Moore

Date of Entry: 06/08/2017
Surname: Moore
Christian Names: Richard
Country: Australia
State or Province: Western Australia
City or Town: Esperance
Service #: Unknown
Service: Unknown
Branch: Unknown
Commencement of service: Unknown
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

 

 

Senior Sergeant Richard Moore is a member of the Western Australia Police and the OIC of Esperance Police Station since 2014. He has an important position of trust in the community of Esperance, and must at all times act in a diligent and ethical manner in execution of his duty as a sworn officer of the law.

 

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The above photograph was taken at the 2016 Esperance ANZAC Day service. It is one of many taken at various commemorations where Moore has sported his medals or medal ribbons.

Here he can be seen wearing the following:

  1. National Police Service Medal (NPSM).
  2. National Medal.
  3. Australian Defence Medal (ADM).
  4. WA Police Diligent and Ethical Service Medal.
  5. Citizens Military Force Commemorative (Junk medal).
  6. Regular Forces Commemorative (Junk Medal).

 

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The National Police Service Medal (NPSM) is a special service award within the Australian honours system to provide "recognition for the unique contribution and significant commitment of those persons who have given ethical and diligent service as a sworn member of an Australian police service".

The NPSM is awarded for "15 years 'ethical and diligent service' on or after 14 February 1975, or for a lesser period if that service was terminated due to the member's death, or to an impairment related to the discharge of their duties as a Constable of Police".

WUMoore 3 2017 05 12

 

The West Australia Police Diligent and Ethical Service Medal is awarded to serving, and former serving sworn members, who have completed ten years of diligent and ethical service.

This medal is a State award and Federal protocol dictates that they are to be worn on the right breast. The WA Police Commissioner has provided written (albeit incorrect) approval for members to wear both State and Federal medals on the left breast. In this regard, Richard can justifiably claim the defence that he was just following orders!

WUMoore 4 2017 05 12                                            WUMoore 5 2017 05 12

 

It is the last two medals that cause offence to current and former Defence members. These so-called ‘medals’ are nothing more than junk, usually purchased by those wishing to build up not only their medal rack, but their ego as well.

In response to enquiries to West Australia Police (WAPOL), regarding the incorrect wearing of service medals, the following was received from the Ethical Standards Branch:

Mr XXXXXX

Thank you for your email received by WA Police Media & Public Affairs on Wednesday, 22 March 2017.  The matter has since been forwarded to WA Police Professional Standards and brought to my attention.

As a result of the concerns you expressed about Senior Sergeant Richard Moore’s wearing the Citizens Military Force Commemorative Medal and Regular Forces Commemorative Medal I have made inquiries with both, WA Police Honours & Awards and Senior Sergeant Moore.  I have established as these particular medals are from an external body permission must be obtained for them to be worn with WA Police Uniform.  Senior Sergeant Moore states he was not aware of this requirement and advised me he will immediately desist wearing the medals and ribbon bar until he receives the necessary authority to wear them.   I am informed once WA Police Honours and Awards receives his request to wear these medals they will base their decision upon relevant legislation and WA Police Policies.    

In summary I am satisfied Senior Sergeant Moore’s actions in wearing of the medals was not meant to offend and note he has been quick to remedy the situation at his own direction, once the oversight was brought to his attention.  Consequently determination as to his entitlement to wear these medals in the future will rest with WA Police Honours & Awards and I will not be taking further action on the matter from the perspective of Professional Standards.

Once again I appreciate you bringing this matter to the attention of WA Police and hope my response has addressed your concerns.  Should you be dissatisfied with this course of action, you can report misconduct to the Corruption and Crime Commission (CCC), who have legislative oversight over WA Police misconduct matters.  The CCC will assess your report and may conduct a review of the matter at their discretion.

 

Regards

 

Kim Johnson  | Senior Sergeant 7164 | Ethical Standards Divsion| Level 10, 256 Adelaide Terrace Perth  WA  6000 | Western Australia Police

A look at the electronic media will show a number of WAPOL members, right up to the rank of Commissioner, wearing commemorative medals and State medals mixed with those awarded by the Commonwealth. Obviously they have been ill-advised by their own Honours and Awards section.

May we provide the following advice to WAPOL Honours and Awards, as sourced from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, concerning the wearing of “Tin” medals:

http://www.dpmc.gov.au/resource-centre/government/wearing-awards

Ex-service organisations sometimes commission their own unofficial medals to mark participation in particular military campaigns, periods of service or types of service that have not been recognised through the Australian honours system. Awards made by foreign governments which have not been approved by the Governor-General for acceptance and wear are also "unofficial". There are no restrictions to wearing such medals in appropriate private settings, such as a meeting of the relevant ex-service association, or a reception hosted by the relevant foreign government. Ideally, unofficial medals should not be worn at public ceremonial and commemorative events, but if they are worn as the occasion requests, the convention is that they are worn on the right breast.

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The above photograph was taken at the 2017 Esperance ANZAC Day ceremony, where Moore had a key role in the service.

Again, Moore is wearing the same medals, although this time their order has been adjusted for whatever reason.

This leaves some unanswered questions, such as, has Moore chosen to ignore the advice of Professional Standards, or has, once again, the West Australian Police Force decided it is a law unto itself when it comes to medal protocol?

Until WAPOL changes official policy, it will only further damage the expectations that veterans have regarding the behaviour of police members.

Senior Sergeant Richard Moore, you have been awarded both State and Federal medals recognising your Police service, particularly in the areas of diligence and ethical behaviour.

By wearing worthless medals, you have deceived the community you serve in to believing you are a decorated Veteran. Your actions are far from ethical and show your lack of respect towards your fellow police officers and the veteran community in general.

You now have a record, complete with mugshot, on the ANZMI site for all to see.

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