Hall

Surname: Hall
Christian Names: Thomas Eyre
Country: Australia
State or Province: NSW
City or Town: Hornsby
Service: CMF/Army Reserve
Branch: Infantry/Armour
Case Notes:

Updated 5 Sep 2013

Thomas Eyre HALL, born 07 October 1933 of Hornsby New South Wales, did a short visit of 15 days to Vietnam as a Citizen Military Force (CMF) officer. However, he wears both the Vietnam medals pretending to be a Vietnam Veteran that completed a full tour.

 

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You will notice in the photo that the medals have not been mounted by a professional as the ribbons are of varying lengths and look quite untidy.

In the photo above, which is not that clear and taken a while back, you will see that he appears to be wearing the following medals;

Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75 clasp Vietnam (entitled)

Vietnam Medal (not entitled only entitled to the Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal VLSM)

Reserve Forces Decoration with one clasp (entitled)

National Medal with clasp (entitled) medal and first clasp awarded 30 Aug 2000

QE2 1953 Coronation Medal (not entitled, he was only 19 years old in July 1953)

Efficiency Decoration with bar Australia and first clasp (entitled) medal awarded 1967 clasp 1973

National Service 1951-1972 Medal (not entitled as this is an unofficial tin medal purchased)

South Vietnam Campaign Medal (not entitled, did only 15 days not the 181 days required)

He also appears to be wearing the Infantry Combat Badge just above his medals which he is not entitled to.

During our investigation we received a photo of Hall’s updated medals. Appears he is still wearing the same jumper and jacket. You will notice the medals have been re-arranged and additional medals appear, one of which replaces the tin medal he is wearing in the original photo received.

 

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The 2nd photo was taken either 2007 or 2009.

In this photo he is still pretending to be a Vietnam Veteran who has completed a full tour. The medals are;

Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75 (the parachute lapel badge should not be worn on that medal)

Vietnam Logistic Support Medal (with the Vietnam Ribbon)

QE2 1953 Coronation Medal (not entitled)

Defence Force Service Medal (not entitled) new

Reserve Forces Decoration with two clasps (entitled)

National Medal with 1 clasp (entitled)

Australian Defence Force Medal (entitled) new (15 tears service Regular Army or 12 years and 3 years in the Reserves)

Efficiency Decoration with bar Australia and first clasp (entitled)

Anniversary of National Service 1951-1972 Medal (entitled, replaced the tin medal) new

South Vietnam Campaign Medal (not entitled minimum time 181 days in country)

HALL is only entitled to the Australian Active service Medal (AASM 1945-75) which was approved in 1997 for one reason only and that is when the VLSM was instituted in 1993. So prior to those medals being approved he was not entitled to any medals for Vietnam until 1993.

 This is the medal he is entitled to wear.

 

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 This is the Vietnam Medal.

 

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You will notice he is wearing the VLSM medal with the Vietnam Medal ribbon. The difference between the two medals besides the ribbon colour is where the medal and ribbon are joined. How many others out there are doing the same thing?

The following information is from the gazettes pertaining to the medals.

The AASM

(iv) the Medal may be awarded to a member of the Australian Defence

Force who rendered service as such a member for a period of 30

days, or for periods amounting in the aggregate to 30 days, for

official visits, inspections or other occurrences of a temporary

nature in connection with the military contribution in the

prescribed operation;

HALL did not complete 30 days service.

(vii) the Medal may be awarded to a person who, as a member of the

Defence Force, qualified for the Vietnam Logistic and Support

Medal in accordance with the conditions for that award set out in

Regulations and Letters Patent dated 24 February 1993; and

The Vietnam Medal

The conditions of award of the Medal shall be common to members of the

three Services and shall be:

(i) service of twenty-eight days, continuous or aggregated, in ships or craft

employed in operations on inland waters or off the coast of Vietnam;

(ii) service of one day or more on the posted strength of a unit or formation

on land in Vietnam;

(iii) one operational sortie over Vietnam or Vietnamese waters by aircrew on

the posted strength of a unit allocated for direct support of operations in

Vietnam; or

(iv) service of thirty days, continuous or aggregated, for official visits,

inspections or, other occurrences of a temporary nature on duty in

Vietnam, or in ships_ or craft engaged in operations off the Vietnamese

coast.

HALL did not complete 30 days service and he was not on the posted strength of a unit namely 6 Battalion Royal Australian Regiment (RAR) but attached for a two week CMF visit to get eyes on experience on the layout of the Task Force base at Nui Dat and how operations were carried out and visiting units within the base. He would not have completed the required training to go out on operations with any units.

 

VlETNAM LOGISTIC AND SUPPORT MEDAL REGULATIONS

Conditions for the award of the Medal

4. (1) The Medal may be awarded for service of one day or more in the area of

operations of Vietnam during the relevant period:

(a) as a member of the crew of a ship or aircraft operating in support of the

Australian Armed Forces;

(b) while attached to a unit or organisation operating in support of the Australian

Armed Forces;

(c) while attached to, or serving with, a unit of the Australian Armed Forces or

allied forces as an observer

Hall is entitled to the VLSM as mentioned in 4. (1) and (b) or (c). Notice the word attached not posted.

 

The Queen Elizabeth II 1953 Coronation Medal.

As mentioned before HALL was only 19 years old so why would he be awarded that medal.

As it happens we managed to locate on a web site a copy of the Sydney Morning Herald dated Tuesday 2 June 1953 which states that 11,500 medals were awarded and lists the names of the persons awarded the medal. Thomas Eyre HALL is not one of them.

We managed to copy the names mentioned in the paper which you can see below or you can go to the website and view the list yourself. The medal he is wearing either belongs to someone else or he has purchased it.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/18371227

 

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Anniversary of National Service 1951-1972 Medal

This medal was not introduced till 2001 so HALL like others purchased an unofficial tin medal to show they did National Service duty until he eventually applied for the official medal.

Our first search for the service file for Thomas Hall was in three sections altogether over 8 inches in density. He served as a National Serviceman (NS) in the 1950’s with the Royal Australian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers with the service number 270362, where he reached the rank of Corporal. Hall transferred from national service to the Citizen Military Forces (CMF) when he was allocated a new service number 2234018 and reverted to the rank of Private on 05 January 1957. On 07 December 1957 he was appointed to the Commissioned Officer rank of Lieutenant. One of the CMF units he served in was 1 Commando Company.

His records show he was an officer in the Royal Australian Infantry (RAINF) and the Royal Australian Armoured Corps (RAAC) during his time in service. As some documents were missing we are not aware if he spent time in the Australian Regular Army.

The majority of paperwork relates to two “Redress of Wrongs”, when he was adversely reported on by his superiors in 1966 and 1967 and again in 1973-74.

Ultimately he wrote two Ministerial letters to the Minister of Army and earned himself the title of vexatious litigant. He was adversely reported on for his dress and bearing, attitude, conduct unbecoming as a Major, treating his underlings with disdain and ignoring any commands given by superiors.

As mentioned above, Hall now a Major during the Vietnam War was able to do a short visit of 15 days on Full Time Duty (FTD) as per the regulations at the time and was attached “not posted on strength” to 6 Battalion Royal Australian Regiment (RAR) from 04/02/1970 to 18/02/1970.

After carrying out his short visit, Hall wrote a submission that he shouldn’t have to pay tax for the period in South Vietnam (in reality a fortnightly CMF camp period). Again reams of paperwork resulted from this submission which included the Australian Tax office and the Minister for Army.

 

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Our second search for his service record revealed the rest of his service record which may have been filed under his National Service file.

 

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The service records are not complete as no discharge date is given, but going by an interview he gave to the Sydney Morning Herald on 27 August 1994, titled “The Heroes Who Disappeared” written by Philip Cornford, Hall stated he retired at 53 years of age which would mean he retired from what was then called the Army Reserves not the CMF around 1986.

They were the days of large newspapers and we failed to find the article on line, but State libraries do keep copies of newspapers on record so a section of the article was photographed as seen below.

 

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Now according to Hall he joined the Regular Army as a Captain in October 1963. The truth is he was still a CMF officer who went on Full Time Duty. He did not resign from the CMF and enlist in the Regular Army. The dates of his full time service were 4 Oct 1963 to 11 February 1966 as can be seen in his service record and he remained in the CMF till he retired

 

 

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Having read the article, it would appear Hall only went full time in the army to try and get access to files that were still classified in regard to Special Operations Australia, a top secret covert unit based on the British Special Operations Executive. These files would be classified till 30 years after the war.

He needed access to these files to uncover what happened on the Rimau mission, the second raid on Singapore Harbour which unfortunately failed and the men never heard from again.

 

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After Hall returned to the CMF, he continued to get access to the files and as Hall stated in the article he was told by a Brigadier, Commander of the Fifth Task Force, a CMF Unit, that he had better stop making a nuisance of himself. Hall ignored the warning and a year later was summoned to Victoria Barracks in Sydney and confronted by a General Officer Commanding Eastern Command, a Major General, a Brigadier and a full Colonel and ordered to top asking questions about Rimau or face a Court Martial. Hall as quoted in the article said, “Go for your bloody life, General.”

This may explain his bad report at the start of the case.

Hall also stated in the article that he went to Vietnam as a CMF Observer and was wounded twice in 24 hours forcing his early retirement at 53 years of age.

 

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When you look at his service record there is no mention of him being wounded or injured whilst on his CMF visit with 6 Battalion RAR. All that is recorded is he flew from Sydney to Saigon via Darwin and flew back to Sydney at the end of his visit.

Now he may have tripped over in a drunken stupor and bruised or scratched himself, but there are no records of him being wounded in Vietnam.

If you check the following site you will also find he is not listed there.

http://www.thecasualtylist.com/

Thomas Eyre HALL as an officer, you are a disgrace to the Officer Corps by pretending to be a Vietnam Veteran, lying about being wounded, wearing the Vietnam medals and wearing the Coronation Medal you are not entitled to, not to mention the tin medal.

You have shown that you are a man that shows no respect to the Vietnam Veterans that earned those medals, especially those that never made it back. You also show that you are a man of no integrity and most of all, no honour or honesty or respect for your superiors whilst a serving member of the Australian Defence Force.

It is no wonder the comments we received when your case first went up, makes it quite plain the men that served under you had no respect for you. A good leader always leads by example and you have shown yourself to be a very poor leader.

You can only be described as a very arrogant man who deserves to be on our website.

This is published in the public interest, veterans of all conflicts, in particular that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from the private citizens are supported by statement of fact and statutory declarations.

Persons appearing on our site that are now deceased will not be removed, but the case will have the word "Deceased" placed next to their name when we are advised.

Located in: Stolen Valour
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