Latest Cases

Latest Cases

Surname: Weinhofen
Christian Names: Rodney Edward
Country: Australia
State or Province: Western Australia
City or Town: South Lake, Perth
Service #: R95838
Service: Royal Australian avy
Branch: Supply and Secretariat (Cook)
Case Notes:

 

At ANZMI we do not hunt for those who are valour thiefs. All are reported to us by concerned veterans, ex servicemen and women, and the general public. We receive the complaint, investigate the allegations, and if proven, publish the results of our investigation. Readers can judge the behaviour of the person exposed based on the evidence published.

We have received reports that we "pick on" RAN people, we do not, we only process those who are reported to us.

Here is ex Navy veteran, Rodney Edward Weinhofen of Perth WA.

Weinhofen1

 


Edwards wears five medals they are:

Australian Active Service Medal (AASM)
Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal (VLSM)
Australian Defence Medal (ADM)
Logistic and Support Force Medal - Self purchased "Tin" Medal
HMAS Sydney Medal - Self purchased "Tin" Medal


Apart from the Australian Defence Medal, the other four medals are for service in Vietnam. In fact, he had two visits to Vietnam and spent a total of eleven hours anchored in Vung Tau harbour for the two visits. He was a Cook aboard HMAS Sydney during the two visits.

Here are excerpts from ships reports detailing his visit:

From 0600hrs until 1200 hours on the 28 November 1969

Weinhofen2

Weinhofen3
 
Weinhofen4


From 0638 hrs until 1120 hours on 26 Feb 1670

Weinhofen5

 

Weinhofen6

For eleven hours in safe anchorage in Vung Tau Harbour, Weinhofen wears four medals, two were issued to him and two are self purchased non authorised "Tin".

There is other evidence to judge Weinhofen as an exaggerator. Here is what he posted on social media.

Weinhofen7

 

All ranks who participated in the Vietnam war, whether they were in combat, or in support roles, such as Weinhofen, must be proud of their service. Those in combat did the hard yards, and those in support , made sure that combat elements could effectively fight.

Being a Cook on an Australian warship, in a non combat support role, does not give Weinhofen the right to wear extra medals and make claims to have "fought in a war".

Those who exaggerate or lie about their service, or wear medals they did not earn, will eventually be welcomed aboard
the good ship ANZMI, which travels to every corner of the world to exhibit those who are on board.

Surname: May
Christian Names: Alison
Country: Australia
State or Province: South Australia
City or Town: Kingswood
Service: NIL
Case Notes:

 

When you are employed as a civilian by the Australian Government in the Defence Department, wearing an un-awarded military medal on ANZAC day is going to attract a great deal of attention. In particular, from Australian Defence Force personnel, (ADF) who have actually been deployed on active service duty in various theatres of war.

ADF personnel have been there and they have done the hard yards. They find it hard to condone medal cheats who wear medals on important ceremonial occasions that have not been earned. In this particular case, ANZAC Day.

Alison May is currently employed with the Department of Defence. ANZMI will not disclose where she currently works or what position she holds.

ANZMI will disclose though, that in her current senior position, she should have more sense.

Alison May is a medal cheat. It is as simple as that. She has never been a sworn member of the Australian Defence Force, Army, Navy or Air Force.

 

MayAlison1

 

MayAlison1A


In the above photographs, at a recent ANZAC Day ceremony, May is wearing the following -;

1. The Australian Operational Service Medal - Civilian. (OSM) Possibly entitled.

2. The Timor Leste Solidarity Medal. (TLSM) Not entitled..

Above the medals she wears a CDF Defence Force Commendation badge. Entitlement unknown. Below the medals she wears an Australian Operational Service badge.

MayAlison1B

The Operational Service Medal-Civilian is awarded to civilian persons who meet the criteria of serving 30 days continuous or accrued days in East Timor between the dates stipulated. ANZMI has been informed that May served as a civilian in East Timor in 2009 and is possibly entitled to this award.

The Timor Leste Solidarity medal (below) is a foreign award proclaimed by the East Timor Government. It is only awarded to members of the Australian Defence Force and other eligible foreign Defence Force personnel, who have completed a continuous or accrued period of 180 days. This does not include civilians. Alison May’s name does not appear on the List of Recipients for this award and she is not entitled to wear it.

MayAlison2

The criteria for the medal are indicated below.

Criteria
Personnel may be awarded the medal if they meet personnel and time qualifications. Personnel eligible are military or police personnel who have served on a mandated mission assisting with peace and stability operations. Military or Police personnel may also be eligible if they were posted to a recognised bilateral support mission to East Timor.

Personnel must have served a minimum of 180 continuous or accrued days of service in East Timor from 1 May 2006. Personnel may also be nominated who served a minimum of 120 days from 1 May 2006, or who served with a start date in May or June 2006 for a period at least 90 days. The President of East Timor may also consider extraordinary circumstances for those who are outside of mandated time periods. Applications for extraordinary cases are approved and submitted through national missions to be considered and approved by the president. Notification of approved cases will be returned in writing.

May was contacted and invited to respond to information received from concerned veterans that she was wearing an un-awarded Timor Leste Solidarity medal.

Her response was -;

Hi
I have a Timor Leste OSM which was given to me by an ex-partner who had PTSD and said he didn’t want it any more. I told him to keep it, but when he was going to throw it in the bin I agreed to put it in the cupboard. I have no recollection of ever wearing it because it is associated with an unpleasant and destructive relationship. If at some point I did, I can only guess that it was absent minded when grabbing my other medals and pins which I keep all together. There could have been one ANZAC Day in 2014 or 2015 where I wore it with the intention of representing him, because I recall him being in the psych ward at the Repatriation hospital and visiting him after the morning service. However, I am only guessing as I obviously had a lot of other things on my mind at that time.

I request copies of whatever photo prompted your query.

You or any other appropriate agency is welcome to the medal as it holds no value to me.

The interesting part of this response is that Defence Force personnel have to apply in writing to have the Timor Leste Solidarity Medal awarded to them. It is incongruous that someone would apply for the medal, have the application accepted, be awarded the medal, and then want to throw the medal in the bin, as claimed by Alison May.

That part of May’s response does not make sense. In fairness, May requested and was then forwarded a photograph of herself wearing the medals (above). She was invited to make further comment about her entitlement to the Timor Leste Medal, the OSM and the badges that appear both above and below the medals. She responded -;

As I previously said, the Solidarity medal belonged to an ex-partner of mine –(Name deleted by ANZMI). You will find that he is standing next to me in the original versions of the photos. I recall on one ANZAC day him asking me to wear it, but did not recall whether I agreed to his request. He was (and probably still is) an extremely unstable and chaotic person, with severe addiction issues so I generally agreed to whatever would keep him calm.

It was 5-6 years ago, but I seem to remember him mentioning something about accidentally having received two of them and we had a conversation about why he should return one. If you have any issues with this I suggest you take it up with him. It is evident that he is the one that has provided you the zoomed in images, in which case you can be certain that your organisation and your research services are being co-opted as part of a personal vendetta, which I have been advised by SA police is very close to harassment.
The medals and commendations that I have earned during my 20 year career in Defence for my service in Timor and the Middle East are recorded on PMKeys for appropriate authorities to view as required. Therefore I have no need or desire to pretend to have earned ADF medals.

I will await confirmation that you have no further queries in relation to this.

ANZMI then made further inquiries and ascertained that the recipient was only awarded the original medal Timor Leste Solidarity. He was not issued two medals as suggested by Alison May. Also, he was not the person who provided the information about May to ANZMI.

Alison May has provided ANZMI with two versions of events as to why she wore an un-entitled medal on Anzac Day. Of significance is her first response -;

There could have been one ANZAC Day in 2014 or 2015 where I wore it with the intention of representing him, because I recall him being in the psych ward at the Repatriation hospital and visiting him after the morning service.

Second response -;

As I previously said, the Solidarity medal belonged to an ex-partner of mine –(Name deleted by ANZMI). You will find that he is standing next to me in the original versions of the photos. I recall on one ANZAC day him asking me to wear it, but did not recall whether I agreed to his request.

The first version claims her ex-partner is in the Repatriation Hospital, the second version, he is standing next to her.

The versions also differ in that the first email response she claims, -; “I can only guess that it was absent minded when grabbing my other medals and pins”

And, the second response -;
“I recall on one ANZAC day him asking me to wear it, but did not recall whether I agreed to his request”.

Our role at ANZMI is to present the facts to the public. We will leave it to our readers to make their own judgements about the credibility of Ms Alison May and her replica Timor Leste Solidarity Medal. .

Surname: Wallace
Christian Names: Erin
Country: Australia
State or Province: Victoria
City or Town: Cranbourne
Service #: Nil
Service: Claims Army
Branch: Claims Nursing Corps. RAANC
Commencement of service: Nil
Completion of service: Nil
Case Notes:

 

At ANZMI, it gives us pleasure to expose long term military imposters, who have gained considerable kudos and public recognition, for many years from close friends, workmates, family and the media. Their deceit has also seen advancement to higher work positions above others, who are generally more deserving, and who have greater credibility and honesty.

When your world comes crashing down after years of being a military fraud and false pretender, you only have yourself to blame.

Stealing the honour of those military personnel who served and those who made the ultimate sacrifice is a low act. To steal the honour of Australian Army Nurses, many of whom returned with mental health issues, is also a low act.

 

Erin Wallace is a Military Fraud, an Honour Thief and a Medal Cheat. You can also throw in liar.

For many years her deceitful conduct has convinced those close to her that she is a bemedalled Vietnam War Veteran, who served in the Australian Army as a Nurse.

Wallace is 69 years of age. She is currently the Gippsland Regional Manager for St John Ambulance, and resides in Cranbourne, Melbourne, Victoria. She has held this position for 5 years.

Over recent years, her medal rack has grown as displayed below.

WallaceErin1

Photograph above taken in 2016, she wears the Vietnam Medal and the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. Notice she is missing the Australian Active Service Medal (AASM Proclaimed in December 1997) and the Australian Defence Medal. (ADM Proclaimed 20 March, 2006.)

 

WallaceErin1AB


More recent photograph since 2016. She now wears the AASM as well as the ADM with the original two medals.

Only 43 Australian Army Nursing Sisters served in South Vietnam between 1967 to 1971. The youngest Nursing Sister was 22 and the eldest was 45 years of age. Their ranks ranged from Lieutenants to Majors. They had a tough job.

The last Australian Army Nurses to leave South Vietnam did so in November, 1971 when the Australian Field Hospital closed. The last Australian troops, 4 RAR, left on the 7 November, 1971.

Nursing Sisters did not complete normal Officer Training at that time. Many were "Direct Entry" from being a qualified practicing civilian Nursing sister to be an Army Commissioned Officer. After being commissioned, they completed an orientation course at School of Army Health, Healsville Victoria, and would have gained experience in an Army hospital in Australia or Concord Repatriation Hospital, Sydney, before deployment to South Vietnam.

For Wallace to have served at the youngest age of 22 years as a qualified Sister and Lieutenant, in the last year of Australia’s involvement ( ie.1971), she would have to now attained the age of 71 years plus. (at 2021) As she is 69 years of age, her time line is out at least two years at the very minimum.

 

WallaceErin3


WallaceErin3A

 

WallaceErin3B

The above screenshots are from a St John Facebook video Wallace made to publicise and self promote her alleged Vietnam service and other achievements. She claims that she was an Army Nurse who returned from Vietnam to the Darwin Docks, where she was met and was impressed by St John Ambulance people, who gave her cups of tea and vegemite sandwiches.

That statement is also a lie. No Australian Army Nurses returned home by ship.

You will notice that she now wears the following medals -;

www.facebook.com/stjohnvic/videos/2124384304358108

1.The Officer of the Order of St John Medal. Top row.
2.Australian Active Service Medal. (AASM) Not entitled. Top row.
3.Vietnam Medal. Not entitled. bottom row.
4.Australian Defence Medal. (ADM) Not entitled. bottom row.
5. The Service Medal of the Order of St John bottom row.
6.Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. (RVCM) 180 days in country. Not entitled. bottom row.

Wallace’s name does not appear on the DVA Vietnam Nominal Roll as having served in South Vietnam in the Australian Army. Also taking into account maiden names, only two persons with first names Erin served in the Australian Army in South Vietnam. She is not one of them. Her name also does not appear on the List of Australian Army Nurses that served in South Vietnam between 1967 and 1971.

Wallace was contacted by email at St John Ambulance, Victoria and given an opportunity to respond to information received that she is not entitled to wear the above medals or was not an Army Nurse as she has claimed. She was also requested to provide the following information -;

1. Proof of Australian Defence Force medal entitlement.
2. Her service number, Unit, and rank.
3. Date of commencement of Army service.
4. Date of completion of Army service.
5. Date she deployed to South Vietnam as an Army Sister and Lieutenant.
6. Date she returned to Australia.

She has not responded and we do not expect a reply.

 

Wallace is an Affiliate member of the Dandenong RSL Sub Branch, Victoria, due to a relative being a service person. She is also a Social member of the Leongatha RSL Sub Branch, Victoria.

If she was a returned veteran, Wallace would be a full member of Dandenong RSL Sub Branch and not an Affiliate Member.

Wallace is a high flyer in the Victorian St John Ambulance. She has received many accolades over the years.

St John Victoria was contacted and informed that Wallace was a Military Imposter who has committed offences against the Defence Act 1900.


Section 80A. Falsely representing to be returned soldier, sailor or airman
Section 80B.Improper use of service decorations
Penalty - $3,300 dollars fine or six months imprisonment or both.

 

Former and current Returned Veterans of the Australian and New Zealand Defence Forces will not stand by and observe valour thieves and imposters benefit from fraudulent claims of military service.

The Victorian Police have been notified and hopefully will take action against Wallace for her fraudulent behaviour. It may well be that Wallace has committed further criminal offences of “Obtaining benefit by deception” and “False pretences”, in regards to her behaviour.

St John Ambulance, Victoria would be well advised to check her curriculum vitae to ensure that all her documented claims are truthful and accurate. Particularly, her Vietnam service background as an Army Nursing Sister and Officer.

RSL Victoria should also give Wallace the boot from their organisation.

An update for Ms Erin Wallace will be provided as this matter progresses.

Another St John Ambulance Valour Thief and Medal Cheat offender was Christopher Chant. See below.

anzmi.net/index.php/cheats-thieves/valour-thieves/472-chant

Chant resigned from his Executive position due to the ANZMI investigation. Wallace should do the same or be sacked immediately.

St John Ambulance Australia, is a well respected organisation. It needs well respected personnel to carry out their objectives.

Welcome to ANZMI, Military Imposter, Medal Cheat and Valour Thief, Erin Wallace.

Surname: Whitworth
Christian Names: Richard
Country: Australia
State or Province: Queensland
City or Town: Kumbia
Service: Army
Case Notes:

 

Richard Whitworth is known as a purveyor of pickles at a local "country market", and as a doyen of Christianity at his local church. He is also perceived as a damaged Vietnam Veteran, who is unable to acquire recognition or assistance, from the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), because of the secret nature of his military service.

Whitworth 1

Whitwhorth also marches on commemorative occasions with his "military mates" to give proof of his military heritage.

 

Whitworth 2

Whitworth, as a devoted Christian, often preaches sermons at his local church. As well as slipping stories of his Vietnam escapades into casual conversations, he has also preached a sermon on the subject.

The sermon was recorded, and we hold a copy. It was published here www.kingaroysdachurch.org.au/site/index.php/sermons/2-features in 2016, twelve sermons from the bottom. It runs for 28 minutes and 19 seconds, although by now, perhaps the embarrassed congregation has had it removed?

Whitworth 3


Here are examples of what he said in the sermon.

He was a National Serviceman during the Vietnam war.
Served in Vietnam from 1965 until 1968.
Served with D Company 6 Royal Australian Regiment at the battle of Long Tan Vietnam
He served with Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) in Vietnam.
He and four other SASR soldiers, whilst on patrol, came in contact with the Viet Cong .
Three of the team were killed.
One had his leg blown off.
Whitworth was wounded in the head and still has scars.
He was captured, and "patched up" in a Viet Kong tunnel.
Was kept as a prisoner in a cell of 1.5 cu meters.
After twelve months in captivity, he was rescued by a friendly helicopter.
Forty two years later he was severely affected by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and manages daily life through god and work.
Suffers from survivors guilt.

On other occasions, he has said he is unable to apply for recognition or assistance, from the Department of Veterans Affairs, because of the secret nature of his service. Any person who served in Vietnam, can easily discern Whitworth, as flagrant liar, who audaciously lies without trepidation, in a manner, and in a place, where his actions, are disgusting to church attendees and Australian and New Zealand veterans.

What Whitworth has said about his Vietnam service, are fanciful despicable lies. He is not listed on the Department of Veterans affair (DVA) Vietnam Nominal Roll because he did not serve in Vietnam.

He, was much respected in his community, however, it is now known, that he is nothing more than a liar, who has the audacity to enhance his standing in his community, by stealing the valour of returned veterans.

Usually lies about false service are told in pubs and clubs, it is unusual for a community doyen, to tell bald face lies, to those who trust him, both in and out of church.

Whitworth has broken the 11th and 12th Commandments, which are:

"11th, do not covert thy neighbours military service"
 
"12th, thou shall not get caught"
 
"If you do, ANZMI angels will swoop down, and spread the word of your sins to the whole world"


Perhaps the country folk of Kumbia may forgive Whitworth, as good Christians have a want to do, however, veterans of Australia and New Zealand will not forgive, or forget, hence he will remain in ANZMI custody for eternity, plus ten years.

Lest we forget.

Surname: STEVENS
Christian Names: Edwin
Country: Australia
State or Province: Western Australia
City or Town: Perth
Service: Army
Case Notes:

 

Liars and valour thieves clog up our veterans compensation channels, more so during the 1980s to early 2000s, when disgraceful people were causing embarrassment to Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), with their own, and others false claims. Here are some who were involved:

"China" Hammel. www.anzmi.net/~anzminet/index.php/cheats...r-thieves/218-hammal
Harry Kirkman. anzmi.net/index.php/cheats-thieves/valour-thieves/228-kirkman
Barry Wright. anzmi.net/index.php/cheats-thieves/valour-thieves/258-wright
Joseph Brain. mail.anzmi.net/index.php/cheats-thieves/...ur-thieves/277-brain


The latest valour thief, menace and DVA "clogger" is Edwin Stevens of Perth WA. Since 2007 Stevens has been "trying it on", with DVA, Department of Defence (DoD), and the Special Air Service Regiment (SASR).

Unfortunately we have no photograph of Stevens, perhaps we may get lucky and receive one from him, or an interested party.

The crux of the matter, is that Stevens is seeking a pension for Post Traumatic Stress disorder, that he claims was caused by service in the Vietnam war in 1970, on a secret "black ops" quick deployment to Laos.

The exposure is long in detail, but it is necessary to provide a full picture of Stevens’ deceit and his motives to defraud the Department of Veterans Affairs by illegal means.

All is detailed in an Administrative Appeals Tribunal dated 21 December 2020. To wit:

"1 Mr Stevens enlisted with the Australian Army in 1969 when he was 18 years of age. He was posted to the Special Air Service Regiment in November of that year, where he served until his discharge in April 1970.

5. Mr Stevens has tried to obtain confirmation of his involvement in the covert operation, but no record of his involvement could be located. Specifically, Mr Stevens sent a letter to the Australian Army which was received on 18 May 2004. However, when the Australian Army wrote back to him on 29 July 2004 the letter stated that, “I regret to advise that a thorough search of this office has failed to locate any documents which substantiate the events referred to in your enquiry”.

9. Mr Stevens has provided detailed statements to the Respondent and to the Tribunal describing the covert operation. In summary, he stated that he was deployed to Laos to assist in bombing a bridge that was close to the Vietnamese border and that he was instructed to kill the sentry (soldier guarding the bridge) with a knife while his partner set explosive charges under the bridge. In one statement dated 9 July 2019, Mr Stevens attested:

I was serving as a Trooper In the Special Air Service Regiment of the Australian Regular Army posted to the regiment's Base Squadron during the first days of February 1970. I was summoned to the Regimental Major's office where he was in company with my Squadron C. O., Major, W. Marshall and Lieutenant J. Flannery. I was ordered that in company with another Trooper I would travel to a section in Laos, a country under United Nations military sanctions and assist in the destruction of a bridge that Intelligence had identified that the North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong were using to ferry soldiers, armoury, ammunition and supplies into Vietnam. I was informed that I had been recommended for this mission by Lt. Flannery who had been the C.O. of my Cadre Course and was later my C.O. when I assisted with new cadre courses during training. I asked why 3 Squadron that was currently in Vietnam couldn't do this job and was told that it was otherwise occupied therefore I was ordered to undertake this mission. I objected, pointing out that I was awaiting release from the Army, but was told that while I was in the Army I would do as ordered. I was also given the order that I was not to discuss this job with any Trooper in the Regiment or anybody else prior to the mission or after as it was not going to be officially recorded.

The intelligence gathered reported that after daylight hours there was only one sentry on the bridge and that the early hours in the morning was the best time to complete the mission. My task was to silence any bridge-sentry and search for any log books or other documentation if any. Lt. Flannery knew my night and map-reading skills were good and told me that was why I was selected to go. He, as a former Vietnam Trainer, taught me how to use a blade to silence the sentry as my partner, Jeff, was to set charges on the bridge then blow it up. Our Liaison Officer in Vietnam was a Lieutenant from 3 Squadron.

The Liaison Officer met us at Nui Dat at the start of the second week when we landed after one stop that, I presumed, was for refuelling. He issued the explosives and charges to my partner. I was given the radio, our frequency and call-sign and the Liaison Officer's call-sign. We were then driven to where a helicopter was waiting which we both boarded. There were two pilots and two gunners situated on each side of the helicopter. Once at the drop-zone we left the chopper as the vegetation was low and made it possible. We both lay on the ground after the chopper left just to ensure we were alone. We were approximately ten miles from the bridge at that time and the vegetation gave us adequate cover. The terrain was not steep so we were able to move slowly but easily. After approximately three hours we got to within 100 yards of the bridge where we set up our position under the vegetation. We lay head to toe so we had a full 360-degree vision but I was also responsible for counting the number of enemy vehicles over and back, the number of soldiers, armoury and ammunition trucks. We lay watching and recording every vehicle that went across that bridge. At night we took two-hourly breaks each to sleep and eat as during daylight hours neither of us ate or slept.

Whenever a truck full of soldiers (a platoon – 30 men) arrived at the Laos side the soldiers disembarked and once the truck was safely over to the Vietnam side of Laos the men walked across, remounted the truck and then drove off. Any truck with ammunition and a towed artillery piece behind it was guided by the bridge-sentry as the truck moved over slowly. It was obvious that this bridge was not too secure as the intelligence photos showed. In all I counted 23 trucks, approximately 400 soldiers in 13 of the trucks. There were more in the trucks that carried arms, ammunition and artillery pieces and they also dismounted leaving only the driver and remounted on the other side. I do not remember how many artillery pieces crossed that bridge as I did not keep my note pad; there were 5 to 7 from memory. Ten to twelve vehicles returned empty and went over to the Laos side. I have no idea if they returned.

On the 4th night we went to the bridge, approximately between 03.00 hours and 03.30 hours, I went to the sentry's hut and did what I was taught to do [killed the sentry with a knife]. There was no records or log-books in the hut so I searched the dead sentry. He had nothing except a packet of cigarettes, matches and a photograph of him and his wife holding their baby. I returned it to his left breast-pocket. I gave my mate a flicker of my lighter so he knew it was all clear for him to do his job. By the time I got to him he had the whole bridge set to go. Once a safe distance away he blew up the bridge and we grabbed the rest of our gear and ran, stopping every 100 yards or so to listen if the enemy was behind us and following. They were not, so we slowed to a fast walk for about a mile listening as we moved through the vegetation as we first went in - patrolling. Thankfully the vegetation in the area gave us adequate cover which made the going easier than we had anticipated. By approximately 05.00 hours we arrived back at our drop-zone ready for pick up. I called our Liaison Officer who told me we had to wait until he could get the chopper to our position for pickup. It took about two hours but when it came we mounted it and returned to Nui Dat where again, the Lieutenant was waiting in a jeep. He took our note-books and after debriefing us where we stood, he told us that they had intelligence that the NVA and VC were getting ready for a big advance on our troops so what we did may have saved some of our Diggers' lives. We were then driven to what was referred to as SAS Hill, showered, changed to clean jungle greens and socks and then fed. We returned to Campbell Barracks six days after we left where we were debriefed again by Lt. Flannery.

I spoke to my Sergeant, Ian Ramsey, about it. He informed me that being so close to Joe Flannery and seeing part of my training he knew everything I did and after we discussed it I told him that I was angry that I was ordered to do what I did and he told me, that’s the job, we all do it so suck it up and get on with it. Until my final discharge I again assisted on Cadre Courses and regimental duties."

Because I was ordered never to divulge anything to do with that job to anyone I took that order to be in force even after my discharge. I was extremely angry at what I was ordered to do with a minimum of training or preparation".

Having read all of that, here is the reason the AAT upheld the decision of the Veterans Review Board that originally rejected Steven's claims.

The effect of these provisions of the VEA is that, as there is no evidence that Mr Stevens was allotted for duty in an operational area and, he does not meet the definition of having rendered eligible war service. This in turn means that Mr Stevens’ posttraumatic stress disorder cannot be taken to be war-caused because there is no evidence that it arose out of, or was attributable to, any eligible war service that he rendered. This means that he is not eligible for a Pension.

To translate the above into veterans language. Stevens is a bullshit artist and a pathological liar.

Instances like this should be prosecuted under the Australian Defence Act 1903 Part VII Section 80A for falsely representing to be a returned soldier. That offence has a maximum penalty of $3,300 or six months imprisonment, or both.

Perhaps a few prosecutions by state police, may discourage the fraudsters, and allow those genuinely in need to get a fair go.

We are not sure what the penalty may be, for falsely claiming to blow up a bridge in Laos. The Laotians may wish to sue Stevens for wilful destruction of the bridge and murder of the guard.

We are happy to report Stevens, but because of his knife work, he is not welcome within ten kilometers of ANZMI.

Surname: Bateman
Christian Names: Toby
Country: Australia
State or Province: New South Wales
City or Town: Shoalhaven
Service: Claims Navy Reserve, USA Navy and Army
Branch: Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD)
Commencement of service: Claims 1972
Completion of service: Claims 1980
Case Notes:

 

We know this man resides in the Shoalhaven/Nowra region of New South Wales, however despite many hours of research we have been unable to track him down.

We ask our readers, particularly those from Shoalhaven/Nowra, if they are able to identify a man named, Toby Bateman. Bateman is a particularly skilled deceiver. however, like all liars, he makes mistakes in the detail.

All of his offending has been on social media.

Toby Bateman has ridiculed and threatened, those who question his Vietnam Service. He threatened two people, who questioned his service, on social media:

Bateman T1


Over many years we have learned that wannabes first defence, is to threaten those who expose them. Genuine veteran may get a bit "stroppy" but are always proud to provide their bona fides. It is so easy to simply provide evidence of service.

Bateman claims to have transferred from Royal Australian Navy Reserve, to full time service with the United States Navy, in 1972. He has said a lot about his "service", and is knowledgeable, but makes many mistakes in the detail. Here is his "service" as advertised on social media:

Bateman T2


Claims to have served at Fort Bragg in USA, but wrongly spells "Bragg" with only one "g". It is correctly spelled Fort Bragg. Named after General Braxton Bragg.

He is also a Motor Bike enthusiast. and wrote the following about a motor bike track.

Bateman T9


Notice the motif in the top left corner, is the same as those relating to his US Navy service. Anyone who knows the identity of this person should please contact us

What do we know about Bateman?:

He was born in Sydney in 1953, making him now 67 years of age.
Now resides in Nowra/Shoalhaven area of NSW.
He is a motorbike enthusiast, associated with "Triumph" motorbikes. He is Regional Representative for a Triumph Motor bike club as shown below.

Bateman T10
Bateman T3


He claims to be both ex Australian Navy Reservist and a USA Navy, Vietnam veteran.
Claims to have served in Da Nang Vietnam in 1975. Spells Da Nang as "Dar Nang"
Here is the official history of US Navy presence in Da Nang Vietnam. All departed by 1973.

Camp Tien Sha, a.k.a. Naval Support Activity Da Nang was established in 1964 and disestablished in April 1972. On 29 March 1973 the last American units left Da Nang. On 25 Aug 14973, the USA Congress passed the "Case Church Amendment" which forbade any further USA Military involvement in Vietnam.

Claims to have Joined RAN (R) in 1972 aged 19 years. National Australian Archives have no record of him ever serving.

He claims he was presented with the USA medals shown below for his Vietnam and USA Navy service.

Bateman T4


First row:
Claims these USA medals for his Vietnam service, they are out of precedence order.

Bronze Star Medal.
Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal.
Vietnam Service Medal.
National Defence Service Medal.

Second row
Bronze Star Ribbon.
Fleet Marine Force Ribbon (can't be positive of the colour).
Vietnam Service Medal.
Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation with Palm.

The third row.
Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation with Palm.

The fourth row.
National Defense Service Medal.
Combat Action Ribbon (it is upside down).
Navy & Marine Corps Overseas Service Ribbon.

Claims his USN Vietnam service was acknowledged by Australian Honours and Awards and was awarded an Australian Active service Medal (AASM) and an Australian Service Medal (ASM). This did not occur.

Bateman T5


Has photographs from a helicopter of his service in Vietnam in 1975. Photograph was proven to have been taken by, and belonging to, a person from Kansas USA who knows nothing of Bateman being in that helicopter, and advises that the photograph was not taken in 1975

Bateman T6


Claims there were still Australian troops in Vietnam in 1975. See details in above insert.

Claims Australian troops departed Vietnam by chartered QANTAS flight on 25 April 1975. In fact the last QANTAS charter to carry Australian troops, was in 1972. QANTAS had "Baby rescue flights from Saigon in 1975, but no Troops were aboard

Bateman T7


Claims his US Navy unit was USN 5 Platoon Air Mobile Combat Ordnance disposal, which is incorrect. For example US Navy, uses the term "EOD Mobile Unit Eleven" . EOD Stands for "Explosive Ordnance Disposal.

Bateman T8


Like the "Scarlet Pimpernel" Toby Bateman is hard to pin down, however, we now hope that with your help, we may be able to receive a photograph of him, and also ask him directectly about his US Navy service in Vietnam.

It would be a great pleasure to receive from him definitive proof of his service.

Initially, Bateman was communicating with returned veterans on a social media website, and those returned veterans, like us, know full well that Bateman is a liar and a wannabe.

At the moment, Bateman is in the ANZMI remand section, and when information is received, we look forward to promoting him to full time service with ANZMI.

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