Ross

Date of Entry: 29 Jul 16
Surname: Ross
Christian Names: Stuart Alban
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Brisbane
Service #: Not Known
Service: Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Not Known
Completion of service: Not Known
Case Notes:

 

 

Ross 1 2

The above photo of Ross was taken at the Cannon Hill RSL 2016 Dawn Service, with his campaign medals proudly displayed.

Ross joined the Australian Army as a volunteer and served a significant amount of time in Vietnam, 594 days in fact. This is an impressive period of service, and for that service he can be justifiably proud, just like the many others who saw active service.

Ross 2

Ross, however, cannot be proud of the fact he has attached a commemorative, or as commonly known, a ‘tin medal’, to his Service medals. Doing such may impress those that do not know, however, you do not fool your fellow veterans.

Ross 3

The Front Line Service Medal was issued by the 2/12 Battalion Association to identify those who took part in World War Two front line actions with the Infantry, differentiating them from other units.

Defence Honours and Awards has this to say about such medals:

“A relatively recent phenomenon medal world is the appearance of a wide variety of non-official medals, generally referred to as ‘private commemoratives’ but also called ‘tinnies’. A non-official medal is any medal that is not listed in the Order of Wearing of Australian Honours and Awards, which was published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette Special No. S.101 of 4 April 2002.

Medals not listed in the order of wear may be worn officially, on an unrestricted basis, only with the express permission of the Governor-General. As a general rule, such permission is extended only to official awards of foreign governments. It has never been extended to private commemorative medals. Those medals should not be worn at all, and certainly never on the left hand side and mounted with officially issued medals”.

Over the years this policy has appeared to relax a little, with commemorative medals being worn on the right hand side of civilian clothing, and if Ross were to wear this thing, that is where it should be.

Ross has deliberately flouted Government policy in order to give himself just that little more recognition and set himself apart from other Veterans. What he does not seem to understand is that he does not need that piece of ‘tin’ to show his ‘front line’ service as that has been adequately recognised by the Infantry Combat Badge he also wears on his suit.

Stuart Alban Ross, your Vietnam service has earned you the medals that you can be proud to wear, however, by adding a worthless commemorative medal, you have earned yourself a place on the ever-increasing parade numbers on the ANZMI site.

 

Located in: Medal Cheats
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