017 04 08

We have Statutory Declarations from people who have stated:

"Jaydon said he was in the Australian Forces and:

Was often away overseas for long periods of time on tours. In 2013 he claimed to have completed six tours in Afghanistan and in more recent times claims nine tours

He said he was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) .

He claims he had previously served as a Pilot in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) until his eyesight became bad and moved to SASR as a Sniper, where he stayed for Eighteen years.

He said he suffered badly from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and was shot twice in Afghanistan

Was discharged in 2013 and is waiting for a large payout".

Below is an excerpt from his Facebook page where he uses the name Jay Thompson.

Blanch5 2017 04 08

Notice he tells about his "tours in combat" and he is thinking of his friends who fell along the way.

We phoned Blanch on the 3rd February 2017 and he denied ever having mentioned to any person that he had served in Afghanistan with SASR. He said he served in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) for a very short time during 1993 and 1994. In the above insert he say his father served in Vietnam. He was asked what his father's name was, and he said William HAIG. No person with that name served in Vietnam.

Blanch explained the Facebook entry (shown above) by saying that someone had hacked his account and written the lies about his service history.

He is currently operating a model train business using the name of Jay Thompson.

Blanch6 2017 04 08

We can find no trace of Jaydon Blanch or Jay Thompson ever having served in the Australian Defence Force. He may have served for a very short time in the RAN, but by his own admission never served in the RAAF or the Army with SASR.

Regarding his false claims of expecting a "large payout" for his Army service. He has "conned" people for loans, using the non existent expected "Large Payout" as collateral.

Blanch was advised to complete a Statutory Declaration denying what others have said in Statutory Declarations. He was advised that his Statutory Declaration would be sent to Federal Police with the view of establishing whether he has made a false declaration. He has not responded.

In his house he has an engraved glass plaque from "his unit" SASR, commemorating his Eighteen years of service. His rank engraved on the plaque is "Lt Colonel". We have spoken to the proprietor of the shop that supplied the plaque, and established that the plaque was ordered, purchased and paid for by Jaydon P Blanch.

Like all "PTSD wracked" lying wannabes, Blanch uses his false service to charm vulnerable people and con them into providing him with money.

Blanch is a pathological liar who now joins many of his ilk on our website. We will also report his deceit to NSW State Police. We welcome him to our Hall of Shame where he will stay for many years so that any person typing his name into an Internet Search Engines will be aware of his true nature.

Surname: Boese
Christian Names: Sydney Keith
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Worongary
Service: NZ Army
Case Notes:

Updated 03 Nov 2013

Sydney Keith BOESE, Date of Birth, 3 July, 1938 of Worongary, Queensland, claims to have served in Malaya and Borneo with the New Zealand Army, Service Number 775278. To see why he appears on our site, see below -;

 

As yet,  we have not been able to prove or disprove if Sydney Boese served in the New Zealand Army with the 2 ndBattalion or in Malaya. We did receive a copy of a number of documents from unknown sources. These include his Statement of Service with the New Zealand Defence Force, which appears to be a computer generated document, as well as a signed declaration to join an organization by Sydney Boese, in which he claims to have served in Malaya and Borneo.

You will notice the dates of service are from 27 April 1959 to 24 July 1960.  We will refer to this when we identify his medals and service in Borneo. It would be appreciated if anyone could advise us if the Statement of Service is the correct Certificate of Service for that time period.

We are in possession of a Statutory Declaration, together with other information on Sydney Boese.

Sydney Boese could not have served in Borneo as he was no longer in the New Zealand Army, (According to his Statement of Service) as elements of the 1 stRoyal New Zealand Infantry Regiment were not deployed to Borneo till May 1965. He would also have been awarded the General Service Medal 1962 with clasp Borneo.

Sydney Boese is a member of the Southport RSL in Queensland and also the following organizations -; the Coastguard, Australian American Association and the Gold Coast Show.

When you look at the two photos of Boese, he is wearing three official Medals as well as three unofficial commemorative medals. The first three medals are official medals issued by the New Zealand Defence Force. The official medals from left to right are as follows -;

New Zealand Operational Medal.

General Service Medal 1918-1962, clasp possibly Malaya.

Pingat Jasa Malaysia Medal. (official commemorative medal issued by the Malaysian Government)

The other three medals are unofficial commemorative medals (better known as Tin medals which serve no purpose) that can be purchased at Medal Shops and should never be worn on the left breast, especially with awarded official medals.

The fourth medal is the Compulsory Military Training Medal 1949 to 1958 which looks similar to the Australian Service Medal 1945-1975. Now if Sydney Boese’s Statement of Service is correct, he should not be wearing this unofficial medal as his service began in 1959.

The fifth medal is the unofficial 150 thAnniversary of the New Zealand Army Medal.

The unofficial medal which he wears separately on the left breast is the commemorative 90 thAnniversary of the Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association.

It is clear that Sydney Boese conducts himself as some kind of hero by wearing extra medals he is not officially entitled to wear.

The average citizen would not know the difference between an official and an unofficial medal or if it is a campaign, long service or a defence service medal. Seeing a serving or ex-serving member of the Defence Force wearing a large rack of medals would most likely give them the impression the person must have been involved in a number of conflicts.

The RSL Sub-Branch of Southport would have the file dealing with the Protocol of Wearing Medals and the instructions relating to the wearing of unofficial commemorative medals. The members of the committee at the Southport RSL should be enforcing these protocols and leading by example ensuring that all members of the Sub-Branch adhere to the correct wearing of medals.

This applies to all ex service organizations.  Should they fail to follow these instructions, which have also been published by the Government and the RSL itself, they are failing in their responsibility as committee members by allowing anyone into their organizations to wear tin medals.

Sydney Boese, you and others like you, who wear unofficial commemorative medals and those that allow you to wear such tin medals, show a complete lack of respect to all current and former servicemen and women, who comply with the correct wearing of medals issued to them and feel they don’t have to enhance their service to the nation by wearing medals that have to be purchased.

If you are not aware of it, the New Zealand Defence Force has an official medal you would be entitled to wear called the New Zealand Defence Service Medal which can be worn with one of four different clasps on submitting an application if you did serve at all.

Sydney Boese, for your lack of respect regarding the wearing of medals you will grace our web site. Our advice to you is to get rid of the tin medals and wear medals that have been officially awarded to you.

Update 3 Nov 2013

The Southport Returned Services League (RSL) Sub Branch in Queensland rewards medal cheats that appear on our site by voting them into executive positions as is the case with Sydney Keith Boese as well as Mark Tull, who was voted in as Secretary and also appears on our site at the following link.

http://www.anzmi.net/index.php/component/sobipro/?pid=63&sid=372:Tull

Is it no wonder that many ex-servicemen including the younger veterans will not have anything to do with the RSL when they fail to uphold the proper protocols of wearing medals and instead of suspending medals cheats, they reward them by voting them onto the Sub-Branch committees.
 
It shows that such Sub-Branches have no integrity or honour towards ex-servicemen as a whole but only their own wellbeing in maintaining the numbers that they have.

It is time that the Queensland State RSL sent a clear message to their Sub-Branches to uphold the proper protocols and traditions of the RSL to earn the respect of ex-servicemen, and maybe then they will encourage more members to join the League.

 

Update - Sydney Keith "Slim" Boese -  02 Nov 14

The ex New Zealand Army Veteran, Sydney "Slim" Boese attended the Queensland Returned Services League (RSL) 2014 Annual General Meeting in Townsville, Far North Queensland.

One would opine that an exposed medals cheat would not have the audacity to attend an RSL State Annual General Meeting (AGM) still wearing "Tin" medals. The offensive medals are the last two that are shown in the photo above and in our original exposure.

From the smile on his face it appears that no person at the RSL meeting deigned to advise Boese that his behaviour is offensive. In 2013 Boese was Treasurer of the Southport RSL. As the RSL has not published details of its 2014 Committee following their AGM in June 2014 we don't know if Boese is still a senior executive. If he is, it is a damn disgrace that this ex New Zealand serviceman is allowed to get away with flouting the traditions of ANZAC Veterans. The New Zealand Goverment has the same policy about "Tin" Medals as the Australian Government and that is.
if you must wear them, wear them on the right side. Those who add them to their Defence medals and wear them on their left breast obviously have psychological issues.

We ask the Southport RSL to lift their game, and advise Boese to get the medals off his NZ Defence rack.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from private citizens are supported by statements of fact and statutory declarations.

Persons appearing on our site that are now deceased will not be removed, but the case will have the word "Deceased" placed next to their name when we are advised.

 

Update Boese 16 Jan 16

So it seems that the committee and members of the Southport RSL Sub-branch still don't get it!  Either that or they simply don't care about the adverse publicity they have had directed at them by ANZMI.

 

As stated in a recent Southport Sub-branch newsletter, "There has been a significant amount of turmoil within the management of the sub-branch and all members should be made aware of some of the circumstances of this turmoil."  Seems to be some similarity to the shuffling the deck-chairs on the Titanic!

The fact that both the former president and deputy president should not only resign their positions on the sub-branch committee but also from the RSL sub-branch itself! Seems that something is indeed rotten in the State of Southport. Although one of the resignations, that of president Lawrie Pollard, will not see any ANZMI flags lowered to half-mast. Pollard was himself the subject of a very in-depth investigation by ANZMI.

However, our real concern at the latest fractious behaviour within the sub-branch executive is the appointment of wannabe Sydney 'Slim' Boese to the positions of vice president and treasurer!  We suspect, that like the SS Titanic, there are icebergs aplenty on the horizon for the Southport RSL Sub-branch. 

 

 

 

(Insert BOESE update 2)

 

 

 

Surname: Bolam
Christian Names: Rodney
Country: Australia
State or Province: Quensland
City or Town: Goomeri
Case Notes:

Rodney Bolam has never served in the Australian Military or Defence Forces. He even failed the call-up for National Service as he was rejected after attempting to volunteer . Undeterred by this state of affairs, Bolam decided to steal the identity of a genuine veteran and use this for his own purposes. Masquerading as a former SASR soldier and wearing fake medals including a Military Cross identical to the real veteran, he attempted to start a Special Air Service Association in Cairns, Far North Queensland. When confronted about the veracity of his claims and his claimed identity, true to form with imposters, he threatened legal action.

The accompanying newspaper articles tell the rest.

There is no need for expansion on the fine job done by the reporters in the accompanying articles. Read it all and judge this man for yourself. 

Be warned, Rodney Bolam may be residing in your area and still pulling the same caper. If so, CPMH would be interested in knowing his whereabouts so the authorities can be notified.

 

 

6th Oct 2012

 

Update Rodney Allan Bolam aka Rodney Allan McAuley

 

Rodney Bolam has shown up in Goomeri Queensland, a small town in the Burnett region with a population of just under 500 people and a Returned Services League (RSL) Sub Branch to which Bolam had attached himself.  Here is a recent photograph taken at the Goomeri RSL.

 

We have now learned that Rodney Bolam has served in the Army, but under a different name.  He served as 2789041 Rodney Allan McAuley. He was enlisted as a National Serviceman on the 7th Feb 1968 and after initial assessment became an Officer Cadet, which is a Commissioned Officer in training. He was unsuccessful as an Officer Candidate and was discharged from the Army on 9th Nov 1968. Here is his Discharge Certificate:

 

 

At some stage after his departure from the Military, Bolam changed his name from Rodney Allan McAuley to Rodney Allan Bolam.  He was caught lying about his military service in Cairns, Queensland and charged and convicted in Darwin, Northern Territory by Federal Police. Now he is committing the same offences in Goomeri Queensland.

In Goomeri he was the official flag raiser for the Goomeri RSL. As a member of the RSL he kept quiet about his false military exploits, but was quick to relate stories to any “out of towners” who would listen to him. On the 16 Jul 2012 he met a genuine veteran visiting Goomeri. That Veteran has provided a Statutory Declaration regarding the casual meeting. Here are excerpts from the Statutory Declaration.

“We were introduced to him as Rodney McAuley and he was told that I also was a Vietnam Veteran as was this person.  This chap was very engaging and I invited him to join us and we got to talk about our Vietnam experiences.

He said he volunteered for National Service rather than wait for his number to come up, (he said it actually did come up in anyway) and a couple of days after recruit training started he applied for officer training and he and another recruit were accepted.

He went to Scheyville and graduated as a 2nd Lieutenant and went to Vietnam in C Company 2 RAR. He said he was there during the TET Offensive and also at Fire Support Base CORAL.

He said he retired in 1975 with the rank of Captain.

He also revealed he had only just got his TPI pension. He got caught between two mortars and that they were still digging shrapnel out of his back. He told me of the American hospital he was evacuated to  (not Vung Tau) but I can’t remember the name.

I, normally a strong skeptic, was thoroughly convinced, and produced my iPad with a few pictures including ones on my old unit’s xxxxxx xxxxxxx  web site.  This man knew all the military jargon and upon seeing a photo soon pointed out points of interest around Nui Dat. He also recognized photos of CORAL.  quite a few other fanciful stories told by him emerged.

I told him quite a few of my personal experiences of my service in Vietnam and no doubt if he goes onto another similar adventure in another town they will be added to his personal library of experiences and naturally I feel uncomfortable about this.  After decades of perfecting this technique he may very well surely succeed again”

Bolam did not graduate from training as a commissioned officer, but was discharged from the Army before he completed the Officer Training course.

He never served in Vietnam, never attained the rank of Captain, and was never wounded in action.  He is a liar a fraud and a wannabe and should be treated as such by all who meet him.

Bolam aka McAuley is an enemy of Veterans, do not allow him to continue stealing the honour of  Returned Servicemen and Women.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from private citizens are supported by statements of fact and statutory declarations.

 

Surname: Booth
Christian Names: Ian/Iain Montgomery
Country: Phillipines
State or Province: Angeles City
City or Town: Angeles City
Service #: 02407
Service: Royal Australian Navy
Branch: Seaman
Commencement of service: 06 Mar 67
Completion of service: Jun 71
Case Notes:

 

Iain Booth was born on the 25 April, 1949. In 1967, he enlisted in the Royal Australian Navy as a Cadet Midshipman. In the following years he progressed to Sub Lieutenant. He is a Medals Cheat and a false pretender. Booth wears seven medals. He is entitled to wear four.

Booth1jpg 2018 02 08

 

Booth1Ajpgjpg 2018 02 08

In the above 2017 Remembrance Day photograph, taken at Angeles City, near Manilla, Phillipines, Booth is wearing the following medals.

1. The Australian Active Serve Medal - (AASM) Entitled.
2. Vietnam Medal. (VM) Not entitled
3. Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal. – (VLSM) Entitled.
4. Australian Service Medal. (ASM) Entitled
5. Australian Defence Medal. (ADM)Entitled.
6. U.S Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, with a "Combat V clasp. Not entitled.
7. Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. (RVCM) Not entitled.

Concerns were raised by individuals in Australia and the Phillippines, regarding Australian military medals worn by Booth. He also falsely claimed service on HMAS Hobart, a Royal Australian Navy Destroyer, in June, 1968. ANZMI are in possession of signed statements of fact in regards to lies told by Booth regarding Hobart service, at the time he claims. .

It appears that the medals he wears are not consistent with his actual RAN service. In particular, the VM and the VLSM cannot be worn together. You are issued with one or the other. He has been warned in writing several times by RSL Sub Branch Executives about not conforming with medals protocols and wearing medals he is not entitled to. Booth also made other comments to others about his alleged RAN service that are false.

ANZMI then researched the public records, regarding the Royal Australian Navy career of Ian Booth, as he was known then, and arrived at the same conclusion. He has since changed his first name to "Iain."

ANZMI then communicated with Mr Iain Booth and asked him for a summary of his Naval service and the medals that he wears. His response, inter alia, is below -;

I readily concede that there has been an error in my medal issue and that the VLSM cannot be issued with the Vietnam Medal, but the fact that my medals were all issued and named to me is not my error and I therefore feel that I am entitled to wear them. It would be less than prudent to knowingly wear medals that were supposedly not issued together (unless in error) as this would doubtlessly bring into question my entitlement.

Following that idiotic statement, we believe that Booth not only lives in another country, he lives on another planet.

We should all be glad that the Department of Defence did not send him a Victoria Cross in “error”. With Booth’s view on medals protocol, he would have had that medal court mounted and worn as well, claiming that he is entitled to wear it, as "it was not his error!"

The three medals that Booth and ANZMI know that he is not entitled to wear, are the Vietnam Medal (VM), the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. (RVCM) and the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, with clasp.

1. The Vietnam Medal.

Booth2 2018 02 08



Qualification requirement
Australia

Qualifying service for the Vietnam Medal includes:
• 28 days in ships or craft on inland waters or off the coast of Vietnam.
• One or more days on the posted strength of a unit or formation on land.
• One operational sortie over Vietnam or Vietnamese water by aircrew on the posted strength of a unit.
• Official visits either continuous or aggregate of 30 days.
• One day or more by members of accredited philanthropic organisations attached to Australian forces in an official capacity for full-time duty. between 29 May 1964 and 27 January 1973.

Booth3 2018 02 08


2. The Republic of Vietnam Medal.

Australia

The Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal was awarded to Australian military personnel for service in South Vietnam during the period 31 July 1962 to 28 March 1973. The requirements for the award are: at least 181 days service, either continuous or aggregated, unless killed on active service (KIA); or wounded in action (includes psychological injury)[9] and evacuated (medically evacuated other than being wounded does not meet requirement for medal); or captured and later released or escaped.

Booth blames the Department of Defence for “the error”. He knows that it is wrong, but he fraudulently had the medals court mounted, and wears them on official occasions illegally. If you believe his suspect story that the medals were sent to him "in error". why didn't he just return them.

ANZMI asked Booth if he did actually serve in Vietnam, what period he served, what ship or ships he was a crew member of, and what medals was he actually entitled to? He stated that he was unable to recall unless he looked through his records, that were in a garage somewhere in Australia. After two further requests, Booth did not give any specific details of his Vietnam service, other than to respond "that there are other ships I served on in the operational area."

The below Vietnam War Service Certificate issued, purportedly by the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), indicates that Booth served in Vietnam Waters for 413 days. It lists the following ships that Booth allegedly served on in Vietnam during the qualifying period 1962 to 1973.


1. HMAS Sydney
2. HMAS Parramatta.
3. HMAS Yarra
4. HMAS Hobart
5. CINPAC. (Commander in Chief Pacific)

Booth4AA 2018 02 08 2


The certificate is false. It is a forgery. Only one person could benefit from this forged document. The person who submitted it to the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch.

This certificate was with other documentation submitted to the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch, by Booth, when Booth applied to transfer his membership from Hornsby RSL Sub Branch, Sydney, in November, 2016.  We know that the information that appears on this certificate is false. His name does not appear on any of the published lists of crew members, for the three, 6 month deployments to Vietnam by Hobart.

We have signed statements from members of the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch and Hornsby RSL Sub Branch, detailing that Booth claims that he was on Hobart when it was damaged by 3 missiles from a U.S.A.F aircraft.

This incident occurred on the 17 June, 1968. Two crew members were killed and others injured. Extensive damage was sustained by Hobart and we can all be thankful that there was no greater loss of life to our young men.

Booth, according to his official Navy Record, was posted on Parramatta at that time, and was nowhere near Vietnam as he has claimed. Parramatta was in Singapore Harbour undergoing lengthy repairs, when Booth deceitfully claims he was part of Hobart's crew.

Booth4B


Strangely, the only current Vietnam War Service Certificate for Booth on the DVA Website appears below. There is no of ships that Booth served on or dates served.

Vietnam War Service

Veteran Details
Name BOOTH, Ian Montgomery
Service Royal Australian Navy
Service Number O2407
Rank Sub-Lieutenant
Honours None for display


Something is amiss.

ANZMI then received another communication from Booth, where he stated that he served on the following ships on operational service in Vietnam.-;

Might I suggest that you check my service in the following ships -

HMAS Sydney 1967, 1968
HMAS Parramatta 1968
HMAS Yarra 1969
USS Brinkley Bass 1970
HMAS Sydney 1970 -1971

He does not mention Hobart on this occasion. He also knows that he has been caught out in regards to serving 181 days on Hobart, when it was stationed on the Gun Line, to qualify for the VM and the VCM. He has now substituted Hobart with the USS Brinkley Bass, a United States Navy Destroyer, that served on and off in Vietnam waters for short periods in 1970. According to our research, Booth was never attached to that ship for any period of time. There are no records of him serving on that ship.

He also claims Vietnam service on HMAS Yarra 1969. Yarra did not have qualifying operational service in Vietnam in 1969. It escorted the Aircraft Carrier HMAS Sydney to Vung Tau, Vietnam in the last week of February, 1970. (Ships Record of Proceedings)

We know that Booth did not spend 413 days in the qualifying area of Vietnam, as indicated on his false certificate. He is not entitled to wear the Vietnam medal or the Vietnam Campaign Medal. (181 days or more) His Certificate of Vietnam Service, allegedly issued by the Department of Veterans Affairs is a lie, and Booth knows it.

His National Archives Australia Naval records, indicate that he was posted to the Sydney when it travelled to Vung Tau Harbour, Vietnam, on the 27 December, 1967. The ship arrived at 0700 hours that date and left at 1450hrs. A total of about 8 hours. However, qualifying time is accredited from the time the ship left the last Australian Port of Fremantle until its return to Australia 14 days later. His records disclose that he was also a crew member of Sydney when it sailed to Vietnam in late January, 1968 and spent 7 hours in Vung Tau Harbour on the 3 February, 1968.

Also Booths Naval Record indicates that he was on Parramatta between March and July, 1968. On 9 April, 1968. Parramatta visited Vung Tau Harbour for 9 hours escorting Sydney.

It appears then, that Booth deployed on Sydney in December 1967 and February. 1968, to Vung Tau Harbour and then on Parramatta in April, 1968. That being the case, he is entitled to wear the AASM, and the VLSM for those three trips and accumulated 24 hours in the port of Vung Tau..

He is not entitled to wear the Vietnam medal or the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal.

Booth6jpg 2018 02 08 2


The above medal that he wears between the ADM and the VCM is the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. Booth has added the "Combat V" clasp to the medal that he wears. The medal is awarded for -;

The (U.S) Navy and Marine Corps Commendation medal may be awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the Navy or Marine Corps (including foreign military personnel), distinguishes himself/herself by heroic or meritorious achievement or service. To merit this award, the acts or services must be accomplished or performed in a manner above that normally expected and sufficient to distinguish the individual above those performing similar services as set forth in the following -;

For Meritorious Achievement. Outstanding and worthy of special recognition,

For Meritorious Service. Outstanding and worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal or Air Medal when combat is involved or the Meritorious Service Medal or Air Medal when combat is not involved.

For Acts of Heroism. Worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal when combat is involved or the Navy and Marine Corps Medal when combat is not involved.

For Acts of Heroism

Surname: Booth
Christian Names: Ian/Iain Mongomory
Country: Philippines
State or Province: Angeles City
City or Town: Angeles city
Service #: 02407
Service: Royal Australian Navy
Branch: Seaman
Commencement of service: 06 Mar 67
Completion of service: Jun 71
Case Notes:

Iain Booth was born on the 25 April, 1949. In 1967, he enlisted in the Royal Australian Navy as a Cadet Midshipman. In the following years he progressed to Sub Lieutenant. He is a Medals Cheat and a false pretender. Booth wears seven medals. He is entitled to wear four.

Booth1jpg 2018 02 08

Booth1Ajpgjpg 2018 02 08

In the above 2017 Remembrance Day photograph, taken at Angeles City, near Manilla, Phillipines, Booth is wearing the following medals.

1. The Australian Active Serve Medal - (AASM) Entitled.2. Vietnam Medal. (VM) Not entitled
3. Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal. – (VLSM) Entitled.
4. Australian Service Medal. (ASM) Entitled
5. Australian Defence Medal. (ADM)Entitled.
6. U.S Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, with a "Combat V clasp. Not entitled.
7. Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. (RVCM) Not entitled.

Concerns were raised by individuals in Australia and the Phillippines, regarding Australian military medals worn by Booth. He also falsely claimed service on HMAS Hobart, a Royal Australian Navy Destroyer, in June, 1968. ANZMI are in possession of signed statements of fact in regards to lies told by Booth regarding Hobart service, at the time he claims. .

It appears that the medals he wears are not consistent with his actual RAN service. In particular, the VM and the VLSM cannot be worn together. You are issued with one or the other. He has been warned in writing several times by RSL Sub Branch Executives about not conforming with medals protocols and wearing medals he is not entitled to. Booth also made other comments to others about his alleged RAN service that are false.

ANZMI then researched the public records, regarding the Royal Australian Navy career of Ian Booth, as he was known then, and arrived at the same conclusion. He has since changed his first name to "Iain."

ANZMI then communicated with Mr Iain Booth and asked him for a summary of his Naval service and the medals that he wears. His response, inter alia, is below -;

I readily concede that there has been an error in my medal issue and that the VLSM cannot be issued with the Vietnam Medal, but the fact that my medals were all issued and named to me is not my error and I therefore feel that I am entitled to wear them. It would be less than prudent to knowingly wear medals that were supposedly not issued together (unless in error) as this would doubtlessly bring into question my entitlement.

Following that idiotic statement, we believe that Booth not only lives in another country, he lives on another planet.

We should all be glad that the Department of Defence did not send him a Victoria Cross in “error”. With Booth’s view on medals protocol, he would have had that medal court mounted and worn as well, claiming that he is entitled to wear it, as "it was not his error!"

The three medals that Booth and ANZMI know that he is not entitled to wear, are the Vietnam Medal (VM), the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. (RVCM) and the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, with clasp.

1. The Vietnam Medal.


Booth2 2018 02 08



Qualification requirement
Australia

Qualifying service for the Vietnam Medal includes:
• 28 days in ships or craft on inland waters or off the coast of Vietnam.
• One or more days on the posted strength of a unit or formation on land.
• One operational sortie over Vietnam or Vietnamese water by aircrew on the posted strength of a unit.
• Official visits either continuous or aggregate of 30 days.
• One day or more by members of accredited philanthropic organisations attached to Australian forces in an official capacity for full-time duty. between 29 May 1964 and 27 January 1973.


Booth3 2018 02 08


2. The Republic of Vietnam Medal.

Australia

The Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal was awarded to Australian military personnel for service in South Vietnam during the period 31 July 1962 to 28 March 1973. The requirements for the award are: at least 181 days service, either continuous or aggregated, unless killed on active service (KIA); or wounded in action (includes psychological injury)[9] and evacuated (medically evacuated other than being wounded does not meet requirement for medal); or captured and later released or escaped.

Booth blames the Department of Defence for “the error”. He knows that it is wrong, but he fraudulently had the medals court mounted, and wears them on official occasions illegally. If you believe his suspect story that the medals were sent to him "in error". why didn't he just return them.

ANZMI asked Booth if he did actually serve in Vietnam, what period he served, what ship or ships he was a crew member of, and what medals was he actually entitled to? He stated that he was unable to recall unless he looked through his records, that were in a garage somewhere in Australia. After two further requests, Booth did not give any specific details of his Vietnam service, other than to respond "that there are other ships I served on in the operational area."


The below Vietnam War Service Certificate issued, purportedly by the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), indicates that Booth served in Vietnam Waters for 413 days. It lists the following ships that Booth allegedly served on in Vietnam during the qualifying period 1962 to 1973..
1. HMAS Sydney
2. HMAS Parramatta.
3. HMAS Yarra
4. HMAS Hobart
5. CINPAC. (Commander in Chief Pacific)


Booth4AA 2018 02 08 2


The certificate is false. It is a forgery. Only one person could benefit from this forged document. The person who submitted it to the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch.

This certificate was with other documentation submitted to the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch, by Booth, when Booth applied to transfer his membership from Hornsby RSL Sub Branch, Sydney, in November, 2016.. We know that the information that appears on this certificate is false. His name does not appear on any of the published lists of crew members, for the three, 6 month deployments to Vietnam by Hobart.

We have signed statements from members of the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch and Hornsby RSL Sub Branch, detailing that Booth claims that he was on Hobart when it was damaged by 3 missiles from a U.S.A.F aircraft.

This incident occurred on the 17 June, 1968. Two crew members were killed and others injured. Extensive damage was sustained by Hobart and we can all be thankful that there was no greater loss of life to our young men.

Booth, according to his official Navy Record, was posted on Parramatta at that time, and was nowhere near Vietnam as he has claimed. Parramatta was in Singapore Harbour undergoing lengthy repairs, when Booth deceitfully claims he was part of Hobart's crew.


Booth4B


Strangely, the only current Vietnam War Service Certificate for Booth on the DVA Website appears below. There is no mention of ships that Booth served on or dates served.

Vietnam War Service

Veteran Details
Name BOOTH, Ian Montgomery
Service Royal Australian Navy
Service Number O2407
Rank Sub-Lieutenant
Honours None for display


Something is amiss.

ANZMI then received another communication from Booth, where he stated that he served on the following ships on operational service in Vietnam.
-;

Might I suggest that you check my service in the following ships -

HMAS Sydney 1967, 1968
HMAS Parramatta 1968
HMAS Yarra 1969
USS Brinkley Bass 1970
HMAS Sydney 1970 -1971


He does not mention Hobart on this occasion. He also knows that he has been caught out in regards to serving 181 days on Hobart, when it was stationed on the Gun Line, to qualify for the VM and the VCM. He has now substituted Hobart with the USS Brinkley Bass, a United States Navy Destroyer, that served on and off in Vietnam waters for short periods in 1970. According to our research, Booth was never attached to that ship for any period of time. There are no records of him serving on that ship.

He also claims Vietnam service on HMAS Yarra 1969. Yarra did not have qualifying operational service in Vietnam in 1969. It escorted the Aircraft Carrier HMAS Sydney to Vung Tau, Vietnam in the last week of February, 1970. (Ships Record of Proceedings)

We know that Booth did not spend 413 days in the qualifying area of Vietnam, as indicated on his false certificate. He is not entitled to wear the Vietnam medal or the Vietnam Campaign Medal. (181 days or more) His Certificate of Vietnam Service, allegedly issued by the Department of Veterans Affairs is a lie, and Booth knows it.

His National Archives Australia Naval records, indicate that he was posted to the Sydney when it travelled to Vung Tau Harbour, Vietnam, on the 27 December, 1967. The ship arrived at 0700 hours that date and left at 1450hrs. A total of about 8 hours. However, qualifying time is accredited from the time the ship left the last Australian Port of Fremantle until its return to Australia 14 days later. His records disclose that he was also a crew member of Sydney when it sailed to Vietnam in late January, 1968 and spent 7 hours in Vung Tau Harbour on the 3 February, 1968.

Also Booths Naval Record indicates that he was on Parramatta between March and July, 1968. On 9 April, 1968. Parramatta visited Vung Tau Harbour for 9 hours escorting Sydney.

It appears then, that Booth deployed on Sydney in December 1967 and February. 1968, to Vung Tau Harbour and then on Parramatta in April, 1968. That being the case, he is entitled to wear the AASM, and the VLSM for those three trips and accumulated 24 hours in the port of Vung Tau..

He is not entitled to wear the Vietnam medal or the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal.


Booth6jpg 2018 02 08 2


The above medal that he wears between the ADM and the VCM is the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. Booth has added the "Combat V" clasp to the medal that he wears. The medal is awarded for -;

The (U.S) Navy and Marine Corps Commendation medal may be awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the Navy or Marine Corps (including foreign military personnel), distinguishes himself/herself by heroic or meritorious achievement or service. To merit this award, the acts or services must be accomplished or performed in a manner above that normally expected and sufficient to distinguish the individual above those performing similar services as set forth in the following -;

For Meritorious Achievement. Outstanding and worthy of special recognition,

For Meritorious Service. Outstanding and worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal or Air Medal when combat is involved or the Meritorious Service Medal or Air Medal when combat is not involved.

For Acts of Heroism. Worthy of special recognition, but not to the degree required for the Bronze Star Medal when combat is involved or the Navy and Marine Corps Medal when combat is not involved.

No records exist of Booth having been awarded the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. Sadly, he has purchased this medal and awarded to himself..

ANZMI sent Booth an email inquiring about his claim to the United States Navy and Marine Corps Commendation medal with the Combat V clasp. His response was that he was never awarded a Commendation Medal.

From Booth February 2018 -

"I'm a little confused regarding your statement about my being awarded a Commendation Medal. I have never been awarded one. Perhaps you can enlighten me as to the origin of this"..

We certainly agree with Booth, that "he has never been awarded the medal and clasp" in question. Memory failure perhaps? We think not.

We also have statements from RSL members that Booth has claimed that he was a crew member of the RAN Submarine HMAS Onslow. We know that he underwent Submarine Training, but he was never posted as a crew member to Onslow or any other RAN Submarine. Again, no records exist regarding this claim.


Booth7 2018 02 08 2


For his accumulated 24 hours in Vung Tau Harbour, Vietnam, Booth wears 5 medals. He is entitled to 2. The Australian Active Service Medal (AASM) and the Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal (VLSM) He is also entitled to the Australian Service Medal (ASM) with clasp (FESR) for Far East Strategic Reserve Duty and the Australian Defence Medal. (ADM)

By his own admission, Booth is a Medal Cheat and a False Pretender. His membership for the Angeles City RSL Sub Branch should be cancelled. He also owes them an explanation and an apology. He is a fraud.

Surname: Boreham
Christian Names: Rick
Country: New Zealand
State or Province: North Island
City or Town: Auckland
Service: Army Reserve/RAAF
Branch: Signals
Commencement of service: Oct 1988
Completion of service: Nov 1995
Case Notes:

Rick Boreham - The gentleman wannabe.

 

Rick Boreham is a wannabe who decided to add a bit of “excitement” to his military history. He is however a gentleman wannabe, who when confronted fell on his sword by confessing his malfeasance.

 

Notice Boreham is wearing an Australian Service Medal (ASM) which has a SE Asia Clasp as well as the Australian Defence Medal. He has no entitlement to the ASM. 

Boreham started his career with a one year stint, from October 1989 to November 1990, in an Army Reserve, Royal Australian Corps of  Signals (RA Sigs) unit, hence the badge on his beret.  After discharge from the Army at “His own request”. He joined the RAAF and worked as an Assistant Cook until 1995.

Here is an “edited” written explanation and apology penned by Boreham.

“Thank you for allowing me a couple of days to get back to you. I appreciate the fact that you have contacted me in the courteous manner that you did.

I'm very sorry to say that unfortunately, your enquiries will not bring up anything positive about me.

My military career was an unmitigated disaster -  edited - leaving the RAAF in 1995 as an LAC Cooks Assistant (service number A63915).

paragraph edited

Edited - , I embellished and lied about my military service and took to wearing an award - the Australian Service Medal with SE Asia clasp - that I was not entitled to wear. I also told lies about the causes for my depression and PTSD claiming it to be from my service not from some harmful things that occurred –edited. It was easier for me to lie than to admit the painful truth. I am now taking medication for these conditions and will be seeking further treatment.

I regret my actions in ways that I struggle to find the words for. I come from a family with a long military history and I now have to live with the fact that not only have I bought shame upon myself, but also on the memory of those members of my family who came before me.

I apologise unreservedly for any offence that I have caused to genuine veterans and ask that you show me some mercy as I try to re-build my life and my career.

Paragraph edited

Once again, I apologise for the stupidity of my actions and for the offence caused and understand that as a former member of the ADF, I should have known better.

section edited

Thank you again for the courtesy of your approach.

Rick Boreham"

 

Boreham also penned a resume for himself detailing his RAAF career. The duties are somewhat different from that expected of a Leading Aircraftsman, Assistant Cook who would normally be peeling spuds.  See below:

 

“Time of service: October 1988 – November 1995 (7 years 2 months)

Duties undertaken during service:

•Security Operations providing protection to aircraft, personnel and infrastructure

•Manning of Observation Posts (OPs), Listening Posts (LPs) and standing patrols to detect and interdict enemy movement

•Quick Reaction Force (QRF) duties in response to identified threats

•Manning of crew served weapons

•Foot and vehicle patrolling

•Construction of field defences and obstacles such as weapon pits and bunkers, fences and vehicle check points (VCPs)

•Search and clearance operations

•Security for special events

•Specialised secure military communications

•Electronic data processing

•Manning mobile communications detachments

•Laying and maintenance of communications cables”

 

Boreham has exaggerated his Defence Service and worn a medal he did not earn, therefore he has earned a place on our web site. It is also noted that he exhibits courage by confessing and apologizing. Most of the criminals and medals cheats who appear here, when caught, immediately, deny, feign illness, threaten physical retribution or threaten devastating legal action.

Boreham did none of that and although we have named and shamed him we wish him well.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from private citizens are supported by statements of fact and statutory declarations.

Powered by SobiPro