Watson

Surname: Watson
Christian Names: Paul
Country: Australia
State or Province: QLD
City or Town: Mackay
Service: Citizen Military Forces
Case Notes:
WATSON Paul

Paul Watson is an enigma. He is not the dribbling drunk at the end of the bar trying to impress with outrageous stories of war time exploits.  He is a sales representative for Detroit Diesel.  He is the Secretary of the North Mackay Bowls Club.  He is described as a very private person who does not tell war stories of boast of daring exploits as depicts many wannabes. 

He is also a liar who is in a position of trust.

On previous years he had marched on ANZAC Day with other veterans but minus the ribbons and medals.  Yet on ANZAC Day 2006 he went to the RSL wearing the Vietnam Medal Ribbon, the Vietnam Campaign Medal Ribbon and what was believed to be the Australian Active Service Medal Ribbon but no medals.  He stood out because of the soiled and bedraggled condition the ribbons were in.  He was asked by other veterans where his medals were and said initially that he had lost them but subsequently changed his story and said that his former wife had his medals.

Veterans who saw Watson were suspicious, mainly because this was the first time he had worn ribbons even though he had previously marched with veterans on ANZAC Day.  Veterans were so suspicious two of them went to see him at his home in Hocken Street, North Mackay and questioned his right to wear service decorations.  He was asked to clarify his service.  Paul Watson told these veterans that he was a member of 17 Battalion, Royal New South Wales Regiment (17RNSWR), Citizen's Military Forces, and had trained at  the Jungle Warfare Training Centre at Canungra (J.T.C) prior to service in Vietnam.  He said that he had been sent to Vietnam on three occasions, six days at a time, where he had been attached to 3 RAR trialling special weapons in the   Mekong Delta.  He said that he was entitled to wear the Vietnam medal.  When asked why he was wearing the other ribbons he refused to answer.  Obviously he had no answer.

ANZMI has perused this mans record of service. From this it was ascertained that he is nothing more than a wannabe, a very poor CMF NCO and a liar.

He did serve with 17 RNSWR, service number 2183836.  He commenced his CMF service on 5 May 1965, was promoted to Corporal on 10 September 1966, promoted to temporary Sergeant on 1 May 1967, re-enlisted for two years on 5 May 1967 and was discharged at his own request on 23 May 1968.

Would this be a person who would be sent on specialist duties to South Vietnam? His attempts as an instructor would indicate not.

He instructed on the CMF Division Recruits Course 5/67.  In the subsequent report on CMF instructors WO's and NCO's in November 1967 he was described as being below average in most areas and only average in others.

His platoon Commander comments, "Has not put sufficient effort into task, somewhat lazy, lacks control of squads, poor bearing".

Company Commander comments, "Appears to need a lot more experience to be capable of holding this rank, possibly too rapid promotion".

Senior Instructor's comments, "This NCO was disappointing and not up to the high standards of most 17 RNSWR NCOs'

Watson was also advised in writing that he must improve or discharge could follow and as we now know, it did soon after.

This man is one poor excuse for a CMF NCO.  Anyone who has ever served with the 17 RNSWR would not be proud that he was once one of their ranks.  Vietnam Veterans should be disgusted that this sorry fellow has stolen their honour.

Paul Watson's record of service shows that he has never served overseas so why would he say that he had? Why would he be stupid enough to tell ex 3 RAR veterans that he had served with 3 RAR in the Delta?

We don't know the answer to those questions and would be pleased if anyone could enlighten us.  We wonder if he has anything else to hide as it would appear that when ever someone tries to take his photograph he appears to move away so it can't be taken.  One thing we do know however, Paul Watson spent a few short years with a CMF unit during a period when many young Australian men were fighting an enemy in another land.  In his CMF role he never did much and never went anywhere and, as indicated by his record of service, was not very good as an NCO in fact he was not even mediocre, he was below average.  This man has worn service decorations he is not entitled to and claimed to be a veteran of the Vietnam conflict.  He has dishonoured real veterans at their day of remembrance, ANZAC Day.  He has also committed serious offences against the Defence Act 1903, namely section 80A, Falsely representing to be a returned servicemen and section 80B, Improper Use of Service Decorations.  Each one of these offences carries a penalty of a fine of $3300.00 and/or 6 months imprisonment.  

ANZMI wrote to Paul Watson giving him the opportunity to provide us with evidence of his service in Vietnam.  We have not received an answer however, an unsigned letter purporting to have been written by Paul Watson was left in the letter box of one of the 3RAR veterans who confronted him on Anzac Day.  This letter was subsequently obtained by ANZMI and it indicates, though the truth of this has not been verified, that Watson was wearing the ribbons of an alleged friend who was killed in action in Vietnam.  The deceased person has immediate relatives who can wear the ribbons on Anzac day and for this reason we will not publish the letter without obtaining express permission from the family so as not to re-kindle bad memories for them. 

Paul Watson, you have no right to wear service decorations nor have you the right to claim warlike service.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from private citizens are supported by statements of fact and statutory declarations.

 

Located in: Stolen Valour
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